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Article ID: 704195

Researcher seeks vaccine to prevent lethal pneumonia

West Virginia University

About half of all people with cystic fibrosis, the most common genetic disorder in the United States, die from a lung disease before they turn 40. A form of pneumonia called Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a likely culprit. WVU researcher Mariette Barbier is pursuing new ways to vaccinate at-risk populations against this deadly illness.

Released:
20-Nov-2018 8:30 AM EST
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Article ID: 704258

In Heart Failure, a Stronger Heart Could Spell Worse Symptoms

Thomas Jefferson University

Patients with stronger-pumping hearts have as many physical and cognitive impairments as those with weaker hearts, suggesting the need for better treatment.

Released:
20-Nov-2018 8:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704253

Self-Management Program for Patients with COPD Boosts Quality of Life, Cuts Rehospitalization Risk

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that a program designed to enhance self-care and lead to more seamless management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults successfully reduced rates of emergency room visits and hospitalization, and the burdensome symptoms and limitations caused by the condition.

Released:
20-Nov-2018 8:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 704194

Does Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why” Influence Teen Suicide? Survey Asks At-Risk Youths

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A significant proportion of suicidal teens treated in a psychiatric emergency department said that watching the Netflix series “13 Reasons Why” had increased their suicide risk, a University of Michigan study finds.

Released:
19-Nov-2018 10:05 AM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 703886

Reducing the Impact Forces of Water Entry

American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

As professional divers complete what’s known as a rip dive, their hands remove water in front of the body, creating a cavity that reduces the initial impact force. The rest of the body is aligned to shoot through the same cavity created by the hands. Using the hands to create cavities in the water's surface is similar to the concept behind the fluid-structure studies that researchers at Utah State University are conducting using spheres. They’ll present their work at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20.

Released:
13-Nov-2018 11:30 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Nov-2018 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 703706

Aquatic Animals that Jump Out of Water Inspire Leaping Robots

American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Ever watch aquatic animals jump out of the water and wonder how they manage to do it in such a streamlined and graceful way? Researchers who specialize in water entry and exit in nature had the same question. During the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20, they will present their work designing a robotic system inspired by jumping copepods and frogs to illuminate some of the fluid dynamics at play when aquatic animals jump.

Released:
9-Nov-2018 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704260

2018-19 Airline Food Study

Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center / DietDetective.com

The study assigned a “Health Score” (5 stars = highest rate, 0 star = lowest) based on eleven criteria including health and calorie levels of meals, snack boxes and individual snacks, level of transparency (display nutrient information & ingredients), improvement and maintenance of healthy offerings, menu innovation, food and water safety and cooperation in providing this information. The survey includes health ratings, average calories per airline, comments, best bets, food offerings, costs, nutrition information (e.g., calories, and exercise equivalents.

Released:
20-Nov-2018 7:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704252

Planetary Geologist and Undergrads Embedded at JPL for NASA’s InSight Mars Landing

State University of New York at Geneseo

Two undergraduate researchers will join Geneseo planetary geologist Nick Warner at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Nov. 26 in Pasadena, Calif., for the scheduled 3 p.m. ET landing of InSight, NASA’s latest mission to Mars. The team will work for several weeks to characterize the area around the lander and make recommendations to NASA engineers on where to place the sensitive geological instruments that will explore the planet's crust, mantle and core.

Released:
20-Nov-2018 7:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704259

Researchers stop ‘sneaky’ cancer cells in their tracks

University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. The discovery could have a major impact on millions of people undergoing therapies to prevent the spread of cancer within the body.

Released:
20-Nov-2018 7:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 704133

How to Convert Climate-Changing Carbon Dioxide into Plastics and Other Products

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers scientists have developed catalysts that can convert carbon dioxide – the main cause of global warming – into plastics, fabrics, resins and other products. The electrocatalysts are the first materials, aside from enzymes, that can turn carbon dioxide and water into carbon building blocks containing one, two, three or four carbon atoms with more than 99 percent efficiency.

Released:
20-Nov-2018 5:00 AM EST
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