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Newswise: A new form of glass through molecular entanglement

A new form of glass through molecular entanglement

University of Vienna

Physicists at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have discovered a new type of glass formed by long, cyclic molecules. The scientists successfully demonstrated that by making parts of the rings more mobile, the rings become more strongly entangled and the molecular fluid glassifies.

Channels: All Journal News, Physics, Nature (journal),

Released:
8-Jan-2020 7:05 AM EST
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Has physics ever been deterministic?

University of Vienna

Researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Vienna and the University of Geneva, have proposed a new interpretation of classical physics without real numbers. This new study challenges the traditional view of classical physics as deterministic.In classical physics it is usually assumed that if we know where an object is and its velocity, we can exactly predict where it will go.

Channels: All Journal News, Mathematics, Physics, Quantum Mechanics,

Released:
6-Dec-2019 12:35 PM EST
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Newswise: How flowers adapt to their pollinators

How flowers adapt to their pollinators

University of Vienna

The first flowering plants originated more than 140 million years ago in the early Cretaceous. They are the most diverse plant group on Earth with more than 300,000 species. In a new study in Communications Biology, evolutionary biologists around Agnes Dellinger and Jürg Schönenberger from the University of Vienna have analysed 3-dimensional models of flowers and found that flower shapes can evolve in a modular manner in adaptation to distinct pollinators.

Channels: All Journal News, Paleontology, Plants,

Released:
5-Dec-2019 10:25 AM EST
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Newswise: Meteorite-Loving Microorganism

Meteorite-Loving Microorganism

University of Vienna

The archaeon Metallosphaera sedula can uptake and process extraterrestrial material. This is shown by an international team led by astrobiologist Tetyana Milojevic, who examines microbial fingerprints on meteorite materials. The researchers also conclude that M. sedula colonizes meteorite minerals faster than those of terrestrial origin.

Channels: Chemistry, Physics, Space and Astronomy, All Journal News,

Released:
3-Dec-2019 8:05 AM EST
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Newswise: United in musical diversity

United in musical diversity

University of Vienna

Two articles in the most recent issue of Science support the idea that music all around the globe shares important commonalities, despite many differences. Cognitive biologists Tecumseh Fitch and Tudor Popescu of the University of Vienna suggest that human musicality unites all cultures across the planet.

Channels: All Journal News, Arts and Entertainment,

Released:
22-Nov-2019 5:05 AM EST
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Newswise: Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice

Applying biodiversity conservation research in practice

University of Vienna

One million species are threatened with extinction, many of them already in the coming decades. This unprecedented loss of biodiversity threatens valuable ecosystems and human well-being. But what is holding us back from putting conservation research into practice? The journal Biological Conservation has published a collection of 14 articles on this topic.

Channels: All Journal News, Climate Science, Environmental Science,

Released:
12-Nov-2019 7:05 AM EST
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Newswise: Ancient Rome: A 12,000-Year History of Genetic Flux, Migrations and Diversity

Ancient Rome: A 12,000-Year History of Genetic Flux, Migrations and Diversity

University of Vienna

Scholars have been all over Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets – for instance, relatively little is known about where the city’s denizens actually came from. Now, an international team led by Researchers from the University of Vienna, Stanford University and Sapienza University of Rome, is filling in the gaps with a genetic history that shows just how much the Eternal City’s populace mirrored its sometimes tumultuous history.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Genetics, Staff Picks,

Released:
8-Nov-2019 3:05 AM EST
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Newswise: From cone snail venom to pain relief

From cone snail venom to pain relief

University of Vienna

Conotoxins are bioactive peptides found in the venom that marine cone snails produce for prey capture and defense. They are used as pharmacological tools to study pain signalling and have the potential to become a new class of analgesics. To date, more than 10,000 conotoxin sequences have been discovered.

Channels: All Journal News, Pain, Pharmaceuticals,

Released:
4-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Many cooks don't spoil the broth: Manifold symbionts prepare their host for any eventuality
  • Embargo expired:
    14-Oct-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Many cooks don't spoil the broth: Manifold symbionts prepare their host for any eventuality

University of Vienna

Deep-sea mussels, which rely on cooperative symbiotic bacteria for their food, harbor a surprisingly high diversity of these bacterial "cooks": Up to 16 different bacterial strains live together in the mussel's gills, each with its own abilities and strengths. Thanks to this diversity of symbiotic bacterial partners, the mussel is prepared for all eventualities. The mussel bundles up an all-round carefree package, a German-Austrian research team including Jillian Petersen from the University of Vienna and Rebecca Ansorge and Nicole Dubilier from the Max-Planck-Institute for Marine Microbiology now reports in Nature Microbiology.

Channels: All Journal News, Environmental Health, Marine Science, Nature, Nature (journal),

Released:
14-Oct-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Placenta Transit of an Environmental Estrogen

Placenta Transit of an Environmental Estrogen

University of Vienna

The human foetus is considered to be particularly sensitive to environmental contaminants. A team led by Benedikt Warth from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna and Tina Bürki from the Swiss Materials Science and Technology Institute, Empa, has now been able to demonstrate for the first time how the widespread food estrogen zearalenone behaves in the womb.

Channels: Chemistry, Environmental Health, Food Science, In the Home, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
10-Oct-2019 5:05 AM EDT
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