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Embargo will expire: 24-Feb-2020 12:05 AM EST Released to reporters: 20-Feb-2020 2:00 PM EST

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Newswise: FAU Research Explores How Regulatory Ambiguity Has Discouraged Entrepreneurial Activity in Bitcoin Market
Released: 20-Feb-2020 12:30 PM EST
FAU Research Explores How Regulatory Ambiguity Has Discouraged Entrepreneurial Activity in Bitcoin Market
Florida Atlantic University

More than a decade after the launch of Bitcoin, regulatory ambiguity surrounding the peer-to-peer virtual currency continues to discourage entrepreneurial activity by increasing risk and the costs of compliance.

Newswise: Neighborhood Features and One’s Genetic Makeup Interact to Affect Cognitive Function
Released: 19-Feb-2020 8:30 AM EST
Neighborhood Features and One’s Genetic Makeup Interact to Affect Cognitive Function
Florida Atlantic University

Few studies have examined how the neighborhood’s physical environment relates to cognition in older adults. Researchers categorized 4,716 individuals by apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype – a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) to determine if there are cognitive benefits of living in neighborhoods with greater access to social, walking and retail destinations. Results showed that the positive influence of neighborhood environments on cognition are strongest among those who are at the lowest risk for AD, specifically APOE ε2 carriers.

Newswise: Researchers Challenge New Guidelines on Aspirin in Primary Prevention
Released: 17-Feb-2020 8:30 AM EST
Researchers Challenge New Guidelines on Aspirin in Primary Prevention
Florida Atlantic University

New guidelines recommend aspirin use in primary prevention for people ages 40 to 70 years old who are at higher risk of a first cardiovascular event, but not for those over 70. Yet, people over 70 are at higher risks of cardiovascular events than those under 70. As a result, health care providers are understandably confused about whether or not to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention of heart attacks or strokes, and if so, to whom.

Newswise: Many Teens are Victims of Digital Dating Abuse; Boys Get the Brunt of It
Released: 12-Feb-2020 8:30 AM EST
Many Teens are Victims of Digital Dating Abuse; Boys Get the Brunt of It
Florida Atlantic University

It’s almost Valentine’s Day, but there is nothing romantic about new research illuminating how teen dating abuse is manifesting online. A study of U.S. middle and high school students showed that 28.1 percent had been the victim of at least one form of digital dating abuse. More than one-third had been the victim of traditional dating abuse (offline). Boys in heterosexual relationships experienced all forms of digital dating abuse more than girls and were even more likely to experience physical aggression.

Newswise: The Nose Knows: Study Establishes Airborne Exposure to Harmful Algal Blooms’ Toxins
Released: 11-Feb-2020 8:30 AM EST
The Nose Knows: Study Establishes Airborne Exposure to Harmful Algal Blooms’ Toxins
Florida Atlantic University

There are no limits specific to airborne concentrations of microcystins (blue-green algae) or inhalation guidelines. Little is known about recreational and occupational exposure to these toxins. New research provides evidence of aerosol exposure to microcystins in coastal residents. Researchers detected microcystin in the nasal passages of 95 percent of the participants; some who reported no direct contact with impacted water. Results also showed higher concentrations among occupationally exposed individuals and demonstrated a relationship between nasal and water microcystin concentrations.

Newswise: Oh My Aching Back: Do Yoga, Tai Chi or Qigong Help?
Released: 6-Feb-2020 8:30 AM EST
Oh My Aching Back: Do Yoga, Tai Chi or Qigong Help?
Florida Atlantic University

About 80 percent of Americans will experience low back pain at some point. Patients are often advised to manage their back pain with exercise and mind-body interventions. But, do they really help? Researchers compared and contrasted yoga, tai chi and qigong, and found them to be effective for treatment of low back pain, reporting positive outcomes such as reduction in pain or psychological distress such as depression and anxiety, reduction in pain-related disability, and improved functional ability.

Newswise: Research Finds Publicly Funded Pregnancy-related Programs Can Improve Maternal Mortality Rates
Released: 5-Feb-2020 9:30 AM EST
Research Finds Publicly Funded Pregnancy-related Programs Can Improve Maternal Mortality Rates
Florida Atlantic University

The rigorous study using longitudinal data from Florida counties for 2001-2014 finds strong evidence that targeted pregnancy-related public health programs are effective at reducing maternal mortality rates, specifically among black mothers.

Newswise: Choosing Common Pain Relievers: It’s Complicated
Released: 5-Feb-2020 8:30 AM EST
Choosing Common Pain Relievers: It’s Complicated
Florida Atlantic University

About 29 million Americans use over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat pain. Every year in the U.S., NSAID use is attributed to approximately 100,000 hospitalizations and 17,000 deaths. All of these drugs have benefits and risks, but deciding which one to use is complicated for health care providers and their patients. To assist in clinical decision-making, researchers address cardiovascular risks and beyond, which include gastrointestinal and kidney side effects of pain relievers.

Newswise: Researchers Take Body Armor to the Next Level with High Energy Fibers
Released: 3-Feb-2020 8:30 AM EST
Researchers Take Body Armor to the Next Level with High Energy Fibers
Florida Atlantic University

Body armor for U.S. soldiers are heavy, cumbersome, and way above the desired aerial density, which limits their mobility and physical performance. FAU scientists expect to improve performance of military helmets and body armor using hybridized nanocomposite fibers. Like something out of the movie “Iron Man,” this new fiber will to lead to fast dissipation, greater energy absorption and ballistic performance. Bullet-proof armor performance is heavily dependent on the base material properties, which have changed little in recent years.



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