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Newswise: Crossing the Finish Line

Crossing the Finish Line

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Jeff Krieger didn’t ride off into the sunset. Even though he was finishing up his final radiation treatment for prostate cancer, the 64-year-old didn’t have anything so cliché on his mind.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Family and Parenting, Men's Health,

Released:
3-Dec-2019 12:50 PM EST
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Embargo will expire:
7-Dec-2019 7:30 AM EST
Released to reporters:
2-Dec-2019 12:00 PM EST

EMBARGOED

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Turning Key Metabolic Process Back On Could Make Sarcoma More Susceptible to Treatment

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Soft tissue sarcoma cells stop a key metabolic process which allows them to multiply and spread, and so restarting that process could leave these cancers vulnerable to a variety of treatments

Channels: All Journal News, Blood, Cancer, National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cell (journal), Grant Funded News,

Released:
26-Nov-2019 3:00 AM EST
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Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    21-Nov-2019 11:00 AM EST
Released:
19-Nov-2019 2:05 PM EST
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Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Nov-2019 11:30 AM EST

People in Counties with Worse Economies Post-Recession Are More Likely to Die from Heart Disease

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Communities in the United States that experienced the most economic distress in the wake of the Great Recession saw a significant increase in death rates from heart disease and strokes among middle-aged people, according to a new multi-institution study led by researchers at Penn Medicine.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Economics, Heart Disease, Medical Meetings,

Released:
18-Nov-2019 3:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-Nov-2019 1:30 PM EST

Early Diagnosis of Pregnancy-Associated Heart Disease Linked to Significantly Better Outcomes

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Women who are diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) during late pregnancy or within a month following delivery are more likely to experience restored cardiac function and improved outcomes compared to those who are diagnosed later in the postpartum period.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, OBGYN, Race and Ethnicity, Women's Health,

Released:
14-Nov-2019 11:20 AM EST
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Research Results
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Nov-2019 11:00 AM EST
Released:
13-Nov-2019 11:25 AM EST
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Research Results
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Eliminating Common Bacterial Infection Significantly Decreases Gastric Cancer Risk

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Heliobacter pylori infection, quite common around the world, is linked to gastric cancer. Now, a Penn study shows that successfully wiping out the infection lowers the cancer risk.

Channels: All Journal News, Digestive Disorders,

Released:
13-Nov-2019 5:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST

Taller People Have Increased Risk for Developing Atrial Fibrillation

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Taller people have an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation, according to a new Penn Medicine study. The research is the among the first to demonstrate that height may be a causal—not correlated—risk factor for AFib.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Genetics, Medical Meetings,

Released:
12-Nov-2019 8:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Nov-2019 11:00 AM EST

Penn Team Discovers Epigenetic Pathway that Controls Social Behavior in Carpenter Ants

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers discovered that a protein called CoRest, a neural repressor that is also found in humans, plays a central role in determining the social behavior of ants. The study also revealed that worker ants called Majors can be reprogrammed to perform the foraging role—generally reserved for their sisters.

Channels: All Journal News, Behavioral Science, Cell Biology, Genetics,

Released:
8-Nov-2019 8:05 AM EST
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