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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST

Family Caregivers Are Rarely Asked About Needing Assistance With Caring for Older Adults

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Family caregivers usually are not asked by health care workers about needing support in managing older adults’ care, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: Aging, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Family and Parenting, Healthcare, National Institute on Aging (NIA), JAMA, All Journal News,

Released:
22-Jan-2020 1:30 PM EST
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Less Active Infants Had Greater Fat Accumulation, Study Finds

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Less physical activity for infants below one year of age may lead to more fat accumulation which in turn may predispose them to obesity later in life, suggests a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Obesity, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 8:45 AM EST
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Analysis of FDA Documents Reveals Inadequate Monitoring of Key Program to Promote Safe Opioid Use

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A risk-management program set up in 2012 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to curb improper prescribing of extended-release and long-acting opioids may not have been effective because of shortcomings in the program’s design and execution, according to a paper from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, Public Health, JAMA,

Released:
7-Jan-2020 8:30 AM EST
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Survey: Majority of Voters Surveyed Support Greater Oversight of Industrial Animal Farms

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new survey released by the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future finds that the majority of registered voters support greater oversight of industrial animal farms. The Center for a Livable Future is based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: All Journal News, Drug Resistance, Food and Water Safety, Food Science, Pollution, Public Health,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 11:30 AM EST
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Young Children Receiving Housing Vouchers Had Lower Hospital Spending Into Adulthood

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Young children whose household received a housing voucher were admitted to the hospital fewer times and incurred lower hospital costs in the subsequent two decades than children whose households did not receive housing vouchers, according to a new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, In the Home, Poverty, JAMA,

Released:
3-Dec-2019 11:50 AM EST
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Study Reveals Urban Hotspots of High-Schoolers' Opioid Abuse

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that in several cities and counties the proportion of high-schoolers who have ever used heroin or misused prescription opioids is much higher than the national average.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Back to School, Children's Health, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Race and Ethnicity, Substance Abuse,

Released:
14-Nov-2019 11:50 AM EST
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Study Reveals Urban Hotspots of High-Schoolers’ Opioid Abuse

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that in several cities and counties the proportion of high-schoolers who have ever used heroin or misused prescription opioids is much higher than the national average.

Channels: Addiction, Alcohol and Alcoholism, All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Public Health,

Released:
14-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST
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Study Suggests Weight-Loss Surgery May Release Toxic Compounds From Fat Into the Bloodstream

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Toxic man-made chemicals—such as polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides—that are absorbed into the body and stored in fat may be released into the bloodstream during the rapid fat loss that follows bariatric surgery, according to a study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The finding points to the need for further research to understand the health effects of this potential toxicant exposure.

Channels: All Journal News, Obesity, Public Health, Surgery, Weight Loss,

Released:
13-Nov-2019 11:05 AM EST
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Bloomberg American Health Summit Kicks Off Tuesday Nov. 12 in Baltimore

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

After years of progress, the average life expectancy in the U.S. has been on the decline for three consecutive years. The second annual Bloomberg American Health Summit—taking place November 12 and 13, 2019, in Baltimore, Maryland—will bring together national leaders, policymakers, advocates, and innovators from across the country to share new knowledge and evidence-based practices around five focus areas implicated in reducing U.S. life expectancy: addiction and overdose, adolescent health, environmental challenges, obesity and the food system, and violence.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Environmental Health, Obesity, Public Health, Guns and Violence, Education,

Released:
11-Nov-2019 9:05 AM EST
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Education

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  • Embargo expired:
    8-Nov-2019 2:00 PM EST

New Tool Predicts Five-Year Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease With High Accuracy

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A new risk calculator tool that uses a mix of variables including age, hypertension, and diabetes status can be used to predict accurately whether someone is likely to develop chronic kidney disease within five years.

Channels: All Journal News, Kidney Disease, Technology, JAMA,

Released:
6-Nov-2019 3:05 PM EST
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Higher Education Event


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