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Newswise: Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A
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    18-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714272

Researchers find genetic cause for fatal response to Hepatitis A

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers have identified a genetic mutation that caused an 11-year-old girl to suffer a fatal reaction to infection with the Hepatitis A virus (HAV). The study, which will be published June 18 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that mutations in the IL18BP gene causes the body’s immune system to attack and kill healthy liver cells, and suggests that targeting this pathway could prevent the deaths of patients suffering rapid liver failure in response to viral infection.

Released:
12-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite
  • Embargo expired:
    12-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713966

Researchers identify human protein that aids development of malaria parasite

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the Plasmodium parasites responsible for malaria rely on a human liver cell protein for their development into a form capable of infecting red blood cells and causing disease. The study, which will be published June 12 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this human protein, known as CXCR4, could be a way to block the parasite’s life cycle and prevent the development of malaria.

Released:
5-Jun-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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Newswise: Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC
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    29-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713305

Researchers identify new roles for common oncogene MYC

The Rockefeller University Press

Cancer researchers have discovered surprising new functions for a protein called MYC, a powerful oncogene that is estimated to drive the development of almost half a million new cancer cases in the US every year. The study, which will be published May 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that MYC affects the efficiency and quality of protein production in lymphoma cells, fueling their rapid growth and altering their susceptibility to immunotherapy.

Released:
22-May-2019 9:25 AM EDT
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Newswise: Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals
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    16-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712629

Antibiotic treatment alleviates Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in male mice, study reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at The University of Chicago have demonstrated that the type of bacteria living in the gut can influence the development of Alzheimer’s disease symptoms in mice. The study, which will be published May 16 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that, by altering the gut microbiome, long-term antibiotic treatment reduces inflammation and slows the growth of amyloid plaques in the brains of male mice, though the same treatment has no effect on female animals.

Released:
13-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Metastatic Prostate Cancer
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    15-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712523

Researchers Identify New Therapeutic Target for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in New York have found that treating human prostate cancer cells with a drug that targets a protein called PHLPP2 may prevent the cancer cells from spreading to other organs in the body. The study, which will be published May 15 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that inhibiting PHLPP2 lowered the levels of MYC, an oncogenic protein that causes many different types of cancer that cannot be targeted by conventional drug therapies.

Released:
8-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Researchers identify early indicators of pregnancy complications in lupus patients
  • Embargo expired:
    8-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 710761

Researchers identify early indicators of pregnancy complications in lupus patients

The Rockefeller University Press

A study of pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus has identified early changes in the RNA molecules present in the blood that could be used to determine the likelihood of them developing preeclampsia. The study, which will be published April 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, may also help researchers develop treatments to prevent other pregnancy complications associated with lupus, including miscarriage and premature birth.

Released:
4-Apr-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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Newswise: Researchers discover why men are more likely to develop liver cancer
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    3-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 710311

Researchers discover why men are more likely to develop liver cancer

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Spain have discovered that a hormone secreted by fat cells that is present at higher levels in women can stop liver cells from becoming cancerous. The study, which will be published April 3 in the ournal of Experimental Medicine, helps explain why hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is more common in men, and could lead to new treatments for the disease, which is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide.

Released:
27-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Apr-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 710110

Researchers Discover How Tumor-Killing Immune Cells Attack Lymphomas in Living Mice

The Rockefeller University Press

In a study that will be published April 1 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, researchers from the Institut Pasteur and INSERM reveal that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can induce tumor regression by directly targeting and killing cancer cells, uncovering new details of how these immune cells work and how their effectiveness could be improved in the treatment of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and other B cell cancers.

Released:
25-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Epigenetic protein could be new therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia, study suggests
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    19-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 709614

Epigenetic protein could be new therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia, study suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

British researchers have discovered that an epigenetic protein called EZH2 delays the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but then switches sides once the disease is established to help maintain tumor growth. The study, which will be published March 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting EZH2 could therefore be an effective treatment for AML, an aggressive blood cancer expected to kill over 10,000 people in the US alone this year.

Released:
14-Mar-2019 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 708778

Gene transcription machinery constrains DNA movements, study suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Japan have discovered that the DNA inside human cells moves around less when its genes are active. The study, which will be published March 1 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that RNA polymerase II—the key enzyme required to produce messenger RNA molecules from active genes—restricts the movement of DNA by organizing it into a network of interconnected domains.

Released:
27-Feb-2019 8:05 AM EST
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