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Newswise: Self-Adhesive Dressing Generates Electrical Current That Promotes Healing, Reduces Infection Risk
Released: 30-Sep-2016 1:05 PM EDT
Self-Adhesive Dressing Generates Electrical Current That Promotes Healing, Reduces Infection Risk
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

From precious metals to maggots, physicians have tried just about everything to help reverse the negative spiral of chronic wounds. And for good reason – these types of non-healing wounds currently cost the healthcare system in excess of $20 billion a year, and millions of sufferers endure months of pain, disability and the constant concern of infection. Now, scientists are testing an experimental electrified mesh bandage that zaps bacteria and stimulates tissue healing.

Newswise: Swelling Obesity Rates May Be Tied to Childhood Antibiotic Use
Released: 30-Aug-2016 8:30 AM EDT
Swelling Obesity Rates May Be Tied to Childhood Antibiotic Use
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

As the nation’s obesity rate continues to skyrocket, scientists across the country are combing the health records of 1.6 million kids to determine if childhood antibiotic use causes weight gain later in life.

Newswise: First Ever Vaccine for Deadly Parasitic Infection May Help Prevent Another Global Outbreak
Released: 26-Apr-2016 8:00 AM EDT
First Ever Vaccine for Deadly Parasitic Infection May Help Prevent Another Global Outbreak
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

As the threat of the Zika virus rips through the Americas and news headlines, another more deadly tropical disease is also on the move: Leishmaniasis is a parasitic infection that currently endangers an estimated 350 million people around the world. By combining two decades of research, ancient tribal medicine and the latest in gene editing technology – a team of scientists is creating what could be the first ever live-attenuated vaccine to prevent Leishmaniasis both here and abroad.

Released: 2-Feb-2016 8:05 AM EST
Adolescent Weight Gain on Popular Injectable Contraceptive May Depend on Micronutrient Intake
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Since its introduction nearly 23 years ago, the popular injectable contraceptive depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) has been associated with causing substantial weight gain in some adolescent girls. Without being able to identify or predict which girls will gain weight on the drug, physicians typically counsel all teens receiving DMPA to simply eat less. New research suggests that the message may need to change to “eat better.”

Newswise:Video Embedded experimental-urban-garden-helps-cancer-survivors-lower-risk-for-recurrence-and-chronic-illness
VIDEO
Released: 8-Dec-2015 8:30 AM EST
Experimental “Urban Garden” Helps Cancer Survivors’ Lower Risk for Recurrence and Chronic Illness
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

While there is substantial evidence that diet and body weight can impact cancer development, recurrence, and progression – for the estimated 14.5 million cancer survivors in the US, there are few resources available to help them optimize their dietary patterns and lifestyle behaviors after active cancer treatment is over. Now, new research shows that cancer survivors who participated in a multifaceted urban garden intervention improved their health behaviors, significantly reduced their weight, and improved biomarkers of health – all major improvements related to a reduced risk for developing a secondary cancer or illnesses like diabetes or heart disease. The unique program is promising and could be used as an evidence-based blueprint for other chronic conditions.

Newswise: Researchers Gather to Share Healthcare Innovations Worth Spreading at
Ohio State’s First-Ever “BRUTx” Event
Released: 6-Oct-2015 8:00 AM EDT
Researchers Gather to Share Healthcare Innovations Worth Spreading at Ohio State’s First-Ever “BRUTx” Event
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

First ever BRUTx event shares researchers' personal experiences that have led to healthcare innovations ranging from life-saving apps to the next cure for diabetes, to discovering solutions for the the world's global health problems in an Ethiopian village.

Newswise: Cashiers May Have Higher Risk for BPA Exposure Than General Population
Released: 25-Aug-2015 7:05 AM EDT
Cashiers May Have Higher Risk for BPA Exposure Than General Population
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

The use of Bisphenol A (BPA) in plastic has been on the decline amid growing concerns that the compound’s estrogen-mimicking properties may cause dangerous hormonal disruptions. Despite the reduction, BPA remains a ubiquitous substance, found in thousands of products. Cashiers who frequently handle thermal printed receipts may be exposed to higher levels of BPA than the general population. For the first time, researchers are studying this workforce segment to measure how their exposure may differ from that of the general population.

Released: 30-Jun-2015 8:05 AM EDT
Researchers Repurpose Technology to Reduce Psychological and Physical Scars of Burn Injuries
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

It’s the season for backyard grilling, campfires, fireworks – and burn injuries. Over the next few months, U.S. burn centers will see thousands of severe burns requiring painful skin grafts and lengthy treatment. Researchers are developing new ways to use already approved therapies to help alleviate the anxiety and pain of burn treatments – as well as improve outcomes.

Newswise:Video Embedded bioengineered-patch-molecular-booster-could-help-stem-cells-treat-heart-failure
VIDEO
Released: 17-Jun-2015 8:30 AM EDT
Bioengineered Patch, Molecular “Booster” Could Improve Stem Cells Ability Treat Heart Failure
Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Despite the intense activity and high hopes that surround the use of stem cells to reverse heart disease, scientists still face multiple roadblocks before the treatment will be ready for clinical prime time. Researchers are now finding ways to maximize the healing potential of stem cells by helping them overcome the inhospitable conditions of a damaged heart – bringing the promise of stem cell therapy for heart disease one step closer to reality.


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