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Newswise: Perceptions About Body Image Linked to Increased Alcohol, Tobacco Use for Teens

Article ID: 676856

Perceptions About Body Image Linked to Increased Alcohol, Tobacco Use for Teens

University of Missouri Health

Virginia Ramseyer-Winter, assistant professor of social work, found negative body image is associated with increased tobacco and alcohol use, with implications for both young men and women.

Released:
21-Jun-2017 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 676340

MU Doctor Reminds Wire BBQ Grill Brushes Can Cause Injuries

University of Missouri Health

Wire-bristle grill brushes are used frequently for cleaning food residue from grill grates, but loose bristles can fall off the brush during cleaning and end up in the grilled food. If consumed, wire bristles can lead to injuries in the mouth, throat and tonsils. An otolaryngologist at MU Health Care would like to remind the public that these injuries can be prevented.

Released:
13-Jun-2017 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 675770

Telehealth Reduces Wait Time, Improves Care for Children with Autism Living in Remote Areas

University of Missouri Health

Kristin Sohl, director of ECHO Autism, says that the expanding ECHO Autism will help families and children with autism around the world, especially those living in remote areas.

Released:
1-Jun-2017 2:05 PM EDT
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Newswise: Health Care Process a Roadblock for Adolescents with Autism and Their Caregivers

Article ID: 675679

Health Care Process a Roadblock for Adolescents with Autism and Their Caregivers

University of Missouri Health

Nancy Cheak-Zamora, assistant professor of health sciences at MU, says that as more children with autism enter adulthood, improved communication between providers, adolescents and caregivers is needed to help those with autism make adult health care decisions.

Released:
31-May-2017 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 675282

First-of-Its-Kind Study Shows How Hand Amputation, Reattachment Affect Brain

University of Missouri Health

When a person loses a hand to amputation, nerves that control sensation and movement are severed, causing dramatic changes in areas of the brain that controlled these functions. As a result, areas of the brain devoted to the missing hand take on other functions. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri have found evidence of specific neurochemical changes associated with lower neuronal health in these brain regions. Further, they report that some of these changes in the brain may persist in individuals who receive hand transplants, despite their recovered hand function.

Released:
24-May-2017 12:05 PM EDT
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Research Results

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Neuro, Surgery, Transplantation,

Newswise: Study Reveals Recommendations for Certifying Emotional Support Animals

Article ID: 674981

Study Reveals Recommendations for Certifying Emotional Support Animals

University of Missouri Health

Little consensus exists when it comes to the certification of “emotional support animals” (ESAs). These animals usually have little or no specific training, which poses a challenge for mental health professionals who are asked to certify them. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have conducted a survey to examine what techniques and instruments mental health professionals are using to aid in their determinations of whether certification of an ESA is appropriate.

Released:
18-May-2017 11:05 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 674939

Rare Feline Genetic Disorders Identified Through Whole Genome Sequencing at MU

University of Missouri Health

Whole genome sequencing (WGS), which is the process of determining an organism’s complete DNA sequence, can be used to identify DNA anomalies that cause disease. Identifying disease-causing DNA abnormalities allows clinicians to better predict an effective course of treatment for the patient. Now, in a series of recent studies, scientists at the University of Missouri are using whole genome sequencing through the 99 Lives Cat Genome Sequencing Consortium to identify genetic variants that cause rare diseases, such as progressive retinal atrophy and Niemann-Pick type 1, a fatal disorder in domestic cats. Findings from the study could help feline preservationists implement breeding strategies in captivity for rare and endangered species such as the African black-footed cat.

Released:
17-May-2017 4:55 PM EDT
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Newswise: Exposure to BPA Potentially Induces Permanent Reprogramming of Painted Turtles’ Brains

Article ID: 674920

Exposure to BPA Potentially Induces Permanent Reprogramming of Painted Turtles’ Brains

University of Missouri Health

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical that is used in a variety of consumer products, such as food storage containers, water bottles and certain resins. In previous studies, Cheryl Rosenfeld, an investigator in the Bond Life Sciences Center, along with other researchers at the University of Missouri, Westminster College and the Saint Louis Zoo, determined that BPA can disrupt sexual function and behavior in painted turtles. Now, the team has identified the genetic pathways that are altered as a result of BPA exposure during early development.

Released:
17-May-2017 2:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 674293

Fighting Cancer: New Microscopic Technique Could Help Detect, Diagnose Metastatic Melanomas

University of Missouri Health

The fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. For years, melanoma researchers have studied samples that were considered uniform in size and color, making them easier to examine by more conventional means. But melanomas don’t always come in the same shape and hue; often, melanomas are irregular and dark, making them difficult to investigate. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have devised a new tool to detect and analyze single melanoma cells that are more representative of the skin cancers developed by most patients. The study, recently reported in Analyst published by the Royal Society of Chemistry, outlines the new techniques that could lead to better and faster diagnoses for the life-threatening disease.

Released:
8-May-2017 10:05 AM EDT
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Newswise: Biomarker Test for Lou Gehrig’s Disease Useful in Diagnosing Canine Neurodegenerative Disease

Article ID: 674297

Biomarker Test for Lou Gehrig’s Disease Useful in Diagnosing Canine Neurodegenerative Disease

University of Missouri Health

In 2009, Joan Coates, a veterinary neurologist, along with other researchers at the University of Missouri and the Broad Institute at MIT/Harvard, found a genetic link between degenerative myelopathy (DM) in dogs and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease in people. Now, MU researchers Coates and Michael Garcia, an associate professor in the Division of Biological Sciences, have found that a biomarker test that helps diagnose ALS also can assist with determining a diagnosis for degenerative myelopathy.

Released:
8-May-2017 10:05 AM EDT
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