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Newswise: Crystal Light: New Family of Light-Converting Materials Points to Cheaper, More Efficient Solar Power and LEDs
Released: 29-Jan-2015 4:00 PM EST
Crystal Light: New Family of Light-Converting Materials Points to Cheaper, More Efficient Solar Power and LEDs
University of Toronto

Engineers have shone new light on an emerging family of solar-absorbing materials that could clear the way for cheaper and more efficient solar panels and LEDs. The materials, called perovskites, are particularly good at absorbing visible light, but had never been thoroughly studied in their purest form: as perfect single crystals. Using a new technique, researchers grew large, pure perovskite crystals and studied how electrons move through the material as light is converted to electricity.

Newswise: Record Number of Female First-Year Students Join Canada’s Top-Ranked Engineering School
Released: 28-Jan-2015 6:00 AM EST
Record Number of Female First-Year Students Join Canada’s Top-Ranked Engineering School
University of Toronto

Women now account for 30.6 per cent of first-year students in U of T Engineering programs: a record for the Faculty and a number that surpasses all other Ontario universities. It is the only engineering school in Ontario with female first-year enrollment of more than 30 per cent. National figures are expected later this year from Engineers Canada.

Newswise:Video Embedded machine-learning-reveals-unexpected-genetic-roots-of-cancers-autism-and-other-disorders
VIDEO
Released: 18-Dec-2014 2:00 PM EST
Machine Learning Reveals Unexpected Genetic Roots of Cancers, Autism and Other Disorders
University of Toronto

University of Toronto researchers from Engineering, Biology and Medicine teach computers to ‘read the human genome’ and rate likelihood of mutations causing disease, opening vast new possibilities for medicine

Released: 20-Nov-2014 11:00 AM EST
Education Empowers Canadians but Raises Risks of Overwork and Work-Family Stress
University of Toronto

The higher your level of education, the greater your earnings and your sense of “personal mastery” or being in control of your fate, University of Toronto researchers say. But wait: there’s a downside.

Newswise:Video Embedded genetic-testing-for-personalized-nutrition-leads-to-better-outcomes
VIDEO
Released: 19-Nov-2014 12:35 PM EST
Genetic Testing for Personalized Nutrition Leads to Better Outcomes
University of Toronto

Personalized dietary advice based on a person’s genetic makeup improves eating habits compared to current “one-size-fits-all” dietary recommendations, says a University of Toronto researcher.

Newswise:Video Embedded real-tremors-or-drug-seeking-patient-new-app-can-tell
VIDEO
25-Aug-2014 11:00 AM EDT
Real Tremors, or Drug-Seeking Patient? New App Can Tell
University of Toronto

New iPod smart phone app developed by University of Toronto measures frequency of tremors in alcoholics.

19-Aug-2014 4:00 AM EDT
New Research Helps Explain Why Elderly Are Prone to Sleep Problems
University of Toronto

Reported online today in the journal Brain, findings from researchers at the University of Toronto and Harvard University show that a group of inhibitory neurons, whose loss leads to sleep disruption in experimental animals, are substantially diminished among the elderly and individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.

3-Jul-2014 12:05 AM EDT
One Third of Adults with Dyslexia Report They Were Physically Abused During Their Childhood
University of Toronto

Adults who have dyslexia are much more likely to report they were physically abused before they turned 18 than their peers without dyslexia, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill.

Newswise: New Class of Nanoparticle Brings Cheaper, Lighter Solar Cells Outdoors
Released: 9-Jun-2014 10:00 AM EDT
New Class of Nanoparticle Brings Cheaper, Lighter Solar Cells Outdoors
University of Toronto

Researchers in the University of Toronto’s Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering have designed and tested a new class of solar-sensitive nanoparticle that outshines the current state of the art employing this new class of technology. This new form of solid, stable light-sensitive nanoparticles, called colloidal quantum dots, could lead to cheaper and more flexible solar cells, as well as better gas sensors, infrared lasers, infrared light emitting diodes and more.

Released: 6-Jun-2014 10:30 AM EDT
University of Toronto Biologists Pave the Way for Improved Epilepsy Treatments
University of Toronto

University of Toronto biologists leading an investigation into the cells that regulate proper brain function, have identified and located the key players whose actions contribute to afflictions such as epilepsy and schizophrenia. The discovery is a major step toward developing improved treatments for these and other neurological disorders.

Released: 15-May-2014 2:00 PM EDT
Quantum Simulator Gives Clues About Magnetism
University of Toronto

Thywissen’s lab has revealed some of these answers in a new paper about the magnetism and diffusion of atoms in ultracold gases, published in the journal Science. The researchers optically trapped a cloud of gas a billion times colder than air in a very low-pressure vacuum.

8-May-2014 7:00 AM EDT
One in 25 Middle School Children Binge Drinking
University of Toronto

Four percent of Canadians aged 12 to 14 years old had consumed five or more drinks on at least one occasion in the preceding year, according to a new study from the University of Toronto. The study was published this week in the journal ISRN Public Health. The findings also indicated that the odds of binge drinking were twice as high among youth with three or more chronic conditions.

Released: 6-May-2014 10:00 AM EDT
University of Toronto Researchers Find Seeing ‘Jesus in Toast’ Phenomenon Perfectly Normal
University of Toronto

Researchers have found that the phenomenon of “face pareidolia”--where onlookers report seeing images of Jesus, Virgin Mary, or Elvis in objects such as toasts, shrouds, and clouds--is normal and based on physical causes.

22-Apr-2014 6:00 AM EDT
Sleep Behavior Disorder Linked to Brain Disease
University of Toronto

Researchers at the University of Toronto say a sleep disorder that causes people to act out their dreams is the best current predictor of brain diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

Released: 16-Apr-2014 10:00 AM EDT
Toddlers ‘Surprisingly Sophisticated’ at Understanding Unfamiliar Accents
University of Toronto

A new University of Toronto study has found that by two years of age, children are remarkably good at comprehending speakers who talk with accents the toddlers have never heard before.

Released: 26-Mar-2014 10:00 AM EDT
Parental Addictions Associated with Adult Children’s Arthritis
University of Toronto

The adult offspring of parents who were addicted to drugs or alcohol are more likely to have arthritis, according to a new study by University of Toronto researchers. Investigators examined a group of 13,036 adults and found that 20.4 per cent of respondents had been diagnosed with arthritis by a medical professional.

Released: 25-Mar-2014 10:00 AM EDT
Kids’ Books Featuring Animals with Human Traits Lead to Less Learning of the Natural World
University of Toronto

A new study by University of Toronto researchers has found that kids’ books featuring animals with human characteristics not only lead to less factual learning but also influence children’s reasoning about animals. Researchers also found that young readers are more likely to attribute human behaviors and emotions to animals when exposed to books with anthropomorphized animals than books depicting animals realistically.

Released: 21-Mar-2014 10:00 AM EDT
Computers Spot False Faces Better Than People
University of Toronto

A joint study by researchers at the University of California San Diego and the University of Toronto has found that a computer system spots real or faked expressions of pain more accurately than people can. The work, titled “Automatic Decoding of Deceptive Pain Expressions,” is published in the latest issue of Current Biology.

Released: 5-Mar-2014 5:05 PM EST
Thirty Per Cent of Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder Report Childhood Physical Abuse
University of Toronto

Thirty percent of adults with Attention Deficit Disorder or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) report they were physically abused before they turned 18. This compares to seven per cent of those without ADD/ADHD who were physically abused before 18.

Released: 4-Mar-2014 11:00 AM EST
HIV/STI Prevention Program in Haiti Is Changing and Saving Lives
University of Toronto

New research from the University of Toronto shows that a little training can go a long way in a desperate situation.

Released: 26-Feb-2014 10:00 AM EST
3D Microgels “on-Demand” Offer New Potential for Cell Research, the Future of Personalized Medicine
University of Toronto

Stars, diamonds, circles. Rather than your average bowl of Lucky Charms, these are three-dimensional cell cultures generated by an exciting new digital microfluidics platform, the results of which have been published in Nature Communications

Released: 24-Feb-2014 3:15 PM EST
New Study Shows a Genetic Link Between Feeding Behaviour and Animal Dispersal
University of Toronto

New research from the University of Toronto Scarborough shows that animal dispersal is influenced by a gene associated with feeding and food search behaviours. The study, which was carried out by UTSC Professor Mark Fitzpatrick and PhD student Allan Edelsparre, provides one of the first aimed at gaining a functional understanding of how genes can influence dispersal tendencies in nature.

Released: 20-Feb-2014 11:00 AM EST
New Research Shows the Way a Room Is Lit Can Affect the Way You Make Decisions
University of Toronto

The next time you want to turn down the emotional intensity before making an important decision, you may want to dim the lights first. A new study from the University of Toronto Scarborough shows that human emotion, whether positive or negative, is felt more intensely under bright light.

Released: 5-Feb-2014 5:00 PM EST
Food Insecurity Leads to Increased Incidence of Tuberculosis in Zimbabwe
University of Toronto

The rise of tuberculosis (TB) in Zimbabwe during the socio-economic crisis of 2008-9 has been linked to widespread food shortage, according to a new study led by Canadian researchers from the University of Toronto Dalla Lana School of Public Health published in PLOS ONE.

Released: 3-Feb-2014 3:00 PM EST
Research Shows That Reported Oil Sands Emissions Greatly Underestimated
University of Toronto

A new comprehensive modeling assessment of contamination in the Athabasca Oil Sands Region indicates that officially reported emissions of certain highly hazardous air pollutants have been greatly underestimated.

Released: 23-Jan-2014 2:00 PM EST
Liars Find It More Rewarding to Tell Truth Than Fib When Deceiving Others
University of Toronto

A University of Toronto report based on two neural imaging studies that monitored brain activity has found individuals are more satisfied to get a reward from telling the truth rather than getting the same reward through deceit. These studies were published recently in the neuroscience journals Neuropsychologia and NeuroImage.

Released: 15-Jan-2014 5:00 PM EST
Theory Behind Popular Blood-Type Diet Debunked
University of Toronto

Researchers from the University of Toronto (U of T) have found that the theory behind the popular blood type diet--which claims an individual’s nutritional needs vary by blood type--is not valid. The findings are published this week in PLoS One.

Released: 15-Jan-2014 3:40 PM EST
Finding Pleasure in Productive Activities the Key to Boosting Self-Control
University of Toronto

A new study from the University of Toronto Scarborough shows that while people have a harder time controlling themselves when tired, it doesn’t mean they’ve exhausted all of their willpower. The key to boosting self-control is finding pleasure in the necessary activities of life.

Released: 15-Jan-2014 2:00 PM EST
Ray of Hope for Magazines in Digital Era
University of Toronto

While print media continue to suffer at the hands of their online counterparts, new research from the University of Toronto Scarborough finds that print magazines with companion websites are able to attract more advertising dollars.

Released: 9-Jan-2014 10:00 AM EST
Remission From Depression Much Slower in Adults Who Were Abused in Childhood
University of Toronto

TORONTO, ON – Remission from depression is delayed in adults who have experienced childhood physical abuse or parental addictions, a new study by University of Toronto researchers has found. The study is published this week in the journal Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology. University of Toronto investigators examined a range of factors associated with remission in a sample of 1,128 depressed Canadian adults, drawn from the National Population Health Survey. Depressed individuals were followed every other year until remission occurred, for up to 12 years. “Our findings indicated that most people bounce back. In fact, three-quarters of individuals were no longer depressed after two years” reported co-author and Professor Emeriti Tahany M. Gadalla. However, not everyone recovered at the same rate.

Released: 9-Dec-2013 2:00 PM EST
New Long-Lived Greenhouse Gas Discovered by University of Toronto Chemistry Team
University of Toronto

Scientists from U of T’s Department of Chemistry have discovered a novel chemical lurking in the atmosphere that appears to be a long-lived greenhouse gas (LLGHG). The chemical – perfluorotributylamine (PFTBA) – is the most radiatively efficient chemical found to date, breaking all other chemical records for its potential to impact climate.

Newswise: Hummingbird Metabolism Unique in Burning Glucose and Fructose Equally
Released: 5-Dec-2013 2:20 PM EST
Hummingbird Metabolism Unique in Burning Glucose and Fructose Equally
University of Toronto

Hummingbird metabolism is a marvel of evolutionary engineering. These tiny birds can power all of their energetic hovering flight by burning the sugar contained in the floral nectar of their diet.

Newswise: Fear of Being Single Leads People to Settle for Less in Relationships
Released: 3-Dec-2013 12:00 PM EST
Fear of Being Single Leads People to Settle for Less in Relationships
University of Toronto

Fear of being single is a meaningful predictor of settling for less in relationships among both men and women, a new University of Toronto study has found. The results are published in the December edition of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Newswise: New Algorithm Finds You, Even in Untagged Photos
Released: 2-Dec-2013 10:00 AM EST
New Algorithm Finds You, Even in Untagged Photos
University of Toronto

A new algorithm designed at the University of Toronto has the power to profoundly change the way we find photos among the billions on social media sites such as Facebook and Flickr. This month, the United States Patent and Trademark Office will issue a patent on this technology. Developed by Parham Aarabi, a professor in The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and his former Master’s student Ron Appel, the search tool uses tag locations to quantify relationships between individuals, even those not tagged in any given photo.

Released: 29-Nov-2013 12:00 PM EST
Strong Dollar Means Cross-Border Shopping Heavily Influenced by Exchange Rate
University of Toronto

With the holiday shopping season in full swing it appears Canadians now more than ever are keeping a watchful eye on the exchange rate before heading south of the border to shop. Even a one cent increase in the exchange rate causes a disproportionate number of Canadians to go cross-border shopping, according to a new study from a team of researchers including University of Toronto Scarborough and Rotman School of Management professor Ambarish Chandra.

Newswise: Thin, Active Invisibility Cloak Demonstrated for First Time
Released: 12-Nov-2013 12:00 PM EST
Thin, Active Invisibility Cloak Demonstrated for First Time
University of Toronto

Invisibility cloaking is no longer the stuff of science fiction: two researchers in The Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering have demonstrated an effective invisibility cloak that is thin, scalable and adaptive to different types and sizes of objects.

11-Nov-2013 11:05 AM EST
Some “Healthy” Vegetable Oils May Actually Increase Risk of Heart Disease
University of Toronto

Some vegetable oils that claim to be healthy may actually increase the risk of heart disease, and Health Canada should reconsider cholesterol-lowering claims on food labelling, states an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.130253.

Released: 28-Oct-2013 4:15 PM EDT
Moderate Exercise Not Only Treats, but Prevents Depression
University of Toronto

Physical activity is being increasingly recognized as an effective tool to treat depression. PhD candidate George Mammen’s review published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has taken the connection one step further, finding that moderate exercise can actually prevent episodes of depression in the long term. This is the first longitudinal review to focus exclusively on the role that exercise plays in maintaining good mental health and preventing the onset of depression later in life.

Released: 17-Oct-2013 11:10 AM EDT
Depression Twice as Likely in Migraine Sufferers
University of Toronto

The prevalence of depression among those with migraine is approximately twice as high as for those without the disease (men: 8.4% vs. 3.4%; women 12.4% vs. 5.7%), according to a new study published by University of Toronto researchers.

Released: 19-Sep-2013 2:20 PM EDT
Can Financial Incentives Inspire Exercise?
University of Toronto

When it comes to sticking to an exercise plan, we're all looking for solutions to ensure that new healthy habits transform into long-term lifestyle changes. PhD candidate Marc Mitchell has published findings in the September online issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine suggesting that receiving coupons and vouchers for as little as five dollars can help people stick to new fitness regimes.

Released: 19-Sep-2013 2:00 PM EDT
Overfishing of Sharks Is Harming Coral Reefs
University of Toronto

A team of scientists from Canada and Australia has discovered that a decline in shark populations is detrimental to coral reefs. “Where shark numbers are reduced due to commercial fishing, there is also a decrease in the herbivorous fishes which play a key role in promoting reef health,” said Jonathan Ruppert, a recent University of Toronto PhD graduate. Ruppert was part of a team engaged in long-term monitoring of reefs off Australia's northwest coast.

Released: 10-Sep-2013 11:00 AM EDT
Keep Stricter Audit Committee Standards Flexible, Argues New Study
University of Toronto

Independent, financially-literate audit committees lead to higher firm values and less diversion of resources by management, shows a new study by researchers at the University of Toronto. But the paper, which looked at small companies that voluntarily adopted standards required of larger companies, also says it’s important for regulators to stay flexible around rules requiring high-quality audit committees, particularly for smaller firms that may be hurt by expensive director compensation costs.

Released: 10-Sep-2013 11:00 AM EDT
Nymi by Bionym Launches Using Your Unique Heartbeat to Unlock Your World
University of Toronto

The next generation of biometric technology launches today with the Nymi, from Bionym, a technology start-up founded by University of Toronto engineering graduates. The Nymi is the world’s first wearable authentication device that uses your unique heartbeat to unlock your identity. The convenient and secure authentication is enabled through an embedded electrocardiogram (ECG) sensor. When the Nymi recognizes your personal ECG, it will communicate your identity to your devices. You remain authenticated until the Nymi is removed. The activated Nymi can then be used to gain access to all registered devices, completely bypassing passwords and PINs for seamless and secure access. Passwords, PINs and even keys and cards will become a thing of the past.

Released: 13-Aug-2013 10:00 AM EDT
Women Who Were Physically Abused During Childhood More Likely to Be Obese
University of Toronto

Women with a history of childhood physical abuse are more likely to become obese adults, according to a new study by University of Toronto researchers. Results indicate that women who were physically abused in childhood were more likely to be obese than women from non-abusive homes

Released: 29-Jul-2013 3:00 PM EDT
Childhood Physical Abuse Linked to Thyroid Disorders in Women
University of Toronto

Women who were victims of childhood physical abuse are more likely to develop thyroid conditions than women who were not maltreated during childhood, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto and the University of Hawaii. The study appears online in this week’s Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma.

Released: 22-Jul-2013 4:00 PM EDT
Vaccinating Boys Plays Key Role in HPV Prevention
University of Toronto

Improving vaccination rates against the human papillomavirus (HPV) in boys is key to protecting both men and women, says new research from University of Toronto Professor Peter A. Newman from the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. HPV has been linked to anal, penile and certain types of throat cancers in men. Since the virus is also responsible for various cancers in women, vaccinating boys aged 11 to 21 will play a crucial role in reducing cancer rates across the sexes.

Released: 12-Jun-2013 1:30 PM EDT
Self-Fertilizing Plants Contribute to Their Own Demise
University of Toronto

Many plants are self-fertilizing, meaning they act as both mother and father to their own seeds. This strategy – known as selfing – guarantees reproduction but, over time, leads to reduced diversity and the accumulation of harmful mutations. A new study published in the scientific journal Nature Genetics shows that these negative consequences are apparent across a selfing plant’s genome, and can arise more rapidly than previously thought.

Released: 12-Jun-2013 1:00 PM EDT
Tracking Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Real-Time
University of Toronto

New Canadian surveillance system monitors tuberculosis and could be used for SARS-like outbreaks.

Released: 9-May-2013 9:40 AM EDT
Parental Addictions Linked to Adult Children’s Depression
University of Toronto

The offspring of parents who were addicted to drugs or alcohol are more likely to be depressed in adulthood, according to a new study by University of Toronto researchers. In a paper published online in the journal Psychiatry Research this month, investigators examined the association between parental addictions and adult depression in a representative sample of 6,268 adults, drawn from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey. Of these respondents, 312 had a major depressive episode within the year preceding the survey and 877 reported that while they were under the age of 18 and still living at home that at least one parent who drank or used drugs “so often that it caused problems for the family”.

Released: 8-May-2013 10:00 AM EDT
Nearly 5 Million Asthmatics Worldwide Could Benefit From Antifungal Therapy
University of Toronto

An estimated 4,837,000 asthmatics with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) could benefit substantially from antifungal treatment, say researchers from the University of Toronto and Manchester University.


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