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26-Jun-2019 4:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 714484

Even People with Well-Controlled Epilepsy May Be at Risk for Sudden Death

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People with epilepsy have a rare risk of sudden death. A new study shows that risk may apply even to people whose epilepsy is well-controlled, which is contrary to previous, smaller studies that showed the risk was highest among those with severe, difficult-to-treat epilepsy. The new study is published in the June 19, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
17-Jun-2019 4:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jun-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713791

Brain Changes May Be Linked to Unexplained Motor Symptoms

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A new study finds that people who have movement problems, symptoms that cannot be explained by an underlying disease, may have chemical changes in specific areas of the brain. The study is published in the June 5, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. These symptoms, which include tremors, muscle contractions or problems with walking, are called functional or psychogenic motor symptoms.

Released:
31-May-2019 11:50 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    29-May-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713546

Could Repeated Squeezes to the Arms, Legs Protect the Brain?

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

What if wearing a blood pressure cuff could help prevent stroke? In a new study, people who restricted their blood flow by wearing inflated blood pressure cuffs on an arm and leg showed signs of more controlled blood flow to their brain, a process that could be protective if blood flow is more severely restricted in the event of a stroke, according at a study published in the May 29, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
28-May-2019 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 713094

Bipolar Disorder May Be Linked to Parkinson’s Disease

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

People who have bipolar disorder may be more likely to later develop Parkinson’s disease than people who do not have bipolar disorder, according at a study published in the May 22, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
17-May-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-May-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 712799

What’s Causing Your Vertigo? Goggles May Help with Diagnosis

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Vertigo is a form of severe dizziness that can result in a loss of balance, a feeling of falling, trouble walking or standing, or nausea. There is more than one type of vertigo, each with a different cause, and sometimes requiring different treatment. Now a proof-of-concept study has found that special goggles that measure eye movements during an episode of vertigo may help more accurately diagnose which type of vertigo a person has. The study is published in the May 15, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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13-May-2019 4:40 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    2-May-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 712056

Blood Pressure Drug Shows No Benefit in Parkinson’s Disease

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

A study of a blood pressure drug does not show any benefit for people with Parkinson’s disease, according to findings released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4 to 10, 2019. The drug isradipine had shown promise in small, early studies and hopes were high that this could be the first drug to slow the progression of the disease.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 1:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-May-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 712015

Out-of-Pocket Costs for Neurologic Medications Rise Sharply Over 12 Years

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

The amount of money people pay out-of-pocket for drugs to treat neurologic conditions like multiple sclerosis, dementia and Parkinson’s disease has risen sharply over 12 years, with the most dramatic increase for multiple sclerosis (MS) medications, according to a study published in the May 1, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study, funded by the American Academy of Neurology, found that average out-of-pocket costs for people taking MS drugs were 20 times higher in 2016 than they were in 2004.

Released:
26-Apr-2019 5:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    1-May-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 712055

Experimental Drug Shows Promise for Genetic Form of ALS

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

An early stage trial of an investigational therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) suggests that people could tolerate the experimental drug and, in exploratory results, the experimental drug was linked to possible slower progression in people with a genetic form of the disease caused by mutations in a gene called superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). The preliminary study released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4 to 10, 2019.

Released:
29-Apr-2019 1:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    30-Apr-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 712052

Cannabis-based Medicine May Reduce Seizures for Children with Difficult-to-Treat Epilepsy

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Taking a pharmaceutical formulation of cannabidiol, a cannabis-based medicine, cut seizures nearly in half for children with a rare and severe type of epilepsy called Dravet syndrome, according to a phase 3 study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 71st Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, May 4 to 10, 2019. Dravet syndrome, which starts in infancy, can lead to intellectual disability and frequent, prolonged seizures. Cannabidiol is derived from marijuana that does not include the psychoactive part of the plant that creates a “high.”

Released:
29-Apr-2019 1:00 PM EDT
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