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1-Sep-2020 12:25 PM EDT
When Doing Good Boosts Health, Well-Being
American Psychological Association (APA)

Performing acts of kindness and helping other people can be good for people’s health and well-being, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. But not all good-hearted behavior is equally beneficial to the giver. The strength of the link depends on many factors, including the type of kindness, the definition of well-being, and the giver’s age, gender and other demographic factors.

Released: 27-Aug-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Children Notice Race Several Years Before Adults Want to Talk About It
American Psychological Association (APA)

Adults in the United States believe children should be almost 5 years old before talking with them about race, even though some infants are aware of race and preschoolers may have already developed racist beliefs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

20-Aug-2020 10:50 AM EDT
When it comes to supporting candidates, ideology trumps race and gender
American Psychological Association (APA)

Voters who express prejudice against minorities and women are still more likely to support candidates who most closely align with their ideologies, regardless of the race or sex of such candidates, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

30-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study: Experiencing Childhood Trauma Makes Body and Brain Age Faster
American Psychological Association (APA)

Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. The study examined three different signs of biological aging--early puberty, cellular aging and changes in brain structure--and found that trauma exposure was associated with all three.

9-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Black Women Often Ignored by Social Justice Movements
American Psychological Association (APA)

Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Prospective teachers misperceive Black children as angry
American Psychological Association (APA)

Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 18-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
More Than 80% of Americans Report Nation’s Future Is Significant Source of Stress, Survey Says
American Psychological Association (APA)

More than 8 in 10 Americans (83%) say the future of our nation is a significant source of stress, according to the American Psychological Association’s most recent survey report, Stress in AmericaTM 2020: Stress in The Time of COVID-19, Volume Two. The previous high was 69%, reported in 2018 as part of APA’s annual Stress in America survey.

2-Jun-2020 2:40 PM EDT
New Zealanders' attitudes changed after pandemic lockdown
American Psychological Association (APA)

In the first few weeks of the lockdown of New Zealand in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, residents reported a slight increase in mental distress but higher levels of confidence in the government, science and the police, as well as greater.

Released: 21-May-2020 2:35 PM EDT
APA Stress in America Report: High Stress Related to Coronavirus is the New Normal for Many Parents
American Psychological Association (APA)

Nearly half of parents of children under age 18 say their stress levels related to the coronavirus pandemic are high, with managing their kids’ online learning a significant source of stress for many, according to a new survey by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 24-Mar-2020 1:05 PM EDT
APA to states, insurers: Provide access to mental health care during COVID-19 public health crisis
American Psychological Association (APA)

The American Psychological Association called on states and insurers to move quickly to allow people to connect with their mental health providers remotely using telehealth as the need for mental health services rises during the COVID-19 pandemic.

12-Mar-2020 3:30 PM EDT
People Prone to Disengage from Difficult Tasks and Goals May Experience Greater Cognitive Decline After Retirement
American Psychological Association (APA)

Certain middle-aged and older adults, especially women who tend to disengage from difficult tasks and goals after they retire, may be at greater risk of cognitive decline as they age, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 25-Feb-2020 1:45 PM EST
Weight-Based Bullying Linked to Increased Adolescent Alcohol, Marijuana Use
American Psychological Association (APA)

Adolescents who are bullied about their weight or body shape may be more likely to use alcohol or marijuana than those who are not bullied, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 10-Feb-2020 3:25 PM EST
Improving Eyewitness Identification Key to Protecting Innocent People
American Psychological Association (APA)

Law enforcement officials can reduce mistakes by eyewitnesses to crimes if they follow a series of recommendations that include interviewing witnesses as soon as possible after a crime and videotaping the session, according to the American Psychology-Law Society, a division of the American Psychological Association.

Newswise: Majority of U.S. Adults Believe Climate Change Is Most Important Issue Today
Released: 6-Feb-2020 1:35 PM EST
Majority of U.S. Adults Believe Climate Change Is Most Important Issue Today
American Psychological Association (APA)

As the effects of climate change become more evident, more than half of U.S. adults (56%) say climate change is the most important issue facing society today, yet 4 in 10 have not made any changes in their behavior to reduce their contribution to climate change, according to a new poll by the American Psychological Association.

4-Feb-2020 5:00 PM EST
Religious, Moral Beliefs May Exacerbate Concerns About Porn Addiction
American Psychological Association (APA)

Moral or religious beliefs may lead some people to believe they are addicted to pornography even when their porn use is low or average, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

28-Jan-2020 4:20 PM EST
People May Lie to Appear Honest
American Psychological Association (APA)

People may lie to appear honest if events that turned out in their favor seem too good to be true, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

23-Jan-2020 1:30 PM EST
Strict Adherence to Traditional Masculinity Associated with More Severe PTSD in Vets
American Psychological Association (APA)

To help service members perform better in the field, military training emphasizes the importance of certain traits associated with traditional masculinity, including suppression of emotion and self-reliance. But when veterans return home, strict adherence to these traits can become detrimental, leading to more severe post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms and making it more difficult to treat, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 23-Jan-2020 12:20 PM EST
When Caregivers Need Care
American Psychological Association (APA)

People who regularly care for or assist a family member or friend with a health problem or disability are more likely to neglect their own health, particularly by not having insurance or putting off necessary health services due to cost, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association.

10-Dec-2019 1:10 PM EST
Students Do Better in School When They Can Understand, Manage Emotions
American Psychological Association (APA)

Students who are better able to understand and manage their emotions effectively, a skill known as emotional intelligence, do better at school than their less skilled peers, as measured by grades and standardized test scores, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

5-Dec-2019 10:40 AM EST
Loneliness May Be Due to Increasing Aging Population
American Psychological Association (APA)

Despite some claims that Americans are in the midst of a “loneliness epidemic,” older people today may not be any lonelier than their counterparts from previous generations – there just might be more of them, according to a pair of studies published by the American Psychological Association.

13-Nov-2019 12:25 PM EST
Personality Traits Affect Retirement Spending
American Psychological Association (APA)

How quickly you spend your savings in retirement may have as much or more to do with your personality than whether you have a lot of debt or want to leave an inheritance.

Released: 7-Nov-2019 4:10 PM EST
Older Adults Find Greater Well-Being in Smaller Social Networks, Study Finds
American Psychological Association (APA)

Are younger adults who cultivate numerous connections with friends, families and acquaintances through online social networks any happier than older adults who have smaller circles of face-to-face relationships? The answer may be no, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

5-Nov-2019 10:00 AM EST
Bloodlines May Matter More Than Love When It Comes to Health
American Psychological Association (APA)

Strained relationships with parents, siblings or extended family members may be more harmful to people’s health than a troubled relationship with a significant other, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 5-Nov-2019 12:05 AM EST
Health Care, Mass Shootings, 2020 Presidential Election Causing Americans Significant Stress, New Stress in America™ Survey Finds
American Psychological Association (APA)

A year before the 2020 presidential election, Americans report various issues in the news as significant sources of stress, including health care, mass shootings and the upcoming election, according to this year’s Stress in America™ survey by the American Psychological Association (APA). More than half of U.S. adults (56%) identify the 2020 presidential election as a significant stressor, an increase from the 52% of adults who reported the presidential election as a significant source of stress when asked in the months leading up to the 2016 contest.

24-Oct-2019 5:00 PM EDT
Middle-Aged Adults with Borderline Personality Disorder Potentially at Higher Risk for Heart Attacks, Study Says
American Psychological Association (APA)

Middle-aged adults who show symptoms of borderline personality disorder may be at greater risk for a heart attack, as they show physical signs of worsening cardiovascular health more than other adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

23-Oct-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Women CEOs Judged More Harshly Than Men for Corporate Ethical Failures
American Psychological Association (APA)

People are less likely to support an organization after an ethical failure if the business is led by a woman, according to a study published by the American Psychological Association. However, organizations led by women endure less negative backlash for competence failures than those headed by men.

16-Oct-2019 3:15 PM EDT
Statement of APA President Marking World Poverty Day
American Psychological Association (APA)

Following is the statement of Rosie Phillips Davis, PhD, president of the American Psychological Association, marking World Poverty Day: “World Poverty Day represents an opportunity for us to examine our biases, move beyond our individual selves and identify the systemic, underlying mechanisms driving income insecurity. Psychological science can help address the structural barriers and cognitive processes that perpetuate poverty and generate solutions."

Released: 3-Oct-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Arizona State’s McNamara First Editor of New Open-Access APA Journal
American Psychological Association (APA)

Danielle S. McNamara, PhD, has been named the inaugural editor of the new journal Technology, Mind, and Behavior, to be published by the American Psychological Association.

23-Sep-2019 4:35 PM EDT
Positive Relationships Boost Self-Esteem, and Vice Versa
American Psychological Association (APA)

Does having close friends boost your self-esteem, or does having high self-esteem influence the quality of your friendships? Both, according to a meta-analysis of more than two decades of research, published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 19-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Highlights of American Psychological Association Conference on Technology, Mind and Society
American Psychological Association (APA)

The conference will focus on efforts to understand and shape the interactions of human beings and technology. Topics to be presented include whether virtual reality is ready for primetime, how fake news persists on social media, the use of games to enhance psychotherapy, how wearable technology may help improve well-being at work, and how technology can help people successfully age.

11-Sep-2019 2:05 PM EDT
Violent Video Games Blamed More Often for School Shootings By White Perpetrators
American Psychological Association (APA)

People are more likely to blame violent video games as a cause of school shootings by white perpetrators than by African American perpetrators, possibly because of racial stereotypes that associate minorities with violent crime, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 26-Aug-2019 3:10 PM EDT
American Psychological Association Conference on Technology, Mind and Society
American Psychological Association (APA)

Technology, Mind and Society – an interdisciplinary conference exploring the links between psychology and technology

Released: 21-Aug-2019 2:45 PM EDT
APA Statement on Expected Rule Eliminating 20-Day Limit on Detaining Immigrant Children
American Psychological Association (APA)

Following is the statement of Jaime “Jim” Diaz-Granados, PhD, deputy CEO of the American Psychological Association, regarding the administration’s expected decision to withdraw from the Flores Settlement Agreement, which limited to 20 days the time immigrant children can be held in custody:

Released: 12-Aug-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Poor Fit Between Job Demands, Reasoning Abilities Associated with Chronic Health Conditions
American Psychological Association (APA)

Older workers whose reasoning abilities no longer allow them to meet the demands of their jobs may be more likely to develop chronic health conditions and retire early, which may not be ideal for the employee or employer, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

2-Aug-2019 12:55 PM EDT
Psychology Can Help Prevent Deadly Childhood Accidents
American Psychological Association (APA)

Injuries have overtaken infectious disease as the leading cause of death for children worldwide, and psychologists have the research needed to help predict and prevent deadly childhood mishaps, according to a presentation at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

2-Aug-2019 12:50 PM EDT
Why Stress and Anxiety Aren't Always Bad
American Psychological Association (APA)

People generally think of stress and anxiety as negative concepts, but while both stress and anxiety can reach unhealthy levels, psychologists have long known that both are unavoidable -- and that they often play a helpful, not harmful, role in our daily lives, according to a presentation at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

2-Aug-2019 12:40 PM EDT
Climate Change Conversations Can Be Difficult for Both Skeptics, Environmentalists
American Psychological Association (APA)

Having productive conversations about climate change isn’t only challenging when dealing with skeptics, it can also be difficult for environmentalists, according to two studies presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

1-Aug-2019 2:50 PM EDT
Older Adults More Likely to Condemn Even Accidental Harm
American Psychological Association (APA)

As people get older, they are more likely to condemn and want to punish others for acts that cause harm, even if no harm was intended, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

1-Aug-2019 2:40 PM EDT
Regular Exercise May Slow Decline in Those at Risk of Alzheimer's
American Psychological Association (APA)

Moderate exercise is not only good for memory as people age, it also appears to help prevent the development of physical signs of Alzheimer’s, known as biomarkers, in those who are at risk for the disease, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

1-Aug-2019 2:25 PM EDT
When Working with Animals Can Hurt Your Mental Health
American Psychological Association (APA)

While it might sound like fun to work around pets every day, veterinarians and people who volunteer at animal shelters face particular stressors that can place them at risk for depression, anxiety and even suicide, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

1-Aug-2019 2:10 PM EDT
Food Insecurity Common Across U.S. Higher Education Campuses
American Psychological Association (APA)

Many university and college students across the U.S. report lacking access to a reliable supply of nutritious food, a concept known as food insecurity, which can affect their ability to learn, according to research presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association.

Released: 6-Aug-2019 8:45 AM EDT
Seventh Edition of APA's Best-Selling Publication Manual to Publish in October with a 700,000 First Printing
American Psychological Association (APA)

The long-expected seventh edition of the best-selling Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association will go on sale in October, with a first printing of 700,000 copies, APA announced at the opening of APA 2019, the association’s 127th annual convention.

Released: 5-Aug-2019 4:25 PM EDT
Statement of APA CEO on Gun Violence and Mental Health
American Psychological Association (APA)

Following is the statement of Arthur C. Evans Jr., PhD, CEO of the American Psychological Association, in reaction to President Trump’s statements today regarding gun violence and mental illness:

Released: 5-Aug-2019 3:55 PM EDT
Psychologists Available to Talk About Gun Violence, Hate Crimes, Radicalization
American Psychological Association (APA)

For reporters covering aspects of the shootings in El Paso and Dayton, these psychologists are available to discuss issues associated with gun violence, domestic terrorism, radicalization, hate crimes and coping with trauma after a mass shooting.

Released: 5-Aug-2019 2:20 PM EDT
Young Teens of Color More Likely to Avoid Peers with Mental Illness
American Psychological Association (APA)

Students identifying as black or Latino are more likely to say they would socially distance themselves from peers with a mental illness, a key indicator of mental illness stigma, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. The findings reinforce how stigma may prevent teens who face prejudice and discrimination from seeking help for a mental health problem when they need it.

30-Jul-2019 3:45 PM EDT
Middle-School Latino Children Report More Depressive Symptoms After Family Member Arrested, Study Finds
American Psychological Association (APA)

Latino children who experience the immigration-related arrest of a family member report more severe levels of depression than those who don’t have such an experience, especially if one or both parents are undocumented, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 25-Jul-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Psychologists Helping Communities Address Gun Violence
American Psychological Association (APA)

Special session at APA's Annual Convention focuses on how psychology can have an impact on one of society's biggest problems

22-Jul-2019 2:25 PM EDT
Missile Strike False Alarm Most Stressful for Less Anxious Hawaiians, Study Finds
American Psychological Association (APA)

After learning that a warning of a missile headed to Hawaii was a false alarm, the most anxious local Twitter users calmed down more quickly than less anxious users, according to a study of tweets before, during and after the event, published by the American Psychological Association..


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