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Released: 25-Sep-2009 9:00 AM EDT
Young Adults Visit Doctors Least at an Age When Risky Behavior Peaks
University of Rochester Medical Center

The prevalence of substance abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, homicide and motor vehicle crashes all peak in young adulthood. Yet the study’s findings show that young adults under use ambulatory medical care, infrequently receive preventive care and rarely receive counseling directed at the greatest threats to their health.

24-Sep-2009 12:40 PM EDT
Viagra Relatives May Shrink Abnormally Large Hearts
University of Rochester Medical Center

Compounds related to Viagra, which is already in clinical trials to prevent heart failure, may also counter the disease in a different way, according to a study published online today in the journal Circulation Research. The results hold promise for the design of a new drug class and for its potential use in combination with Viagra or beta blockers.

2-Sep-2009 9:00 AM EDT
Study Results Promise Faster Recovery from Life-Threatening Blood Cell Shortages
University of Rochester Medical Center

A key compound resupplies bone marrow with fast-acting stem cells that can more quickly rekindle blood cell production, according to a study published online today in the journal Blood. While the study was in mice, in the study authors say it has the potential to increase survival among patients with life-threatening blood cell shortages.

Released: 1-Sep-2009 2:00 PM EDT
Trial Reports on New Therapy That Prevents Heart Failure
University of Rochester Medical Center

Patients who had a cardiac resynchronization device combined with a defibrillator (CRT-D) implanted had a 34 percent reduction in their risk of death or heart failure when compared to patients receiving only an implanted cardiac defibrillator (ICD), according to a landmark study published online today in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented today at the European Society of Cardiology Congress (ESC) in Barcelona, Spain.

23-Jul-2009 3:15 PM EDT
Common Food Dye May Hold Promise in Treating Spinal Cord Injury
University of Rochester Medical Center

A study today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that a common food additive that gives M&Ms and Gatorade their blue tint may offer promise for preventing the additional "“ and serious "“ secondary damage that immediately follows a traumatic injury to the spinal cord.

Released: 20-Jul-2009 3:45 PM EDT
Breast Cancer Drug Shows Promise Against Serious Infections
University of Rochester Medical Center

An FDA-approved drug used for preventing recurrence of breast cancer shows promise in fighting life-threatening fungal infections common in immune-compromised patients, such as infants born prematurely and patients with cancer.

Newswise: Genetic Source of Muscular Dystrophy Neutralized
Released: 16-Jul-2009 2:40 PM EDT
Genetic Source of Muscular Dystrophy Neutralized
University of Rochester Medical Center

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center have found a way to block the genetic flaw at the heart of a common form of muscular dystrophy. The results of the study, which were published today in the journal Science, could pave the way for new therapies that essentially reverse the symptoms of the disease.

Released: 30-Apr-2009 10:00 AM EDT
Brain Protein Central to Both Parkinson's, Drug Addiction Identified
University of Rochester Medical Center

Scientists have identified a protein that appears not only to be central to the process that causes Parkinson's disease but could also play a role in muting the high from methamphetamine and other addictive drugs.

Newswise: Scientists Discover Way to Jumpstart Bone's Healing Process
9-Apr-2009 9:00 AM EDT
Scientists Discover Way to Jumpstart Bone's Healing Process
University of Rochester Medical Center

An early study has found the osteoporosis drug teriparatide (Forteo) enabled aging patients confined to wheelchairs by non-healing fractures to walk and live independently again. The physicians involved are using the word "miraculous" to describe this stem cell-related work and its profound impact on the treatment of bone injuries.

Newswise:Video Embedded rigorous-visual-training-teaches-the-brain-to-see-again-after-stroke
VIDEO
30-Mar-2009 9:00 AM EDT
Rigorous Visual Training Teaches the Brain to See Again After Stroke
University of Rochester Medical Center

By doing a set of vigorous visual exercises on a computer every day for several months, patients who had gone partially blind as a result of suffering a stroke were able to regain some vision.

Released: 25-Mar-2009 1:10 PM EDT
Oxycodone Effective Against Shingles Pain
University of Rochester Medical Center

The painkiller oxycodone is effective at treating the acute pain of shingles, an illness that often causes severe pain which can become long-lasting and sometimes even permanent. Good treatment is crucial. It's possible that the pain of shingles is more likely to become a long-term problem if the pain is not adequately treated initially.

Released: 23-Mar-2009 12:55 PM EDT
Astrocytes Help Separate Man from Mouse
University of Rochester Medical Center

A type of brain cell that was long overlooked by researchers embodies one of very few ways in which the human brain differs fundamentally from that of a mouse or rat. Human astrocytes are bigger, faster, and much more complex than those in mice and rats.

Released: 12-Mar-2009 8:45 AM EDT
Weighing the Options after Life-Altering Stroke
University of Rochester Medical Center

Choosing to have aggressive brain surgery after suffering a severe stroke generally improves the patients' lives and allows them to live longer.

Released: 26-Feb-2009 2:35 PM EST
A Worm-and-Mouse Tale: B Cells Deserve More Respect
University of Rochester Medical Center

By studying how mice fight off infection by intestinal worms "“ a condition that affects more than 1 billion people worldwide "“ scientists have discovered that the immune system is more versatile than has long been thought. The work with worms is opening a new avenue of exploration in the search for treatments against autoimmune diseases like diabetes and asthma.

Newswise: Updated Formula Measures Kidney Function More Accurately
Released: 24-Feb-2009 1:00 PM EST
Updated Formula Measures Kidney Function More Accurately
University of Rochester Medical Center

Children with chronic kidney disorder are often subjected to radioactivity and a large number of blood draws when clinicians measure how well their kidneys function. This process is also time-consuming and costly. A new formula has been developed that accurately estimates the level at which children's kidneys are working using height, gender and measuring variables from just a small sample of blood.

Released: 9-Feb-2009 11:30 AM EST
ACL Injury Prevention Program Successfully Tackling Growing Problem
University of Rochester Medical Center

The nation's first "“ and only "“ program aimed at taking a wide-scale community prevention approach to decrease non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears among female high school athletes is working, and as a result, is being expanded in Rochester, New York. The program, called PEP (Prevent injury, Enhance Performance), targets the prevention of one of the most serious knee injuries that can sideline athletic careers among females, who are at six to nine times greater risk than males to sustain an ACL tear.

Released: 8-Jan-2009 12:40 PM EST
Why Bladder Cancer Is Deadlier for Some
University of Rochester Medical Center

Bladder cancer is much more likely to be deadly for women and African-Americans, but the reasons long believed to explain the phenomenon account for only part of the differences for such patients compared to their white and male counterparts, according to results published in the Jan. 1 issue of the journal Cancer.

Released: 23-Dec-2008 8:00 AM EST
University of Rochester 2008 Research Retrospective
University of Rochester Medical Center

Here's an informal wrap-up of some of the highlights, mainly in the research realm, of 2008 at the University of Rochester. Happy holidays, and happy Festivus!

18-Dec-2008 3:05 PM EST
Cardiovascular Proteins Pose a Double Whammy in Alzheimer’s
University of Rochester Medical Center

Two proteins that work in tandem in the brain's blood vessels present a double whammy in Alzheimer's disease. Not only do the proteins lessen blood flow in the brain, but they also reduce the rate at which the brain is able to remove amyloid beta, the protein that builds up in toxic quantities in the brains of patients with the disease.

11-Dec-2008 11:00 AM EST
Charting HIV’s Rapidly Changing Journey in the Body
University of Rochester Medical Center

HIV is so deadly largely because it evolves so rapidly. With a single virus as the origin of an infection, most patients will quickly come to harbor thousands of different versions of HIV, all a little bit different and all competing with one another to most efficiently infect that person's cells. Now scientists have settled a longstanding question about just how HIV morphs in the body.

5-Dec-2008 6:00 AM EST
Breaking the Silence After a Study Ends
University of Rochester Medical Center

While an estimated 2.3 million people in the United States take part in clinical trials every year, there currently exists no formal requirement to inform them of study results, an oversight that leaves many participants confused, frustrated, and sometimes lacking information that may be important to their health. Now researchers have proposed a novel and effective approach to disseminate the results of clinical trials to study volunteers.

Newswise: Steering Diabetes Patients Through the Sweetest Season
Released: 20-Nov-2008 12:00 PM EST
Steering Diabetes Patients Through the Sweetest Season
University of Rochester Medical Center

November not only ushers in American Diabetes Month "“ it's also the unofficial start of the holiday season. Between now and New Year's, people with diabetes must navigate a tempting course of sugar-centric festivities, maintaining a delicate nutritional balance against all odds. One Rochester endocrinologist is showing them how.

Released: 19-Nov-2008 8:00 AM EST
New Compounds Aimed at Muscular Dystrophy
University of Rochester Medical Center

Using a drug-discovery technique in which molecules compete against each other for access to the target, scientists have identified several compounds that, in the laboratory, block the unwanted coupling of two molecules that is at the root of muscular dystrophy.

Released: 14-Nov-2008 1:00 PM EST
Researchers Identify Toehold for HIV’s Assault on Brain
University of Rochester Medical Center

Scientists have unraveled in unprecedented detail the cascade of events that go wrong in brain cells affected by HIV, a virus whose assault on the nervous system continues unabated despite antiviral medications that can keep the virus at bay for years in the rest of the body.

Newswise: Alzheimer’s Gene Slows Export of Toxic Protein
12-Nov-2008 4:00 PM EST
Alzheimer’s Gene Slows Export of Toxic Protein
University of Rochester Medical Center

The only known genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease slows down the brain's ability to export a toxic protein known as amyloid-beta that is central to the damage the disease causes, scientists have found. The research provides new clues into the workings of a protein known as apolipoprotein E4, or ApoE4, which increases the risk of getting Alzheimer's disease.

30-Oct-2008 9:15 PM EDT
Flu Shot Protects Kids – Even During Years with a Bad Vaccine Match
University of Rochester Medical Center

Children who receive all recommended flu vaccine appear to be less likely to catch the respiratory virus that the CDC estimates hospitalizes 20,000 children every year. This study found that, even though the 2003-2004 and 2004-2005 flu seasons had poor matches between the vaccine and the circulating flu strains, the shots were clearly protective during the 2004-2005 year and possibly even during the 2003-2004 year.

Released: 31-Oct-2008 1:00 PM EDT
Make the Holidays About More than Just Feasting
University of Rochester Medical Center

The holidays are often as wonderful as they are stressful not only for parents, but for kids as well. It can be easy to skip meals, eat too many treats, and loaf around. During the holidays, families should be especially careful not to lose their healthy eating habits.

23-Oct-2008 5:00 PM EDT
High Flu Vaccine Dose Boosts Immune Response in Elderly
University of Rochester Medical Center

Giving people age 65 and older a dose four times larger than the standard flu vaccine boosts the amount of antibodies in their blood to levels considered protective against the flu, more so than the standard flu vaccine does. The findings from a study of nearly 4,000 people were presented Oct. 26 at a national meeting on infectious diseases.

23-Oct-2008 5:00 PM EDT
Treatment Guidelines for Psoriatic Arthritis
University of Rochester Medical Center

Rheumatologists, dermatologists, and patient advocates have come together to publish the first-ever international guidelines for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, a disease that mainly affects people who have psoriasis but also some people without it.

20-Oct-2008 4:00 PM EDT
Find Sheds Light on Motor Neuron Diseases Like ALS
University of Rochester Medical Center

Scientists have identified a gene in mice that plays a central role in the proper development of one of the nerve cells that goes bad in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease, and some other diseases that affect our motor neurons.

17-Oct-2008 10:45 AM EDT
Uninsured Kids in Middle Class Have Same Unmet Needs as Poor
University of Rochester Medical Center

Uninsured children in families earning between approximately $38,000 and $76,000 a year are about as likely to go without any health care as uninsured children in poorer families.

Released: 17-Oct-2008 3:00 PM EDT
Respiratory Rhythms Can Help Predict Insomnia in Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer
University of Rochester Medical Center

Many women with breast cancer suffer from chronic insomnia and sleep disturbances. This is the first study to identify the parasympathetic nervous system -- respiratory rates and cortisol levels -- as predictors of sleep problems.

Released: 16-Oct-2008 12:25 PM EDT
A Potential Role for Cell Death in Age-Related Hearing Loss
University of Rochester Medical Center

Several genes that play a role in how our body's cells normally auto-destruct may play a role in age-related hearing loss.

24-Apr-2003 12:00 AM EDT
Cardiomyopathy Often Develops during First Year of Life
University of Rochester Medical Center

Contrary to claims in medical textbooks, children who develop cardiomyopathy are more likely to do so in the first year of life than later in childhood. The study, of nearly 500 children at 38 sites nationwide, also finds that gender, race and region play a role.

Released: 4-Apr-2003 12:00 AM EST
Adapting to Sandstorms, Other Threats to Our Senses
University of Rochester Medical Center

Soldiers confronting dust storms cope with a swirl of confusing sensory input not unlike that experienced by people in everyday life. Scientists have found that our brain's ability to cope with a hodgepodge of signals is even more robust than previously thought.

Released: 18-Mar-2003 12:00 AM EST
Lung Cancer Treatment Improves with Better Timing
University of Rochester Medical Center

Doctors have devised a new way to use chemotherapy and radiation on lung cancer that relies on precise timing to zap cancer cells when they're most vulnerable. Patients receive less toxic amounts of chemotherapy in tandem with daily radiation.

15-Mar-2003 12:00 AM EST
One-Two Molecular Punch at Root of Common Arthritis
University of Rochester Medical Center

Scientists have discovered the molecular forces that conspire to damage bone in patients with psoriatic arthritis. People with the disease are awash in cells that dissolve bone, and their joints have high amounts of a protein that persuades those cells to settle into joints.

Released: 28-Feb-2003 12:00 AM EST
Scientists Initiate New National Effort to Fight Parkinson's
University of Rochester Medical Center

Scientists from around the nation have come together in a coordinated national effort to pursue a new treatment for Parkinson's disease: gene therapy.

7-Feb-2003 12:00 AM EST
Curbing Cells' Auto-Destruct Signals to Stop Stroke
University of Rochester Medical Center

A compound already used to treat severe sepsis could open up a new approach for treating stroke. Activated protein C directly protects brain cells that normally die as a result of a stroke by curbing cells' auto-destruct program.

1-Feb-2003 12:00 AM EST
Help for Hot Flashes
University of Rochester Medical Center

A study of post-menopausal women who took the drug gabapentin to control hot flashes shows that it appears to be a safe and effective alternative to hormone replacement therapy.

29-Nov-2002 12:00 AM EST
Mercury in Vaccines Is at Safe Levels
University of Rochester Medical Center

The first detailed analysis of blood mercury levels in infants who received vaccines containing the preservative thimerosal indicates that blood levels of mercury in children are comfortably below current safety limits.

Released: 5-Nov-2002 12:00 AM EST
Smallpox Vaccine Study Targets Those Already Immunized
University of Rochester Medical Center

The University of Rochester Medical Center is leading a nationwide study of approximately 900 patients that will focus on adults who were vaccinated as children.

Released: 5-Nov-2002 12:00 AM EST
Prostate-Cancer Find Points To New Drug Target
University of Rochester Medical Center

Scientists have discovered that a medication used to treat advanced prostate cancer actually turns on a molecule known to cause cancerous cells to grow.

Released: 15-Oct-2002 12:00 AM EDT
High-Tech Study of Maggots Yields Cancer Clues
University of Rochester Medical Center

A rendezvous between the maggot and some of biology's hottest technology has yielded new clues about the signals that enable cancer cells to grow. A study of fruit-fly larvae has pinpointed a DNA sequence that largely controls when cells divide and multiply.

Released: 15-Oct-2002 12:00 AM EDT
New Oral Blood Thinner May Improve Care
University of Rochester Medical Center

A new oral anticoagulant, ximelagatran, was at least as effective as warfarin (commonly known as Coumadin) at preventing blood clots in the legs, and was easier to monitor, according to a study of 680 patients at 74 sites around North America.

Released: 8-Oct-2002 12:00 AM EDT
Spice May Protect Skin During Radiation for Cancer
University of Rochester Medical Center

Curcumin, a substance in curry long believed to have health benefits, seems to protect skin during radiation therapy, according to results of a pilot study with mice.

8-Oct-2002 12:00 AM EDT
Seat Belt Use Improves among African Americans
University of Rochester Medical Center

A new study of seat belt use among adults severely injured in motor vehicle crashes shows the gap between African Americans and Caucasians is nearly gone, at least in one large U.S. city.

Released: 14-Sep-2002 12:00 AM EDT
Novel "Antisense" Technology Targets Thrush
University of Rochester Medical Center

Chemists have invented a new type of "antisense" technology that provides a simpler and less expensive method to knock out RNA. For their first demonstration the team disabled in the test tube an RNA molecule from a microbe that causes thrush.

Released: 10-Sep-2002 12:00 AM EDT
After 9/11: Anxiety Plagues Children, Parents Aren't Connecting
University of Rochester Medical Center

Children and teens in the United States who were surveyed after the Sept. 11 attacks were significantly more worried about how to cope with stress than those surveyed before, while parents surveyed after 9/11 actually worried less about their children coping.

Released: 7-Sep-2002 12:00 AM EDT
Flawed Molecular Coding under Increasing Scrutiny by Scientists
University of Rochester Medical Center

There's little room for nonsense in medicine. Stopping even just a little molecular nonsense would open up new vistas for pharmaceutical companies and could help alleviate many types of disease, say scientists.


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