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‘Jumping genes’ help stabilize DNA folding patterns

Washington University in St. Louis

The DNA molecule inside the nucleus of any human cell is more than six feet long. To fit into such a small space, it must fold into precise loops that also govern how genes are turned on or off. New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that "jumping genes" play a surprising role in stabilizing the 3D folding patterns of the DNA molecule inside the cell’s nucleus.

Channels: All Journal News, Blood, Cell Biology, Genetics, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
24-Jan-2020 2:10 PM EST
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Newswise: High-Protein Diets Boost Artery-Clogging Plaque, Mouse Study Shows

High-Protein Diets Boost Artery-Clogging Plaque, Mouse Study Shows

Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis reveals how high-protein diets increase atherosclerosis, especially unstable plaque that increases the risk of a heart attack.

Channels: Cardiovascular Health, Heart Disease, Nutrition, Obesity, Weight Loss, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
23-Jan-2020 1:40 PM EST
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Green in tooth and claw

Washington University in St. Louis

Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors’ diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern tooth enamel from Washington University in St. Louis. The results have implications for reconstructing diet, and potentially for our interpretation of the fossil record of human evolution, researchers said.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, Oral Health, Scientific Reports,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 5:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Mutations in Donors’ Stem Cells May Cause Problems for Cancer Patients
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Mutations in Donors’ Stem Cells May Cause Problems for Cancer Patients

Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that extremely rare, harmful genetic mutations present in healthy donors’ stem cells — though not causing health problems in the donors — may be passed on to cancer patients receiving stem cell transplants, potentially creating health problems for the recipients. Among the concerns are heart damage, graft-versus-host disease and possible new leukemias.

Channels: Blood, Cancer, Stem Cells, Transplantation, All Journal News,

Released:
14-Jan-2020 12:00 PM EST
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Black Workers’ Status in a Company Informs Perceptions of Workplace Racial Discrimination

Washington University in St. Louis

“Research shows that black individuals encounter an enormous amount of racial discrimination in the workplace, including exclusion from critical social networks, wage disparities and hiring disadvantages,” said Adia Harvey Wingfield, co-author of the study “Getting In, Getting Hired, Getting Sideways Looks: Organizational Hierarchy and Perceptions of Racial Discrimination."

Channels: Healthcare, In the Workplace, Race and Ethnicity, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 2:40 PM EST
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Investigational drugs block bone loss in mice receiving chemotherapy
  • Embargo expired:
    13-Jan-2020 10:00 AM EST

Investigational drugs block bone loss in mice receiving chemotherapy

Washington University in St. Louis

Studying mice, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a driver of bone loss related to cancer treatment — cellular senescence. This process is independent of hormones related to bone health, such as estrogen. Such bone loss can be stopped by treating the mice with either of two investigational drugs already being evaluated in clinical trials.

Channels: Bone Health, Cancer, Children's Health, Healthcare, Men's Health, Women's Health, All Journal News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
10-Jan-2020 5:05 PM EST
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Newswise: SuperTIGER on its second prowl — 130,000 feet above Antarctica

SuperTIGER on its second prowl — 130,000 feet above Antarctica

Washington University in St. Louis

A balloon-borne scientific instrument designed to study the origin of cosmic rays is taking its second turn high above the continent of Antarctica three and a half weeks after its launch. SuperTIGER (Super Trans-Iron Galactic Element Recorder) is designed to measure the rare, heavy elements in cosmic rays that hold clues about their origins outside of the solar system.

Channels: Physics, Space and Astronomy, Technology,

Released:
10-Jan-2020 4:15 PM EST
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Toward a smarter way of recharging the aquifer

Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis have solved a mystery: How did arsenic show up in aquifer water that had been triple purified? Dissolved organic compounds.

Channels: Energy, Engineering, Environmental Science, Food and Water Safety, All Journal News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 11:05 AM EST
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WashU Expert: Soleimani killing likely unlawful

Washington University in St. Louis

Thousands of mourners have taken to the streets in Iran following the Jan. 3 death of Qasem Soleimani, commander of Iran’s Quds Force. Many questions remain following the U.S. drone strike in Iraq and Iran’s posturing about potential retaliation. Chief among them: Was the strike legal?“Unless there is much more to the story than meets the eye, the answer seems to be no,” said Leila Sadat, the James Carr Professor of International Criminal Law at Washington University in St.

Channels: Government/Law, U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. National Security, U.S. Politics, Iraq News, Middle East News,

Released:
7-Jan-2020 3:35 PM EST
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Law and Public Policy



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