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Newswise: China-sunset-600x400.jpg
Released: 6-Aug-2020 4:30 PM EDT
Social work’s role in the health, well-being of LGBTQ people in China
Washington University in St. Louis

As China’s government seeks solutions to social problems related to an evolving society, professional social work is increasingly entering new areas, including migrant and aging services, and is poised to take on a larger role in assisting lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people, said two experts from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Newswise:Video Embedded targeted-ultrasound-for-noninvasive-diagnosis-of-brain-cancer
VIDEO
Released: 6-Aug-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Targeted ultrasound for noninvasive diagnosis of brain cancer
Washington University in St. Louis

Brain tumors are typically diagnosed using MRI imaging, as taking a sample for a tissue biopsy is risky and may not be possible due to tumor location or a patient's health. Researchers are developing a method to diagnose brain tumors without any incisions.

Newswise: coronavirus-image1-300x300.jpg
Released: 6-Aug-2020 11:20 AM EDT
WashU Expert: Pandemic lessons from 2-1-1
Washington University in St. Louis

There have been more than 3.5 million requests for assistance to 2-1-1 help lines around the United States since the coronavirus pandemic hit this spring. The impact was immediate and dramatic, said a Brown School researcher who tracks calls to 2-1-1 help lines across the U.S.During COVID-19, the volume of requests to 2-1-1s has increased exponentially, said Matthew Kreuter, the Kahn Family Professor of Public Health at Washington University in St.

Newswise: Monkeying around: Study finds older primates father far fewer babies
Released: 5-Aug-2020 7:25 AM EDT
Monkeying around: Study finds older primates father far fewer babies
Washington University in St. Louis

Infertility is a worldwide clinical problem for human health that affects 8 to 12 percent of couples. A new study from Washington University in St. Louis has implications for understanding some age-related aspects of male reproductive health in primates, including humans. Older male rhesus monkeys sire fewer offspring, even though they appear to be mating as much as younger monkeys with similarly high social status.

Newswise: computernetwork.jpg
Released: 5-Aug-2020 7:15 AM EDT
Break it down: A new way to address common computing problem
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis have developed a new algorithm for solving a common class of problem -- known as linear inverse problems -- by breaking them down into smaller tasks, each of which can be solved in parallel on standard computers.

Newswise: genincollagen-1522x1536.jpg
Released: 29-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
New insights into wound healing
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from a multidisciplinary team led by Washington University may provide new insights into wound healing, scarring and how cancer spreads.

Newswise: 20200721_MM
27-Jul-2020 3:30 PM EDT
Alzheimer’s protein in blood indicates early brain changes
Washington University in St. Louis

Two decades or more before symptoms arise, plaques of a sticky protein called amyloid begin forming in the brains of people later diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.

Released: 28-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
Survey results: Having a higher purpose promotes happiness, lowers stress
Washington University in St. Louis

When a company commits in writing to a statement of higher purpose, a new survey shows that it promotes the employees' well-being, more happiness and even lower stress from the COVID-19 pandemic. And when the workers write their own, the effects are even more substantial.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Skip generational distinctions like ‘millenials’ in workplace
Washington University in St. Louis

It’s time to nix the generational mindset in business, says a Washington University in St. Louis linguistic expert who participated in an elite, 15-member committee announcing July 21 its findings on what he calls “potentially harmful” categorizing. He was part of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine committee convened for this study.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Supply chain works better if you previously worked, studied together
Washington University in St. Louis

While most of the business world builds success from existing relationships, four scientists including Xiumin Martin from the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis crunched 12 years' worth of data to find that personal connections between suppliers and vendors particularly improves the efficiency of the supply chain. To be precise, such rapport results in better overall performance, less restrictive and longer-lasting contract terms, and crystallized communication.

Newswise: 2 immunotherapies merged into single, more effective treatment
Released: 23-Jul-2020 12:25 PM EDT
2 immunotherapies merged into single, more effective treatment
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have combined two immunotherapy strategies into a single therapy and found, in studies in human cells and in mice, that the two together are more effective than either alone in treating certain blood cancers, such as leukemia.

Newswise: Lab-made virus mimics COVID-19 virus
Released: 21-Jul-2020 4:35 PM EDT
Lab-made virus mimics COVID-19 virus
Washington University in St. Louis

Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have created a virus that infects cells and interacts with antibodies just like the COVID-19 virus, but lacks the ability to cause severe disease. This safer virus makes it possible for scientists who do not have access to high-level biosafety facilities to join the effort to find drugs or vaccines for COVID-19.

Released: 15-Jul-2020 5:10 PM EDT
Rewriting history: New evidence challenges Euro-centric narrative of early colonization
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from Washington University in St. Louis provides evidence that Indigenous people continued to live in southeastern U.S. and actively resist European influence for nearly 150 years after the arrival of Spanish explorers in the 1500s.

Newswise: ShortTermDistancing.jpg
Released: 15-Jul-2020 4:10 PM EDT
Social distancing and COVID-19: A law of diminishing returns
Washington University in St. Louis

Modeling from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis shows how social distancing could have better been implemented. The key? Longer periods of distancing would have helped — but only to a point. More needed to be done.

13-Jul-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Gut bacteria protect against mosquito-borne viral illness
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that mice infected with Chikungunya virus get less sick and are less likely to transmit the virus to mosquitoes if they have healthy gut microbiomes.

Released: 13-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Dream on
Washington University in St. Louis

Daydreaming and wandering thoughts can be a significant asset for employees in the workplace, depending upon certain attributes of the wanderer — specifically, if they are engaged in their profession or organization.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 5:20 PM EDT
Mothers’ paid work suffers during pandemic, study finds
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds early evidence that the pandemic has exacerbated -not improved - the gender gap in work hours, which could have enduring consequences for working mothers.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 11:20 AM EDT
Research shows businesses can win more customers, influence your friends
Washington University in St. Louis

New research involving Washington University in St. Louis, Harvard and the University of California, San Diego shows marketers could win more customers because existing customers may value the boost in their reputation among friends more than a “selfish” financial incentive.

Newswise: shutterstock_1658523400-300x300.jpg
Released: 9-Jul-2020 3:40 PM EDT
WashU Expert: America gains nothing by leaving WHO
Washington University in St. Louis

President Donald Trump’s recent announcement to suspend U.S. funding to, and withdraw from, the World Health Organization is “counter to our interests in addressing our needs to save the lives and further the health of Americans, as well as an abandonment of America’s position as a global leader,” says the director of Washington University in St.

Newswise: Global wildlife surveillance could provide early warning for next pandemic
8-Jul-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Global wildlife surveillance could provide early warning for next pandemic
Washington University in St. Louis

In a perspective article published July 9 in Science, a team of wildlife biologists, infectious disease experts, and others propose a decentralized, global wildlife biosurveillance system to identify – before the next pandemic emerges – animal viruses that have the potential to cause human disease.

Newswise: shutterstock_1211002564.jpg
Released: 9-Jul-2020 10:45 AM EDT
WashU Expert: WHO withdrawal may not be legal
Washington University in St. Louis

President Donald Trump announced July 7 that the United States has officially begun to withdraw from the World Health Organization (WHO). Trump may or may not have the authority to do so, says an expert on health law at Washington University in St. Louis.“It’s not clear that the president can unilaterally withdraw the United States from membership in the WHO,” said Rachel Sachs, associate professor of law and a renowned expert on health policy and drug law.

Newswise: Williams-Brent-cropped.jpg
Released: 8-Jul-2020 5:15 PM EDT
Signatory to letter to WHO focused on understanding virus transmission by aerosols
Washington University in St. Louis

On Monday, more than 230 scientists from around the world declared “It’s time to address airborne transmission of COVID-19.”In a letter signed by Washington University in St. Louis faculty and published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, directed toward “Most public health organizations, including the World Health Organization,” the scientists urged that public health organizations need to make recommendations beyond hand washing and mask-wearing.

Newswise: Experimental drug shows early promise against inherited form of ALS, trial indicates
8-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Experimental drug shows early promise against inherited form of ALS, trial indicates
Washington University in St. Louis

A clinical trial conducted at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and other sites has found evidence that the experimental drug tofersen lowers levels of a disease-causing protein in people with an inherited form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, caused by mutations in the gene SOD1.

Newswise: WashU Expert: Eviction moratoriums are incomplete solution
Released: 7-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
WashU Expert: Eviction moratoriums are incomplete solution
Washington University in St. Louis

Millions of tenants are at risk of eviction as protections in the CARES Act are set to expire. While the U.S. Congress and Senate are proposing plans to extend the federal moratorium on evictions, a finance expert at Washington University in St. Louis warns that is just one piece of the puzzle.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 6:05 PM EDT
WashU Expert: Electoral College ruling contradicts Founders’ ‘original intent’
Washington University in St. Louis

While the Supreme Court decision limits independence of electors and prevents potential uncertainty in 2020 election, it contradicts the Constitution framers’ intentions for the Electoral College, according to a political science expert at Washington University in St. Louis. 

Newswise: sharon-mccutcheon-8lnbXtxFGZw-unsplash-1024x683.jpg
Released: 6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
COVID-19 demonstrates why wealth matters
Washington University in St. Louis

While COVID-19 has impacted all individuals, the impact has not been equal. In a new national Socioeconomic Impact of COVID-19 survey, the Social Policy Institute at Washington University in St. Louis found that liquid assets increased the likelihood that an individual could practice social distancing. However, Black individuals were least likely to afford social distancing.

Newswise: Screen-Shot-2020-06-30-at-10.02.47-AM.png
Released: 30-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Brown School’s Race and Opportunity Lab recommends specific policing reforms
Washington University in St. Louis

As the nation struggles with police violence, a new report from HomeGrown StL in the Race and Opportunity Lab at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis recommends reforms to build an equitable, transparent and accountable public safety approach that will include lawsuit liability, a police misconduct database and federal funding mandates.

Newswise: giphy.gif
Released: 29-Jun-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Artificial intelligence identifies, locates seizures in real-time
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has shown that understanding brain activity as a network instead of readings from an EEG allow for more accurate and efficient detection of seizures in real-time.

Newswise: shutterstock_113014078.jpg
Released: 26-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Congress unlikely to act on police reform
Washington University in St. Louis

The U.S. House of Representatives and Senate are at a stalemate over enacting sweeping police reforms in the wake of the death of George Floyd and other Black Americans. The gulf between the Democratic and Republican proposed solutions is wide and neither side seems willing to bend, says a law expert on criminal reform at Washington University in St.

Newswise: Figure4_updatedPM25.jpg
Released: 25-Jun-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Global pollution estimates reveal surprises, opportunity
Washington University in St. Louis

Using recent satellite observations, ground monitoring and computational modeling, researchers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis have released a survey of global pollution rates. There are a couple of surprises, for worse, but also, for better.

Newswise: shutterstock_274907645.jpg
Released: 19-Jun-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Religion may offer protective role for black adolescent boys who experience police abuse
Washington University in St. Louis

In the wake of the deaths of George Floyd, Rayshard Brooks and many more, a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis finds that religion may offer a protective role for black adolescent boys who experience police abuse.

Released: 18-Jun-2020 7:30 PM EDT
Stroke survival rates worse in rural areas, study says
Washington University in St. Louis

A major U.S. study reveals large gaps between urban and rural patients in quality of care received after a stroke and rates of survival. In more rural areas, the ability of hospitals to deliver advanced stroke care is lower and mortality rates substantially higher, the research shows. The analysis, involving nearly 800,000 patients, was led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Newswise: immigration-law-book-photo.jpg
Released: 18-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
WashU Expert: DACA decision lets ‘Dreamers’ breathe a little easier
Washington University in St. Louis

The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision June 18 that the Trump Administration cannot shut down the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) program will allow more than 700,000 “Dreamers” to worry a bit less and continue focusing on their jobs, education and futures, said an immigration law expert at Washington University in St.

Newswise: RecordfuelCellVijay_lrg.jpg
Released: 17-Jun-2020 5:45 PM EDT
Engineers develop new fuel cells with twice the operating voltage as hydrogen
Washington University in St. Louis

Engineers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis have developed high-power, direct borohydride fuel cells that operate at double the voltage of conventional hydrogen fuel cells.

Released: 17-Jun-2020 7:30 AM EDT
Oral antibiotics work, shorten hospital stays for IV drug users with infections
Washington University in St. Louis

combination of IV and oral antibiotics can effectively treat invasive infections in people who inject illicit drugs, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings mean that patients who do not wish to stay in the hospital for weeks of IV antibiotic treatment can leave and complete taking their prescribed antibiotics at home.

Newswise: Previously undetected brain pulses may help circuits survive disuse, injury
15-Jun-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Previously undetected brain pulses may help circuits survive disuse, injury
Washington University in St. Louis

For the sake of research on brain and mobility, Nico Dosenbach, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, wore a cast on his right dominant arm despite not having an injury. He then underwent hours of MRI scans while wearing the cast, and for two weeks before and after. The MRI scans found previously undetected brain pulses. The researchers also found that disuse of an arm causes the affected brain region to disconnect from the rest of the brain’s motor system within two days. However, spontaneous pulses maintain activity in the disused circuits until the region becomes active again when mobility is regained.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Electrically charged dust storms drive Martian chlorine cycle
Washington University in St. Louis

This paper — from the group that previously examined Martian dust storms — shifts focus to the electrochemical processes resulting from dust storms that may power the movement of chlorine, which is ongoing on Mars today. The research was published May 28 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

8-Jun-2020 4:30 PM EDT
An Ion Channel Senses Cell Swelling and Helps Cells to Choose a Response
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from Washington University in St. Louis offers clues about how mechanosensitive ion channels in the plant’s cells respond to swelling by inducing cell death – potentially to protect the rest of the plant.

Newswise: COVID-19 mouse model will speed search for drugs, vaccines
Released: 10-Jun-2020 12:00 PM EDT
COVID-19 mouse model will speed search for drugs, vaccines
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a mouse model of COVID-19 that is expected to speed up the search for drugs and vaccines for the potentially deadly disease.

Newswise: micrometeoroids-760x189.png
Released: 9-Jun-2020 4:20 PM EDT
Ancient Micrometeoroids Carried Specks of Stardust, Water to Asteroid 4 Vesta
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis are the first to study presolar materials that landed on a planet-like body. Their findings may help solve the mystery: where did all the water on Earth come from?

Newswise: giphy.gif
Released: 5-Jun-2020 11:15 AM EDT
Silicon ‘neurons’ may add a new dimension to computer processors
Washington University in St. Louis

When it fires, a neuron consumes significantly more energy than an equivalent computer operation. And yet, a network of coupled neurons can continuously learn, sense and perform complex tasks at energy levels that are currently unattainable for even state-of-the-art processors.What does a neuron do to save energy that a contemporary computer processing unit doesn’t?Computer modelling by researchers at Washington University in St.

Newswise:Video Embedded antibiotic-destroying-genes-widespread-in-bacteria-in-soil-and-on-people
VIDEO
Released: 2-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Antibiotic-destroying genes widespread in bacteria in soil and on people
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have found that genes that confer the power to destroy tetracycline antibiotics are widespread in bacteria. But the researchers have also created a chemical compound that shields tetracyclines from destruction, restoring the antibiotics lethality. The findings indicate an emerging threat to one of the most widely used classes of antibiotics — but also a promising way to protect against that threat.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 1:55 PM EDT
How to build better highways in plants
Washington University in St. Louis

As a plant grows, it moves cellular material through transporter (motor) proteins along a highway system of microtubule tracks, moving cargo from its version of manufacturing sites to the cell wall construction zone. The Dixit lab found motor proteins necessary for track stability.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Suppression of COVID-19 spread is possible, suggests new model
Washington University in St. Louis

Suppression of the spread of COVID-19 is an attainable goal, and it can be done through strategies that ease social distancing guidelines, suggests a new model developed by researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the Brookings Institution.

Newswise: shutterstock_1517179706.jpg
Released: 28-May-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Study: Exposure to police violence may be more impactful for individuals who perceive police as a threat to their personal safety
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from the Race and Opportunity Lab in the Brown School’s Center for Social Development at Washington University in St. Louis sheds light on youths’ reactions to social media videos showing violence in their communities. “Exposure to police violence may be more impactful for individuals who perceive police as a threat to their personal safety,” the lead author said.

Released: 27-May-2020 7:50 PM EDT
Minimum Wage Increases a Mixed Bag, but ‘Not a Good Idea’ Amid Crisis
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers who have parsed minimum-wage increases over the past half-decade find a mixed bag of immediate results in states that push wages higher, but the pandemic-roiled economy changes all that, they say.

Newswise: ?c=1&o1=ro&url=https%3A%2F%2Fsource.wustl.edu%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F07%2FTrumpTalks.jpg
Released: 27-May-2020 3:25 PM EDT
WashU Expert: Trump attacks on Twitter betray free speech principles
Washington University in St. Louis

When President Donald Trump made unsubstantiated claims on Twitter May 26 about mail-in voting, it fact-checked him — inserting beneath his tweets a hyperlink to more information on the subject.President Trump then accused Twitter of “totally silenc[ing] conservatives [sic] voices” and threatened that “[w]e will strongly regulate, or close them down, before we can ever allow this to happen.

Newswise: shutterstock_326881388.jpg
Released: 26-May-2020 3:50 PM EDT
Lack of physical activity during COVID-19 may fuel childhood obesity, new study finds
Washington University in St. Louis

The childhood obesity rate in the United States may increase by 2.4% if school closures continue into December, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis. Having schools closed nationwide, children in the U.S. have missed their opportunity to participate in physical education classes and other school-based physical activities, such as recess and after-school sports programs.


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