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20-Feb-2020 8:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
18-Feb-2020 5:10 PM EST

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Newswise: Prebiotics help mice fight melanoma by activating anti-tumor immunity
  • Embargo expired:
    11-Feb-2020 11:00 AM EST

Prebiotics help mice fight melanoma by activating anti-tumor immunity

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that two prebiotics, mucin and inulin, slowed the growth of melanoma in mice by boosting the immune system’s ability to fight cancer. The study, published today in Cell Reports, provides further evidence that gut microbes have a role in shaping the immune response to cancer, and supports efforts to target the gut microbiome to enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Microbiome,

Released:
6-Feb-2020 4:35 PM EST
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Newswise: Why can’t Bertrand Might cry? Scientists offer an answer: missing water channels
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST

Why can’t Bertrand Might cry? Scientists offer an answer: missing water channels

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that cells from children with NGLY1 deficiency—a rare disorder first described in 2012—lack sufficient water channel proteins called aquaporins. The discovery was published in Cell Reports and may help explain the disorder’s wide-ranging symptoms—including the inability to produce tears, seizures and developmental delays—and opens new avenues to find therapies to treat the disorder.

Channels: Children's Health, Genetics, Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, Staff Picks, Cell (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 5:05 PM EST
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Newswise: Study reveals a new approach to enhancing response to immunotherapy in melanoma
  • Embargo expired:
    7-Jan-2020 5:00 AM EST

Study reveals a new approach to enhancing response to immunotherapy in melanoma

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have identified a new way to boost the immune system’s ability to fight cancer. The study used a mouse model to identify the importance of the Siah2 protein in the control of immune cells called T regulatory cells (Tregs), which limit the effectiveness of currently used immunotherapies. The research, which offers a new avenue to pursue immunotherapy in cases where the treatment fails, was published today in Nature Communications.

Channels: Cancer, Healthcare, Immunology, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
3-Jan-2020 11:40 AM EST
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Newswise: The secret to a long life? For worms, a cellular recycling protein is key
  • Embargo expired:
    11-Dec-2019 5:00 AM EST

The secret to a long life? For worms, a cellular recycling protein is key

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that worms live longer lives if they produce excess levels of a protein, p62, which recognizes toxic cell proteins that are tagged for destruction. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, could help uncover treatments for age-related conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease, which are often caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Cell Biology, Nature (journal), Grant Funded News,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 4:05 PM EST
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Newswise: One-two punch drug combination offers hope for pancreatic cancer therapy

One-two punch drug combination offers hope for pancreatic cancer therapy

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have identified a combination of two anti-cancer compounds that shrank pancreatic tumors in mice—supporting the immediate evaluation of the drugs in a clinical trial. U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved versions of the compounds are used today to treat certain leukemias and solid tumors, including melanoma. The study was published in Nature Cell Biology.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Pharmaceuticals, Digestive Disorders, Grant Funded News,

Released:
18-Nov-2019 11:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Sanford Burnham Prebys awarded $3.58 million NIH grant to advance potential treatment for opioid-use disorders
  • Embargo expired:
    23-Oct-2019 8:00 AM EDT

Sanford Burnham Prebys awarded $3.58 million NIH grant to advance potential treatment for opioid-use disorders

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), awarded a $3.58 million grant to Sanford Burnham Prebys scientist Anthony Pinkerton, Ph.D., to advance a potential treatment for opioid-use disorders, called SBI-553.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Public Health, Substance Abuse, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
21-Oct-2019 1:35 PM EDT
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Machine Learning’s Next Frontier: Epigenetic Drug Discovery

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have developed a machine-learning algorithm that gleans information from microscope images—allowing for high-throughput epigenetic drug screens that could unlock new treatments for cancer, heart disease, mental illness and more. The study was published in eLife.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Cardiovascular Health, Cell Biology, Heart Disease, Mental Health, Pharmaceuticals, Grant Funded News, Artificial Intelligence,

Released:
22-Oct-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: New Insights Into How to Protect Premature Babies From Common Brain Disorder
  • Embargo expired:
    9-Oct-2019 2:00 PM EDT

New Insights Into How to Protect Premature Babies From Common Brain Disorder

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Premature babies have delicate brain tissue that is prone to bleeding and can result in post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus, a dangerous condition that leads to excess fluid accumulation and brain dysfunction. Now, scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have identified a new disease mechanism and potential molecular drug target that may protect premature newborns from developing the brain disorder. The study was published in Science Advances.

Channels: Cell Biology, Children's Health, Neuro, All Journal News, Grant Funded News,

Released:
8-Oct-2019 4:05 PM EDT
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Newswise: $4.96 Million CIRM Grant Awarded to Sanford Burnham Prebys to Help the Tiniest Patients

$4.96 Million CIRM Grant Awarded to Sanford Burnham Prebys to Help the Tiniest Patients

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

The California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has awarded a $4.96 million grant to Sanford Burnham Prebys Professor Evan Y. Snyder, M.D., Ph.D. The funding will allow Snyder to complete pre-investigational new drug (IND)-enabling studies, a step toward securing U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a human trial for neural stem cells as a potential treatment for newborns who experience oxygen and blood-flow deprivation during birth. Called perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HII), the lack of oxygen and blood flow to the brain can cause cerebral palsy and other permanent neurological disorders.

Channels: Children's Health, Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells, All Journal News,

Released:
19-Aug-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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