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Article ID: 693183

Scientists Re-Create Brain Neurons to Study Obesity and Personalize Treatment

Cedars-Sinai

Scientists have re-created brain neurons of obese patients using "disease in a dish" technology, offering a new method to study the brain's role in obesity and possibly help tailor treatments to specific individuals.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693020

ALS Treatment Delays Disease and Extends Life in Rats

Cedars-Sinai

Investigators at Cedars-Sinai are exploring a new way to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by transplanting specially engineered neural cells into the brain. Their new study shows the transplanted cells delayed disease progression and extended survival in animal models.

Released:
17-Apr-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 692583

Renowned Surgeon, George Berci, Once a Conscripted Laborer for Nazis; Later Pioneered Developments Leading to a Medical Revolution of Minimally Invasive Surgeries

Cedars-Sinai

In 1942, George Berci was one of hundreds of Jewish conscripted laborers who were packed into a railroad car as human freight -- bound for a concentration camp. Berci survived the war and the subsequent 1956 Soviet invasion of Budapest. He went on to pioneer developments that led to a medical revolution of minimally invasive surgeries.

Released:
10-Apr-2018 9:05 PM EDT
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    9-Apr-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 692388

New Cardiac Imaging Technique Shortens Testing Time and Improves Patient Comfort, Potentially Increasing Diagnostic Accuracy for Heart Disease

Cedars-Sinai

EMBARGOED - A team of Cedars-Sinai investigators has developed a new technique for conducting cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tests that improves patient comfort, shortens testing time and has the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy and reliability.

Released:
6-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 691623

Brain's Tiniest Blood Vessels Trigger Spinal Motor Neurons to Develop

Cedars-Sinai

A new study has revealed that the human brain's tiniest blood vessels can activate genes known to trigger spinal motor neurons, prompting the neurons to grow during early development. The findings could provide insights into how amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and other neurodegenerative disorders may develop.

Released:
23-Mar-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 691154

Cedars-Sinai Investigator Awarded Grant to Study Esophageal Cancer

Cedars-Sinai

Dechen Lin, PhD, a research scientist in the Division of Hematology and Oncology in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine, has been awarded $175,000 from the Price Family Foundation and the DeGregorio Family Foundation for Gastric and Esophageal Cancer Research.

Released:
14-Mar-2018 10:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Mar-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 690813

Barbershop-based Healthcare Study Successfully Lowers High Blood Pressure in African-American Men

Cedars-Sinai

African-American men successfully lowered their high blood pressure to healthy levels when aided by a pharmacist and their local barber, according to a new study from the Smidt Heart Institute.

Released:
8-Mar-2018 2:45 PM EST
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Article ID: 690645

Cedars-Sinai Amputee Patient Gets "Bionic Leg"

Cedars-Sinai

Christopher Rowles, 59, was sidelined after losing half of his leg to amputation in 2011. Thanks to a new technique called osseointegration, he's back to pursuing his favorite hobby -- river fishing. Rowles is one of the first people in the country to undergo the novel procedure, which permanently anchors a titanium implant into the leg bone.

Released:
6-Mar-2018 12:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 690176

Cedars-Sinai Surgeon Uses Modern Technology to Solve Prehistoric Mystery of Saber-Toothed Cats

Cedars-Sinai

Orthopaedic surgeon Robert Klapper, MD, spends his days repairing worn-out hip joints. But examining the hip joint of an animal extinct for more than 12,000 years presented an entirely new challenge—and shed light on a long-running debate within paleontology about saber-toothed cats. Klapper is working with the paleontologists at the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum to unravel the mystery of how these giant cats lived and roamed. Using Cedars-Sinai’s most advanced CT scan machines, Klapper studied the pelvis and femurs of an extinct cat.

Released:
27-Feb-2018 5:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 690177

Cedars-Sinai Surgeon Uses Modern Technology to Solve Prehistoric Mystery of Saber-Toothed Cats

Cedars-Sinai

Orthopaedic surgeon, Robert Klapper, MD, is working with paleontologists at the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum to unravel the mystery of how long-extinct saber-toothed cats lived and roamed. Using Cedars-Sinai’s most advanced CT scan machines, Klapper studied the pelvis and femurs of an extinct cat. "The most modern technology allowed these bones to speak to us, and they had a lot to say," Klapper said.

Released:
27-Feb-2018 5:00 AM EST
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