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Newswise: Genetic Syndrome of Intellectual Disability Fixed in Mice Using Precision Epigenome Editing

Genetic Syndrome of Intellectual Disability Fixed in Mice Using Precision Epigenome Editing

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Using a targeted gene epigenome editing approach in the developing mouse brain, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers reversed one gene mutation that leads to the genetic disorder WAGR syndrome, which causes intellectual disability and obesity in people. This specific editing was unique in that it changed the epigenome — how the genes are regulated — without changing the actual genetic code of the gene being regulated.

Channels: All Journal News, Cognition and Learning, Genetics, Neuro, Obesity, Pharmaceuticals, Nature (journal), Grant Funded News,

Released:
11-Dec-2019 11:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Little Size Holds Big Impact: Johns Hopkins Scientists Develop Nanocontainer to Ship Titan-Size Gene Therapies And Drugs Into Cells
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Dec-2019 2:00 PM EST

Little Size Holds Big Impact: Johns Hopkins Scientists Develop Nanocontainer to Ship Titan-Size Gene Therapies And Drugs Into Cells

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have created a tiny, nanosize container that can slip inside cells and deliver protein-based medicines and gene therapies of any size — even hefty ones attached to the gene-editing tool called CRISPR. If their creation – constructed of a biodegradable polymer — passes more laboratory testing, it could offer a way to efficiently ferry larger medical compounds into specifically selected target cells.

Channels: All Journal News, Nanotechnology, Particle Physics, Physics, Grant Funded News,

Released:
4-Dec-2019 11:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Mouse Study Shows Nerve Signaling Pathway Critical to Healing Fractures

Mouse Study Shows Nerve Signaling Pathway Critical to Healing Fractures

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Sticks and stones may break one’s bones, but healing them requires the production of a protein signal that stimulates the generation, growth and spread of vital nerve cells, or neurons, throughout the injured area. That’s the finding of a recent Johns Hopkins Medicine study that used mice to demonstrate what likely takes place during human fracture repair as well.

Channels: All Journal News, Bone Health, Trauma, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
5-Dec-2019 11:00 AM EST
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Newswise: A Cancer Drug Trial For Dogs Presented At The RSNA Annual Meeting
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Dec-2019 4:00 PM EST

A Cancer Drug Trial For Dogs Presented At The RSNA Annual Meeting

Johns Hopkins Medicine

What do you do when your best friend is diagnosed with a cancer that kills most of its patients within a few months? A few brave dog owners turned to Johns Hopkins, where veterinarians, radiologists and physicists have teamed up to conduct an experimental trial of a therapy they hope will extend the lives of their beloved pets.

Channels: Cancer, Neuro, Pets, Veterinary Medicine, Medical Meetings,

Released:
1-Dec-2019 8:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Five Things Nobel Laureate Gregg Semenza Wishes Everyone Knew About Science

Five Things Nobel Laureate Gregg Semenza Wishes Everyone Knew About Science

Johns Hopkins Medicine

On Dec. 10, Johns Hopkins scientist Gregg Semenza, M.D., Ph.D., along with William Kaelin Jr., M.D., and Peter Ratcliffe, M.D., will accept the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm, Sweden, for the groundbreaking discovery of the gene that controls how cells respond to low oxygen levels.

Channels: All Journal News, Blood, Cancer, Cardiovascular Health, Diabetes, In the Workplace,

Released:
3-Dec-2019 8:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Helper Protein Worsens Diabetic Eye Disease

Helper Protein Worsens Diabetic Eye Disease

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a recent study using mice, lab-grown human retinal cells and patient samples, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they found evidence of a new pathway that may contribute to degeneration of the light sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. The findings, they conclude, bring scientists a step closer to developing new drugs for a central vision-destroying complication of diabetes that affects an estimated 750,000 Americans.

Channels: All Journal News, Diabetes, Pharmaceuticals, Vision, National Eye Institute (NEI), Grant Funded News,

Released:
27-Nov-2019 8:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Johns Hopkins Experts Available in Observance of World AIDS Day

Johns Hopkins Experts Available in Observance of World AIDS Day

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Nearly 40 million people around the world are living with HIV, and experts believe about 20% do not know their status. In the U.S., more than 1 million people in the U.S. are living with HIV.

Channels: AIDS and HIV, All Journal News, Children's Health, Public Health, Infectious Diseases,

Released:
26-Nov-2019 8:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Investigational Drug for People with Treatment-Resistant Epilepsy

Investigational Drug for People with Treatment-Resistant Epilepsy

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Imagine not being able to drive, shower alone or even work because you are never quite sure when the next seizure will leave you incapacitated. Hope may be on the horizon for epilepsy patients who have had limited success with seizure drugs. In a study, led by a Johns Hopkins lead investigator, of 437 patients across 107 institutions in 16 countries, researchers found that the investigational drug cenobamate reduced seizures 55% on the two highest doses of this medication that were tested over the entire treatment period.

Channels: All Journal News, Epilepsy, Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals,

Released:
21-Nov-2019 9:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Medicine to Host Maryland Hepatitis Summit

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Medicine to Host Maryland Hepatitis Summit

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In the United States, hepatitis C virus kills more people than HIV and 59 other infectious diseases combined. Maryland is one of the states hit hardest by the hepatitis C epidemic.

Channels: Infectious Diseases, Public Health,

Released:
21-Nov-2019 8:00 AM EST
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