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Newswise: Study Explores Link Between Methamphetamine Use And Risky Sexual Behavior
Released: 30-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study Explores Link Between Methamphetamine Use And Risky Sexual Behavior
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Recreational use of the illicit drug methamphetamine has long been associated with increases in overall impatient and risky behavior. Now, a new study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers affirms that meth use increases not only sexual desire but also, specifically and measurably, the risk of casual sex without a condom for those who have an increase in sexual desire.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 29-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Newswise: Flu Season Returns As The COVID-19 Pandemic Continues
Released: 23-Sep-2020 2:00 PM EDT
Flu Season Returns As The COVID-19 Pandemic Continues
Johns Hopkins Medicine

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues with no end in sight, the annual flu season emerges once again. Cases of the flu have already begun to surface around the nation, and there are some reports of co-infection with COVID-19. Johns Hopkins Medicine experts say now is the time to take action to fight against the flu. Doctors recommend that everyone age 6 months and older get the flu vaccine each year to prevent infection from the virus or reduce the severity of the illness.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Researchers Offer Lessons Learned From Early Covid-19 Patients
Released: 22-Sep-2020 3:00 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins Researchers Offer Lessons Learned From Early Covid-19 Patients
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Using a combination of demographic and clinical data gathered from seven weeks of COVID-19 patient care early in the coronavirus pandemic, Johns Hopkins researchers today published a “prediction model” they say can help other hospitals care for COVID-19 patients — and make important decisions about planning and resource allocations.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts On COVID-19
Released: 22-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts On COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the lockdown with COVID-19 restrictions in place, an interactive gaming room built to accelerate stroke patient recovery in The Johns Hopkins Hospital wasn’t getting much use. The therapists and neurologists running the gaming room decided to make the room available to staff treating COVID-19 patients to allow them to decompress.

Newswise: Study Affirms That Educational Intervention Before ‘First Sex’ Can Protect Sexual Health Of Black Males And Prevent Unwanted Pregnancies
Released: 21-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Study Affirms That Educational Intervention Before ‘First Sex’ Can Protect Sexual Health Of Black Males And Prevent Unwanted Pregnancies
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A new Johns Hopkins Medicine study adds to evidence that the earlier parents, educators and health care workers have age-appropriate and frank discussions about safe sex, the better will be their — and their partners’ — long-term sexual health and development. Specifically, the research concludes, these early interventions can lead to fewer unintended pregnancies.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 15-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Hosts Webinar Series About Gynecologic Cancers and Survivorship
Released: 9-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Johns Hopkins Hosts Webinar Series About Gynecologic Cancers and Survivorship
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In honor of Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month, the Johns Hopkins Medicine Kelly Gynecologic Oncology Service is hosting a series of 60-minute webinars during which top experts will address important issues related to gynecologic cancers and survivorship.

Newswise: Scientists Identify New Way To Target Some Rapidly Dividing Cancer Cells, Leaving Healthy Cells Unharmed
4-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Scientists Identify New Way To Target Some Rapidly Dividing Cancer Cells, Leaving Healthy Cells Unharmed
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of Oxford say they have found a new way to kill some multiplying human breast cancer cells by selectively attacking the core of their cell division machinery. The technique, so far tested only on lab-grown and patient-derived cancer cells, could advance efforts to find drugs that kill breast cancer cells in a subset of patients, and leave healthy cells unharmed.

Newswise: Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 8-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Front-line Worker Story: Ebony Hunter — Teamwork Will Get Us Through It seems there will never be enough “thank-you’s” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff members who are working around the clock to help patients who have COVID-19, the dangerous coronavirus disease. Their dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine.

Newswise: Flu Season Meets the COVID-19 Pandemic: Johns Hopkins Medicine Experts Available
Released: 8-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Flu Season Meets the COVID-19 Pandemic: Johns Hopkins Medicine Experts Available
Johns Hopkins Medicine

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact the world in sometimes devastating and unexpected ways, a more well-known illness — the flu — will make its annual debut in the coming weeks. Flu activity tends to increase in October and can run as late as May. It’s too soon to tell how flu season will definitively affect the current pandemic. However, Johns Hopkins Medicine experts say prevention will be key in reducing the spread of both illnesses, including getting an annual flu vaccine, washing hands, wearing a face mask or covering, and maintaining proper physical distancing.

Newswise: Tiny Biological Package Gets Drug Right To The ‘Heart’ Of Transplant Rejection
Released: 3-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Tiny Biological Package Gets Drug Right To The ‘Heart’ Of Transplant Rejection
Johns Hopkins Medicine

For patients who receive a heart transplant in the near future, the old adage, “Good things come in small packages,” may become words to live by. In a recent study, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) demonstrated in mice that they can easily deliver a promising anti-rejection drug directly to the area surrounding a grafted heart by packaging it within a tiny three-dimensional, protein gel cocoon known as a hydrogel. Best of all, the researchers say that the release of the drug is spread out over time, making it highly regulatable and eliminating the need for daily medication to keep rejection in check.

Newswise: Brain Cell Death in ALS, Dementia Tied to Loss of Key Biochemical Transport Structure in Nucleus
Released: 2-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Brain Cell Death in ALS, Dementia Tied to Loss of Key Biochemical Transport Structure in Nucleus
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers have long sought to explain precisely how the most common genetic mutation linked to both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia causes the death of nerve cells.

Newswise: Effective Cancer Immunotherapy Further Linked To Regulating A Cell ‘Suicide’ Gene
Released: 1-Sep-2020 1:00 PM EDT
Effective Cancer Immunotherapy Further Linked To Regulating A Cell ‘Suicide’ Gene
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have added to evidence that a gene responsible for turning off a cell’s natural “suicide” signals may also be the culprit in making breast cancer and melanoma cells resistant to therapies that use the immune system to fight cancer. A summary of the research, conducted with mice and human cells, appeared Aug. 25 in Cell Reports.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 1-Sep-2020 11:30 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Newswise: Cancer Cells Take Over Blood Vessels to Spread
Released: 1-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Cancer Cells Take Over Blood Vessels to Spread
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In laboratory studies, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University researchers observed a key step in how cancer cells may spread from a primary tumor to a distant site within the body, a process known as metastasis.

Newswise: Got Fatigue? Study Further Pinpoints Brain Regions That May Control It
Released: 26-Aug-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Got Fatigue? Study Further Pinpoints Brain Regions That May Control It
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine using MRI scans and computer modeling say they have further pinpointed areas of the human brain that regulate efforts to deal with fatigue. The findings, they say, could advance the development of behavioral and other strategies that increase physical performance in healthy people, and also illuminate the neural mechanisms that contribute to fatigue in people with depression, multiple sclerosis and stroke.

Newswise: Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 25-Aug-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

As COVID-19 continues to impact the world, health care professionals are finding more patients who were diagnosed with the illness but still are dealing with symptoms long after the initial infection has gone. This condition is sometimes referred to as “long COVID.”

Newswise: Study Adds To Evidence That Odor-Sensing Cells In The Nose Are The Key Entry Point For Sars Cov-2
Released: 20-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study Adds To Evidence That Odor-Sensing Cells In The Nose Are The Key Entry Point For Sars Cov-2
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine, experimenting with a small number of human cell samples, report that the “hook” of cells used by SARS-CoV-2 to latch onto and infect cells is up to 700 times more prevalent in the olfactory supporting cells lining the inside of the upper part of the nose than in the lining cells of the rest of the nose and windpipe that leads to the lungs. These supporting cells are necessary for the function/development of odor-sensing cells. The findings, from a preliminary study of cells lining both the nose and trachea, could advance the search for the best target for topical or local antiviral drugs to treat COVID-19, and offers further clues into why people with the virus sometimes lose their sense of smell.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 18-Aug-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas From Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Tuesday.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins ‘JustUs Dialogues’ Will Spotlight Critical Health and Justice Disparities
Released: 18-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins ‘JustUs Dialogues’ Will Spotlight Critical Health and Justice Disparities
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Five years ago, amid the grief and outrage surrounding the death of Freddie Gray, Johns Hopkins and the rest of Baltimore sharpened focus on making the city more just and equal. And last May, George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police sparked a historic reckoning around race and inequality in America. Beginning Thursday, Aug. 20 at 5:00 p.m., The Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Medicine will host a free online five-part series of discussions featuring many of the nation’s most important voices on this topic.

Newswise: Three Women Scientists at Johns Hopkins Tapped to Join Exclusive Research Network
Released: 17-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Three Women Scientists at Johns Hopkins Tapped to Join Exclusive Research Network
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Three Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists are among the first 45 members selected to join the 10x Genomics Visium Clinical Translational Research Network (CTRN), aimed at advancing translational research in some of the world’s leading health problems, including oncology, immuno-oncology, neuroscience, infectious disease, inflammation and fibrosis, and COVID-19.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 11-Aug-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Recently, several physicians hosted a press conference in which one physician claimed that the combination of hydroxychloroquine, the antibiotic azithromycin and the mineral zinc could cure COVID-19. The video footage of that press conference went viral on social media, and soon many social media platforms removed the videos for providing inaccurate, non-scientifically backed claims. But questions from the public may still remain.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 4-Aug-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Within a month following a heart attack, people are at increased risk for a second one. As a result, physicians treat these patients with medications to rapidly reduce cardiovascular risk factors for another event. Although statins are designed to reduce the risk from one underlying problem, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol, they often aren’t able drop it to recommended levels within 30 days. Now, testing a next-generation cholesterol-lowering drug known as a PCSK9 inhibitor, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers showed they could lower blood cholesterol to safer levels faster when it is added to traditional therapies.

Newswise:Video Embedded johns-hopkins-receives-35-million-in-funding-from-department-of-defense-for-covid-19-blood-plasma-trials
VIDEO
Released: 30-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Receives $35 Million in Funding from Department of Defense for Covid-19 Blood Plasma Trials
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers have received $35 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Joint Program Executive Office for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (JPEO-CBRND), on behalf of the Defense Health Agency, for two nationwide clinical trials to test the effectiveness of a convalescent blood plasma outpatient treatment. The treatment is a transfusion of a blood product from COVID-19 survivors that contains antibodies that may help the patient’s immune system fight the virus.

Newswise: Cholesterol-Lowering Drug Improved Function of Heart's Arteries
Released: 29-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Cholesterol-Lowering Drug Improved Function of Heart's Arteries
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a pilot study of people living with HIV or high levels of cholesterol, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that a six-week course of a cholesterol-lowering medication improved the function of the coronary arteries that provide oxygen to the heart.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 28-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

It seems there will never be enough “thank-yous” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff members who are working around the clock to help patients who have COVID-19, the dangerous coronavirus disease. Their dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine. As the mother of a 2-year-old, with responsibilities that sometimes require escorting COVID-19 patients at Sibley Memorial Hospital, Safety and Security Officer, SPO, Lolita Moore says she takes the necessary steps to protect herself and her family against the virus and prays daily. “I like that I can still be out helping people during the pandemic,” she says.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 23-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 21-Jul-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

It seems there will never be enough “thank you’s” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff members who are working around the clock to help patients who have COVID-19, the dangerous coronavirus disease. The dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine.

Newswise: Traditional PTSD Therapy Doesn't Trigger Drug Relapse
Released: 20-Jul-2020 8:45 AM EDT
Traditional PTSD Therapy Doesn't Trigger Drug Relapse
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins researchers have demonstrated that behavior therapy that exposes people to memories of their trauma doesn’t cause relapses of opioid or other drug use, and that PTSD severity and emotional problems have decreased after the first therapy session.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 14-Jul-2020 12:40 PM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Sharon Tapp, who worked as a nurse case manager at Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Washington, D.C., started experiencing sudden body weakness, chest pain, a high temperature and headache on March 18. Concerned, she went to her local urgent care center to find out what was wrong. They told her that these symptoms were flu-like, tested her for the coronavirus and told her to quarantine for 14 days. After five days and no difference in the presentation of her symptoms, the urgent care team contacted Sharon, letting her know that she tested positive for coronavirus and recommending that she go to the emergency department. Sharon’s family took her to Johns Hopkins Medicine’s Suburban Hospital. Because her condition worsened while at Suburban, she was transferred to The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore within 10 days of being admitted to Suburban Hospital.

Newswise: 7.13.2020WaunShaeOld_Hands__Elderly_GettyImages-962094878.jpg
Released: 13-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Family Caregiving May Not Harm Health of Caregivers After All
Johns Hopkins Medicine

For decades, family caregiving has been thought to create a type of chronic stress that may lead to significant health risks or even death, alarming potential caregivers and presenting a guilt-ridden obstacle for those needing help.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Newswise: Breast Cancer Cells Can Reprogram Immune Cells to Assist in Metastasis
9-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Breast Cancer Cells Can Reprogram Immune Cells to Assist in Metastasis
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have uncovered a new mechanism by which invasive breast cancer cells evade the immune system to metastasize, or spread, to other areas of the body. They propose that therapies targeting this process could be developed to halt or prevent metastasis and reduce breast cancer deaths.

Newswise: Scientists Use Nanoparticle-Delivered Gene Therapy to Inhibit Blinding Eye Disease in Rodents
Released: 7-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Scientists Use Nanoparticle-Delivered Gene Therapy to Inhibit Blinding Eye Disease in Rodents
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists use nanoparticle-delivered gene therapy to limit blinding retinal disease in rodents.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 2-Jul-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

It seems there will never be enough “thank you’s” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff members who are working around the clock to help patients who have the dangerous coronavirus disease. The dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 25-Jun-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Newswise: Women Underrepresented in Academic Hospital Medicine Leadership Roles, Study Finds
Released: 25-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Women Underrepresented in Academic Hospital Medicine Leadership Roles, Study Finds
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In recent years, the number of women who entered U.S. medical school surpassed the number of men. But gender inequities still exist in many areas of medicine. Of academic hospital medicine programs, 79% are run by men, Johns Hopkins researchers report in a new paper published March 3 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and male hospitalist leaders are more likely to have attained the rank of full professor than women leaders.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 23-Jun-2020 12:00 PM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

It seems there will never be enough “thank you’s” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff members who are working around the clock to help patients with the dangerous coronavirus disease. Their dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine.

Newswise: New Research Confirms Higher Rates of New Coronavirus in Latinx Populations
Released: 23-Jun-2020 8:15 AM EDT
New Research Confirms Higher Rates of New Coronavirus in Latinx Populations
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a new analysis of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, test results for nearly 38,000 people has found a positivity rate among Latinx populations about three times higher than for any other racial and ethnic group. The findings, published June 18 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), add to evidence that there are much higher COVID-19 infection rates among U.S. minorities, particularly in Latinx communities.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 18-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every Tuesday throughout the duration of the outbreak.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Medicine Announces Microsoft Azure Will Become Its Preferred Cloud Platform for Its inHealth Precision Medicine Initiative
Released: 18-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Medicine Announces Microsoft Azure Will Become Its Preferred Cloud Platform for Its inHealth Precision Medicine Initiative
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM) today announced a five-year relationship with Microsoft Corp. centered on Microsoft’s Azure and analytical tools that will support new discoveries, as part of JHM’s inHealth precision medicine initiative. The work will bring together JHM’s leading global research expertise with the power of Microsoft Azure and its artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities and flexible infrastructure to advance JHM’s discoveries that will benefit personalized health care. Johns Hopkins will maintain total control over its data.

Newswise: Light-Activated 'CRISPR' Triggers Precision Gene Editing and Super-Fast DNA Repair
Released: 17-Jun-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Light-Activated 'CRISPR' Triggers Precision Gene Editing and Super-Fast DNA Repair
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a series of experiments using human cancer cell lines, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have successfully used light as a trigger to make precise cuts in genomic material rapidly, using a molecular scalpel known as CRISPR, and observe how specialized cell proteins repair the exact spot where the gene was cut.

Newswise:Video Embedded loss-of-lipid-regulating-gene-fuels-prostate-cancer-spread
VIDEO
Released: 16-Jun-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Loss of Lipid-Regulating Gene Fuels Prostate Cancer Spread
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers from the Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences identified a lipid-regulating protein that conveys what the researchers describe as “superpowers” onto prostate cancer cells, causing them to aggressively spread.

Newswise: Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 16-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Story Tips From Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

It seems as though there will never be enough “thank-you’s” for the incredible doctors, nurses, technicians and support staff who are working around the clock to help patients with this dangerous coronavirus disease. Their dedication, determination and spirit enable Johns Hopkins to deliver the promise of medicine.

Newswise: Six Months In: Lessons Learned From Covid-19 and What’s Next
Released: 15-Jun-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Six Months In: Lessons Learned From Covid-19 and What’s Next
Johns Hopkins Medicine

As we near the six-month mark after the first confirmed COVID-19 case in the U.S., life as we know it has changed.

Newswise: Breaking Research News from Annual Meeting of American Society of Clinical Oncology
Released: 10-Jun-2020 1:15 PM EDT
Breaking Research News from Annual Meeting of American Society of Clinical Oncology
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center thoracic cancer and cancer genomics experts reported promising new findings and studies in mesothelioma, lung cancer and melanoma at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the world's leading professional organization for physicians and oncology professionals caring for cancer patients.

Newswise: COVID-19 Test That Relies on Viral Genetic Material Gives False Negative Results if Used Too Early in Those Infected
Released: 10-Jun-2020 8:00 AM EDT
COVID-19 Test That Relies on Viral Genetic Material Gives False Negative Results if Used Too Early in Those Infected
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a new study, Johns Hopkins researchers found that testing people for SARS-CoV-2 — the virus that causes COVID-19 — too early in the course of infection is likely to result in a false negative test, even though they may eventually test positive for the virus.


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