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Newswise: DEET Gives Humans an ‘Invisibilty Cloak’ to Fend Off Mosquito Bites

Article ID: 720901

DEET Gives Humans an ‘Invisibilty Cloak’ to Fend Off Mosquito Bites

Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

Since its invention during the Second World War for soldiers stationed in countries where malaria transmission rates were high, researchers have worked to pinpoint precisely how DEET actually affects mosquitos. Past studies have analyzed the chemical structure of the repellent, studied the response in easier insects to work with, such as fruit flies, and experimented with genetically engineered mosquito scent receptors grown inside frog eggs. However, the Anopheles mosquito’s neurological response to DEET and other repellents remained largely unknown because directly studying the scent-responsive neurons in the mosquito itself was technically challenging and labor-intensive work.

Released:
17-Oct-2019 11:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Changes in Chromosome Caps May be A Marker for Tumor Aggression in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

Article ID: 720842

Changes in Chromosome Caps May be A Marker for Tumor Aggression in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report that their study of tumor samples from people with the rare genetic syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) has uncovered novel molecular clues about which tumors are most likely to be aggressive in those with NF1. According to the researchers, the clues could advance the search for more customized and relevant treatments that spare patients exposure to treatments unlikely to work.

Released:
17-Oct-2019 8:20 AM EDT
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Newswise: Drug Treats Inflammation Associated With Genetic Heart Disease That Can Be Deadly in Young Athletes

Article ID: 720720

Drug Treats Inflammation Associated With Genetic Heart Disease That Can Be Deadly in Young Athletes

Johns Hopkins Medicine

When young athletes experiences sudden cardiac death as they run down the playing field, it’s usually due to arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), an inherited heart disease. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers have shed new light on the role of the immune system in the progression of ACM and, in the process, discovered a new drug that might help prevent ACM disease symptoms and progression to heart failure in some patients.

Released:
17-Oct-2019 8:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Proof-Of-Concept Experiments: Electrical Brain Implants Enable Man to Control Prosthetic Limbs With ‘Thoughts’

Article ID: 720833

Proof-Of-Concept Experiments: Electrical Brain Implants Enable Man to Control Prosthetic Limbs With ‘Thoughts’

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers say these efforts are believed to be the first demonstrations of success with bilateral sensorimotor intracortical implants, or brain-machine interfaces designed to power movement — but also to sense touch — in people with high spinal cord injuries.

Released:
16-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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Research Results

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Neuro, Surgery,

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English

Newswise: Flu Season Returns: Protect Yourself Now

Article ID: 720638

Flu Season Returns: Protect Yourself Now

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Cases of the flu are already on the rise around the nation as flu season begins. Johns Hopkins Medicine experts say now is the time to fight against the flu as the number of people getting sick from the potentially life-threatening virus will increase in the coming months. Doctors recommend everyone 6 months and older get the flu vaccine each year to prevent the virus or reduce the seriousness if you do get sick.

Released:
14-Oct-2019 11:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: Gregg Semenza Wins 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine For Hypoxia Discovery

Article ID: 720295

Gregg Semenza Wins 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine For Hypoxia Discovery

Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

Gregg L. Semenza, M.D., Ph.D., whose discoveries on how cells respond to low oxygen levels have the potential to result in treatments for a variety of illnesses, today was awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine by the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institutet. He shares the award with scientists William G. Kaelin, Jr., M.D. of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Peter J. Ratcliffe of Oxford University.

Released:
7-Oct-2019 11:30 AM EDT
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Newswise: MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Medicine Press Briefing for 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Article ID: 720289

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Medicine Press Briefing for 2019 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine

B-roll and photos are available for download here* WHAT: Press Briefing

Released:
7-Oct-2019 11:15 AM EDT
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Newswise: One Step Closer: Johns Hopkins Selects Architect For Early-Stage Planning Of Multidisciplinary Building In Honor Of Henrietta Lacks.

Article ID: 720262

One Step Closer: Johns Hopkins Selects Architect For Early-Stage Planning Of Multidisciplinary Building In Honor Of Henrietta Lacks.

Johns Hopkins Medicine

After a rigorous vetting process, Johns Hopkins University officials announced today their selection of Vines Architecture to lead the planning stages, known as a feasibility study, for a multidisciplinary building that will honor the legacy of Henrietta Lacks.

Released:
5-Oct-2019 1:15 PM EDT
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Newswise: Careful Monitoring of Children Following Cardiac Surgery May Improve Long-Term Outcomes

Article ID: 720064

Careful Monitoring of Children Following Cardiac Surgery May Improve Long-Term Outcomes

Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a medical records study covering thousands of children, a U.S.-Canadian team led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine concludes that while surgery to correct congenital heart disease (CHD) within 10 years after birth may restore young hearts to healthy function, it also may be associated with an increased risk of death and kidney failure within a few months or years after surgery.

Released:
3-Oct-2019 10:00 AM EDT
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Newswise: ‘Dietary’ Vulnerability Found in Cancer Cells With Mutated Spliceosomes

Article ID: 720026

‘Dietary’ Vulnerability Found in Cancer Cells With Mutated Spliceosomes

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A research team from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center reports it has discovered a metabolic vulnerability in multiple types of cancer cells that bear a common genetic mutation affecting cellular machines called spliceosomes. In test tube and mouse experiments, the researchers learned that the resulting spliceosome malfunction cripples the cells’ chemical process for generating the amino acid serine, making the cancer cells dependent on external (dietary) sources of the amino acid. When mice were fed a serine-restricted diet, their tumors (myeloid sarcomas, the solid tumor version of acute myeloid leukemia) shrank, suggesting that a similar dietary intervention might be helpful for patients bearing the mutation, the researchers say. Among foods high in serine are soybeans, nuts, eggs, lentils, meat and shellfish.

Released:
3-Oct-2019 9:00 AM EDT
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