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Medicine

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Generic Drug Use, Generic Drug, Ophthalmology, optometrist, Eye Care, Glaucoma, dry eye

A Switch to Generic Eye Drugs Could Save Medicare Millions

Eye care providers prescribe more brand medications by volume than any other provider group, according to a University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center study, making ophthalmologist and optometrists big influencers of annual prescription drug spending in the United States.

Medicine

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Vaccines, Vaccination, Immunization, Adolescent Health, Teen Health

Teens May Be Missing Vaccines Because Parents Aren’t Aware They Need One

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Parents may be up to speed on what vaccines their children need for kindergarten, but may be less sure during high school years, a new national poll suggests.

Medicine

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C. Difficile, Clostridia, Hospital-acquired condition, c. diff, Calcium, Intestinal Bacteria, Spores

Could Calcium Hold the Key to Fighting a Dangerous Hospital Infection?

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It lurks in hospitals and nursing homes, preying upon patients already weak from disease or advanced age. It kills nearly 30,000 Americans a year, and sickens half a million more. But new research shows that Clostridium difficile bacteria can’t do this without enough of a humble nutrient: calcium. That new knowledge may lead to better treatments.

Medicine

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Glaucoma, Minimally Invasive Surgery, minimally invasive glaucoma surgery, MIGS, Stent, glaucoma stent

Stent Surgery Reduces Risk and Recovery Time for Some Glaucoma Patients

It's the width of a human hair but a tiny device implanted at University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center can relieve eye pressure when glaucoma threatens sight.

Medicine

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Migraine, Headache, headache causes, Neurology, hairstyle, Hair Care

Neurologist Explains Why a Tight Ponytail Can Cause a Painful Headache

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There’s a medical explanation for the discomfort some people feel with their hair up. A headache specialist shares who’s at risk and how to cope.

Medicine

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Prescription Drug Cost, Senior Citizens, medication review, Adherence, Prescription Drug

Older Americans Don’t Get – or Seek – Enough Help From Doctors & Pharmacists on Drug Costs, Poll Finds

The majority of Americans over age 50 take two or more prescription medicines to prevent or treat health problems, and many of them say the cost weighs on their budget, a new poll finds. But many older adults aren’t getting – or asking for – as much help as they could from their doctors and pharmacists to find lower-cost options, the new data reveal.

Medicine

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acute conjunctivitis, pinkeye, Pediatrics, antibiotic overuse, antibiotic eye drops, eye drops, Health Policy

Why You're Probably Getting the Wrong Pink Eye Treatment

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New nationwide look by University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center suggests most people with acute conjunctivitis, or pink eye, are getting the wrong treatment. Antibiotics are often helpful for the common eye infection.

Medicine

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Cancer, Breast Cancer, support networks, Can, Decision Making

How Family and Friends Influence Breast Cancer Treatment Decisions

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When a woman walks into the oncologist’s office, she’s usually not alone. In fact, a new study finds that half of women have at least three people standing behind them, sitting next to them or waiting at home to help.

Medicine

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proteogenomics, NCI, Cancer

Grant Establishes Proteogenomics Center at U-M

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Researchers at the University of Michigan will lead one of five nationally funded centers dedicated to accelerating research into understanding the molecular basis of cancer and sharing resources with the scientific community.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Medicaid, medicaid expansion, Michigan, Presenteeism, Employment, Uninsurance, Affordable Care Act

Expanded Medicaid Helped People Do Better at Their Jobs or Seek Work, While Improving Their Health

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Most low-income Michigan residents who signed up for the state’s expanded Medicaid program say their new health insurance helped them do a better job at work, or made it easier for them to seek a new or better job, in the first year after they enrolled. That’s on top of the positive health effects that many said their new coverage brought them.







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