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Released: 28-Sep-2011 12:50 PM EDT
Carolina Researchers Tapped to Develop National Data Infrastructure
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The National Science Foundation has awarded nearly $8 million over five years to the DataNet Federation Consortium, a group that spans seven universities, to build and deploy a prototype national data management infrastructure. About half the award will support research and development at UNC.

Released: 27-Sep-2011 11:00 AM EDT
International Water Experts Gather at UNC
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

To tackle these problems, hundreds of the world’s leading water, sanitation and hygiene experts will come together Oct. 3-7 as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill hosts its annual conference, “Water and Health: Where Science Meets Policy.” The event, taking place at the William and Ida Friday Center for Continuing Education, is convened by the Water Institute at UNC and the UNC Institute for the Environment.

23-Sep-2011 9:05 AM EDT
New Study Adds Guidance on When to Start Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

For doctors and people living with HIV, deciding when to start treatment is a key decision. Some recent studies have found that starting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) earlier is better. However, a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill finds that there may be a limit to how early the therapy should start.

Released: 20-Sep-2011 9:15 AM EDT
UNC Concussion Researcher Named Macarthur Fellow
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill sports medicine researcher Kevin Guskiewicz, one of the country’s leading experts on concussions, has been named a 2011 MacArthur Fellow.

25-Jul-2011 10:30 AM EDT
Scientists Map Attack Tactics of Plant Pathogens
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Each year, plant diseases wipe out millions of tons of crops and waste valuable water resources. But a new discovery suggests that all pathogens attack plants via a surprisingly limited number of cellular targets. The finding could help researchers develop disease resistant crops and environmentally sustainable treatments for plant diseases.

Released: 13-Jul-2011 4:30 PM EDT
No Magic Bullet to Improve Diet, Stem Obesity Epidemic
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

In a report released July 11 in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, nutrition researchers from UNC’s Gillings School of Global Public Health found that having access to neighborhood grocery stores or larger supermarkets alone did not make a significant change in dietary habits. Living near fast food restaurants seemed to increase the amount of fast food consumed by lower income males, but findings were mixed across other groups, said Penny Gordon-Larsen, Ph.D., the study’s senior author.

Released: 29-Jun-2011 12:00 PM EDT
U.S. Adults Not Just Eating More, but More Often
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Over the past 30 years U.S. adults have been eating larger portions and eating more often, according to a new study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers.

Released: 27-Jun-2011 1:10 PM EDT
Most Parents Unaware of Teen Workplace Risks
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Previous findings have shown that about 80 percent of teens are employed during their high school years. But the study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Injury Prevention Research Center and North Carolina State University highlights the role parents play in helping their children get those jobs, and making good decisions about workplace safety and health.

Released: 23-Jun-2011 3:25 PM EDT
UNC Experts Contribute to New Recommendations, Tools to Combat Early Childhood Obesity
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A new national report offers policy recommendations to curb the high rates of obesity among America’s youngest children. The report, issued by the Institute of Medicine, includes guidelines such as limiting television and other media use, encouraging infants and young children in preschool and child care to spend more time in physically active play, and requiring child care providers to promote healthy sleeping practices.

Released: 16-Jun-2011 6:00 PM EDT
New Study Highlights Perils of Snack-Filled Diet
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A high-fat diet can be bad for your health. However, a snack-based “cafeteria”-style diet of highly palatable, energy-dense foods is even worse, according to new research.

Released: 23-May-2011 11:10 AM EDT
Nearly One in Five Young Adults May Have High Blood Pressure
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The number of young adults in the U.S. with high blood pressure may be much higher than previously reported. A new study analyzed data on more than 14,000 people between 24 and 32 years old. Nineteen percent had elevated blood pressure. The findings illustrate how the processes that trigger serious chronic illnesses in older adults may begin early in life.

Released: 26-Apr-2011 2:00 PM EDT
More than a Game: Symposium Takes Broad Look at Consequences of Sports Head Injuries
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Top experts from around the country will be at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill later this week to teach athletic trainers and medical providers how to prevent deaths and serious injuries among high school and college athletes.

Released: 15-Apr-2011 11:30 AM EDT
New Legal Model Proposed to Counter Red Tape, Boost Participation in DNA Sample Research
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Healthy people who contribute DNA samples for medical research see their relationship with researchers as sharing a trade secret, rather than participation in traditional medical research, according to a new study.

Released: 29-Mar-2011 12:00 PM EDT
Repellent-Treated Clothing Nearly Eliminates Tick Bites for Outdoor Workers
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A pilot study shows clothes treated with long-lasting insect repellant appear to offer outdoor workers significant protection against tick bites. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, found 93 percent fewer tick attachments among a group of state water quality employees who wore Insect Shield Repellent Apparel, compared to workers in similar environments who used spray repellants or other tick bite prevention methods.

25-Mar-2011 10:00 AM EDT
Kids with Asthma Need More Help with Inhalers
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Fewer than one in 10 children with asthma use traditional inhalers correctly, according to a new study. Researchers also found that the majority of health-care providers did not demonstrate or assess children’s use of such devices during pediatric asthma visits.

Released: 1-Mar-2011 12:55 PM EST
Preventive Dental Services by Physicians Reduce Tooth Decay Treatments in Preschoolers
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A preventive dental program targeting preschoolers under age 4 administered by physicians instead of dentists effectively reduces the need for tooth decay-related treatment among young children, a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study shows.

Released: 21-Feb-2011 12:35 PM EST
Payment, Shipping Bans Stub Out Cigarette-Selling Websites
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bans on using credit cards to pay for cigarettes bought on Internet sites – combined with bans on commercial shippers delivering the products – appear to have effectively reduced the size and reach of the online cigarette sales industry, a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study shows.

14-Feb-2011 12:55 PM EST
Corals Stressed, but Location, Location, Location Matters
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A new study has identified a troubling change in long-term coral growth patterns on the world’s second largest barrier reef. The findings suggest that corals closest to the open ocean — and furthest from traditional land-based threats — are having the most trouble coping with environmental stress, from sources such as climate change and pollutants.

Released: 27-Jan-2011 11:00 AM EST
UNC Co-Leads Study to Identify Risks for Dementia, Cognitive Decline
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers are co-leading a national study to examine whether middle-aged people’s physical health influences their risk of dementia later in life.

Released: 19-Jan-2011 2:40 PM EST
Survivors’ Stories, Statistics, Highlight Importance of Cervical Cancer Elimination Goal
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Patricia Gregory of Cary was only 24 years old when she was diagnosed with cervical cancer. Now a mother of an 11-year-old daughter, she considers herself blessed to have a child, as cervical cancer can make women unable to bear children.

Newswise: Researchers Inch Closer to Unlocking Potential of Synthetic Blood
5-Jan-2011 12:15 PM EST
Researchers Inch Closer to Unlocking Potential of Synthetic Blood
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

UNC researchers have created synthetic particles that closely mirror some of the key properties of red blood cells. The particles, which mimic the size, shape and flexibility of natural red blood cells, could potentially help pave the way for the development of synthetic blood and lead to more effective treatments for diseases such as cancer.

Released: 10-Jan-2011 1:20 PM EST
‘Manning Up’ Appears to Help, Not Hinder, African-American Male’s Health
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

“Men’s concepts of what it means to be a ‘real’ man are generally shaped by traditional masculine role norms, which encourage men to be extremely self-reliant and these norms often affect their health behavior,” said Wizdom Powell Hammond, Ph.D., assistant professor of health behavior and health education at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health and a member of UNC’s Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. “We’ve seen in other studies that men with strong commitment to traditional masculine role norms delay health care because they don’t want to seem weak.

Released: 10-Jan-2011 10:50 AM EST
Library to Note Civil War’s 150th Daily for Four Years
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

What was happening in the South 150 years ago on any given date during the Civil War? A website posting just that, every day for four years, is planned by the University Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The site will be among numerous library activities commemorating the 150th anniversary of the conflict.

Released: 4-Jan-2011 12:00 PM EST
Men’s Openness to HPV Vaccine Could Bolster Impact of New FDA Decision, Reduce Cancer Deaths
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Men are more willing to receive human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine when they learn the vaccine can prevent cancer, according to a recent University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study.

Released: 15-Dec-2010 3:00 PM EST
Holiday Tips: Planning, Flexibility Can Ease Stress for Stepfamilies
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

December is supposed to usher in “the most wonderful time of the year,” but for many families, the holiday season often heaps on a sizeable helping of stress and frustration.

Released: 22-Nov-2010 12:00 PM EST
Worth a Thousand Million Words: Researchers Create 3-D Models from Online Photo Databases
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Computer scientists have invented a technique that automatically creates 3-D models of landmarks and geographical locations, using ordinary two-dimensional pictures available through Internet photo sharing sites like Flickr.

Released: 11-Nov-2010 12:45 PM EST
Brass Devices in Plumbing Systems Can Create Serious Lead-In-Water Problems
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A new research study highlights problems with some brass products in plumbing systems that can leach very high levels of lead into drinking water, even in brand new buildings – and suggests that such problems may often go undetected.

Released: 10-Nov-2010 4:55 PM EST
UNC Miscarriage Expert Available to Comment on Bush’s Miscarriage Disclosure
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Miscarriage expert Kristen M. Swanson is available for interviews about President George W. Bush’s disclosure of his mother’s miscarriage in his book ‘Decision Points.’ Swanson has 25 years of research experience focused on helping couples resolve grief and depression after pregnancy loss.

8-Nov-2010 1:30 PM EST
Obese Adolescents at Greatest Risk of Becoming Severely Obese Adults
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Obese adolescents are 16 times more likely to become severely obese by age 30 than their healthy weight or even overweight peers, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

3-Nov-2010 2:00 PM EDT
Discovery Blocks Cancer Drug’s Toxic Side Effect
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A debilitating side effect of a colon cancer chemotherapy treatment could be eliminated if a new discovery bears fruit. The pre-clinical finding relates to the drug CPT-11, or Irinotecan, which can cause severe diarrhea. Researchers targeted and blocked an enzyme in bacteria in the digestive system believed to be responsible for the side effect.

Released: 20-Oct-2010 10:25 AM EDT
Tackling Youth Violence: US’s First Rural Prevention Center Created in NC County
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

North Carolina will be home to the nation’s first rurally focused youth violence prevention center, with a federal grant worth nearly $6.5 million to support a new project based in Robeson County and led by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers.

Released: 24-Sep-2010 9:40 AM EDT
Mathematicians Network to Tackle Climate Change Issues
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The Mathematics and Climate Change Network is led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with the UNC Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI) providing logistical support and cyber tools to support the creation of a virtual organization spanning the United States. The foundation is providing $1 million annually for five years to support the project.

Released: 16-Sep-2010 2:15 PM EDT
UNC, Children’s Hospital Boston Develop iPhone App to Report, Receive Drug Safety News
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Children’s Hospital Boston have developed a new iPhone application to encourage health-care professionals and patients to send and receive information about the use and side effects of prescription medications.

Released: 15-Sep-2010 3:00 PM EDT
Landmark Children’s Health Study Launches in Durham County
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Residents of Durham County, N.C., are encouraged to take part in the largest ever long-term study of children’s health and development undertaken in the United States.

Released: 31-Aug-2010 4:00 PM EDT
UNC’s Hurricane Experts Track, Respond to and Study Major Storms
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

With Hurricane Earl on a path to brush the North Carolina coast and as the hurricane season reaches its traditional peak, experts at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill can help members of the media who need knowledgeable commentary on topics ranging from the current storm outlook to emergency response efforts. UNC researchers often are on the frontlines of such efforts when storms strike, and the University is a major center of hurricane-related research.

Released: 27-Jul-2010 1:30 PM EDT
Humble Protein, Nanoparticles Tag-Team to Kill Cancer Cells
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A normally benign protein found in the human body appears to be able – when paired with nanoparticles – to zero in on and kill certain cancer cells, without having to also load those particles with chemotherapy drugs. The finding could lead to a new strategy for targeted cancer therapies, according to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill scientists who made the discovery.

Released: 23-Jun-2010 12:20 PM EDT
Poll: Growing Support in North Carolina to Increase State’s Tobacco Tax
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Raising taxes typically is not a popular idea, but the option of increasing cigarette sales tax has been gaining momentum in North Carolina for the past several years. Statewide polls since 2004 have shown a majority of North Carolinians support increasing the sales tax on cigarettes as a means of generating state revenue, especially when the funds are used to support public health programs and to decrease teen smoking rates.

Released: 21-Jun-2010 12:00 PM EDT
UNC, NC State, SAS to Develop System to Quickly Detect, Warn of Bioterrorism Signals
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

North Carolina will be the national model for a new system to detect the earliest signs of an impending bioterrorism attack and provide warnings in time to minimize damage to human and animal life as well as the environment.

Released: 3-Jun-2010 4:35 PM EDT
Tip Sheet: UNC Researchers Help Tackle Gulf Oil Spill
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Researchers from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are involved in frontline efforts to deal with the disastrous Gulf oil spill. Topics include projecting its spread; research that may help lessen its impact; the disaster’s legal ramifications; and first-hand accounts from the Gulf.

10-May-2010 3:20 PM EDT
Untangling Facebook, Decoding Congress: New Mathematical Method May Help Tame Big Data
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Networks permeate modern life, from Facebook to political allegiances. Now University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill mathematicians and colleagues have developed a new technique for examining networks to help identify patterns and see how connections evolve.

28-Apr-2010 9:00 AM EDT
Biodiversity Protection Efforts Earn Failing Grade
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Disappearing coral reefs are among a host of ecological markers that showcase how promises to protect the planet’s biodiversity are not being met, according to a study this week in the journal Science. The findings are an assessment of targets made at the 2002 Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). UNC marine scientist John Bruno is a study co-author.

Released: 28-Apr-2010 1:15 PM EDT
Preventing HPV Might Lower Risk of HIV Infection in Men
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Men infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) are at greater risk of becoming infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) than men who are not HPV positive, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Released: 30-Mar-2010 9:00 AM EDT
Too Much Weight May Delay Infants’ Ability to Crawl, Walk
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Those cute little rolls of fat some infants have may actually slow their ability to crawl and walk, according to a new study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The study, published recently online in The Journal of Pediatrics, shows that infants who are overweight may be slower than thinner babies to develop motor skills.

Released: 29-Mar-2010 11:00 AM EDT
Few Women Get Enough Exercise During Pregnancy
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Fewer than 1 in 4 pregnant women meet physical activity guidelines set by doctors and health officials, according to a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study.

Released: 15-Mar-2010 3:00 PM EDT
Obesity Impairs Body’s “Memory” of How to Fight Flu
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

– Obesity may limit the body’s ability to develop immunity to influenza viruses, particularly secondary infections, by inhibiting the immune system’s ability to “remember” how it fought off previous similar bouts of illness, according to new research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Released: 8-Mar-2010 4:35 PM EST
Improvements Needed in Genomic Test Result Discussions
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

One in three early stage breast cancer patients who received genomic testing when deciding about treatment options felt they did not fully understand their discussions with physicians about their test results and their risk of the disease recurring, a new study has found.

4-Mar-2010 5:15 PM EST
Higher Fast Food Prices Lead to Lower Weight, Diabetes Risk
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A new study shows both weight and diabetes risk fell for people in communities where fast food prices increased. “This study gives us strong scientific evidence that price policies, including taxes, could actually be effective at helping control obesity and the resulting chronic diseases, like diabetes,” researchers said.

25-Feb-2010 10:45 PM EST
Study Identifies Risks, Benefits of Anemia Drugs
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Aggressive treatment of anemia with intravenous iron and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) may lower the risk of death for dialysis patients with severe anemia – but also may increase the risk of death among patients with milder anemia, a new study in JAMA suggests.

Released: 2-Mar-2010 1:30 PM EST
U.S. Children Snacking More; Junk Calories Leading the Rise
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Children in the United States are snacking more than ever before on salty chips, candy and other junk food, according to a new University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study.

15-Feb-2010 9:00 AM EST
Coral Loss Slowed, Reversed by Marine Protected Areas
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

A new worldwide study shows marine protected areas (MPAs), underwater parks where fishing and other potentially harmful activities are regulated, provide an added bonus – helping coral reef ecosystems ward off and recover from threats to their health. Researchers also found the protective effects of MPAs generally strengthen over time.


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