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Article ID: 701105

Researchers Explore How Being Male or Female Affects Our Hearts, Kidneys and Waistlines

American Physiological Society (APS)

A person’s biological sex can be a defining factor in how well—or how poorly—they respond to disease, therapy and recovery. Experts at the forefront of sex-specific research will convene next week at the sixth APS conference on sex differences in cardiovascular and renal physiology. The Cardiovascular, Renal and Metabolic Diseases: Sex-Specific Implications for Physiology conference will be held September 30–October 3 in Knoxville, Tenn.

Released:
26-Sep-2018 7:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701035

Why That Daily Coffee May Help When You Hurt

University of Alabama at Birmingham

The last thing anyone wants to hear, as National Coffee Day approaches Sept. 29 and stores offer celebratory discounts, is something negative about America’s favorite brew.

Released:
26-Sep-2018 5:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Sep-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 701102

Sunflower Pollen Has Medicinal, Protective Effects on Bees

North Carolina State University

Sunflower pollen lowers pathogen infection rates and contributes to healthier bumble bee and honey bee colonies.

Released:
25-Sep-2018 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 701045

Making old antibiotics new again

University of Colorado Boulder

CU Boulder researchers have identified a family of small molecules that turn off defense mechanisms inside bacteria that enable them to resist antibiotics. The compounds could ultimately be given alongside existing medications to rejuvenate them.

Released:
26-Sep-2018 3:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Sep-2018 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 700998

Researchers identify marker in brain associated with aggression in children

University of Iowa

A University of Iowa-led research team has identified a brain-wave marker associated with aggression in young children. The finding could lead to earlier identification of toddlers with aggressive tendencies before the behavior becomes more ingrained in adolescence. Results published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Released:
24-Sep-2018 12:15 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Embargo will expire:
1-Oct-2018 12:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
26-Sep-2018 12:00 AM EDT

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Article ID: 701118

Being Older Helps Skin Heal with Less Scarring, and Now Researchers Know Why

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A compound secreted in the bloodstream could be the key factor that causes wounds in older people to heal with less scarring than in younger people.

Released:
25-Sep-2018 11:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 701121

Common heart condition linked to sudden death

University of Adelaide

A University of Adelaide-led team of researchers has found a link between sudden cardiac death (when the heart suddenly stops beating) and a common heart condition known as mitral valve prolapse that affects around 12 in every 1000 people worldwide.

Released:
25-Sep-2018 10:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 701048

National Chiropractic Health Month Starts on Oct. 1: Get Moving!

American Chiropractic Association

The American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and chiropractors nationwide are promoting the benefits of movement to overall health as well as the prevention of back pain during National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM) in October.

Released:
25-Sep-2018 9:05 PM EDT

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