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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 30-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 25-Sep-2020 7:05 PM EDT

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 30-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 25-Sep-2020 7:05 PM EDT

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Newswise: Last-resort life support option helped majority of critically ill COVID-19 patients survive, global study shows
24-Sep-2020 3:20 PM EDT
Last-resort life support option helped majority of critically ill COVID-19 patients survive, global study shows
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

It saved lives in past epidemics of lung-damaging viruses. Now, the life-support option known as ECMO appears to be doing the same for many of the critically ill COVID-19 patients who receive it. Patients in a new international study faced a staggeringly high risk of death, as ventilators failed to support their lungs. But after they were placed on ECMO, their actual death rate was less than 40%.

Newswise:Video Embedded could-a-tiny-fish-hold-the-key-to-curing-blindness
VIDEO
Released: 25-Sep-2020 6:05 PM EDT
Could a tiny fish hold the key to curing blindness?
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Imagine this: A patient learns that they are losing their sight because an eye disease has damaged crucial cells in their retina. Then, under the care of their doctor, they simply grow some new retinal cells, restoring their vision. Although science hasn’t yet delivered this happy ending, researchers are working on it – with help from the humble zebrafish. When a zebrafish loses its retinal cells, it grows new ones. This observation has encouraged scientists to try hacking the zebrafish’s innate regenerative capacity to learn how to treat human disease. That is why among the National Eye Institute’s 1,200 active research projects, nearly 80 incorporate zebrafish.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Case Western Reserve University researchers to examine how COVID-19 ravaged America’s nursing homes
Case Western Reserve University

Within a few months, federal officials reported that one of every five nursing homes had experienced a death from the novel coronavirus. Not long after, several media outlets published independent analysis finding that an estimated 40% of the fatalities related to COVID-19 took place in nursing homes. Rather than surrender to the terrifying trend, Case Western Reserve researchers saw an opportunity to help.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Interdisciplinary team wins grant to speed oral cancer testing
Case Western Reserve University

Mouth lesions are among the main early indicators of oral cancer, but determining whether a sore is actually malignant typically involves painful, costly biopsies. Case Western Reserve researchers think they have a better idea—and the National Institutes of Health has given them $420,000 to advance it.

Newswise: Plants without cellular recycling systems get creative in the dark
Released: 25-Sep-2020 4:20 PM EDT
Plants without cellular recycling systems get creative in the dark
Washington University in St. Louis

Deprived of sunlight, plants are unable to transform carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into sugars. They are essentially starved of one of their most important building blocks. New research with maize shows that plants that lack the core components for autophagy have to get creative about recycling nutrients like carbon when they’re left in the dark.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 4:15 PM EDT
Faced with pandemic shortages, researchers combine heat and humidity to disinfect N95 masks for reuse
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

They found that gently heating N95 masks in high relative humidity could inactivate SARS-CoV-2 virus trapped within the masks, without degrading the masks’ performance.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 3:55 PM EDT
ASA Applauds White House Effort to End Surprise Medical Bills
American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA)

The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) applauds yesterday’s announcement of an Executive Order by the president to address surprise medical bills. ASA has been committed to ongoing efforts to protect patients while finding a fair solution to addressing these unexpected medical bills.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Amherst, Wesleyan Presidents Lead Group of Higher Ed Leaders in Urging Dept of Ed to End Investigation of Princeton
Amherst College

More than 80 college and university leaders have signed onto a statement co-authored by Presidents Biddy Martin of Amherst College and Michael S. Roth of Wesleyan University urging the U.S. Department of Education (DOE) to abandon its announced civil rights investigation into Princeton University.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 28-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 25-Sep-2020 3:35 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 3:30 PM EDT
Team assessing if dual-antibody injection prevents COVID-19 illness
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A combination antibody treatment for preventing COVID-19 illness in individuals who have had sustained exposure to someone with the virus is being studied by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The clinical trial is enrolling patients at Harris Health System’s Lyndon B. Johnson Hospital.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 3:20 PM EDT
News Release: DHS S&T Seeks First Responder Technology for Demonstration
Homeland Security's Science And Technology Directorate

S&T's OpEx Program releases request for information with four technical topic areas to identify interest for participation in demonstration activity for state and local first responders.

Newswise: Tandon Researchers develop method to create colloidal diamonds
Released: 25-Sep-2020 3:00 PM EDT
Tandon Researchers develop method to create colloidal diamonds
New York University

Researchers led by David Pine of the NYU Tandon School of Engineering devised a new process for the reliable self-assembly of colloids in a diamond formation that could lead to cheap, scalable fabrication of such structures.

Newswise: 2020 Tom Isaacs Award honors leading Parkinson’s expert
Released: 25-Sep-2020 2:45 PM EDT
2020 Tom Isaacs Award honors leading Parkinson’s expert
Van Andel Institute

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (Sept. 25, 2020) — Van Andel Institute and The Cure Parkinson’s Trust are thrilled to announce Caroline Tanner, M.D., Ph.D., of University of California, San Francisco’s Weill Institute for Neurosciences as the recipient of the 2020 Tom Isaacs Award, which honors individuals who have had a significant impact on the lives of people with Parkinson’s and/or involved them in a participatory way in research.

Newswise: Stem cells can repair Parkinson’s-damaged circuits in mouse brains
Released: 25-Sep-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Stem cells can repair Parkinson’s-damaged circuits in mouse brains
University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin–Madison researchers demonstrated a proof-of-concept stem cell treatment in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. They found that neurons derived from stem cells can integrate well into the correct regions of the brain, connect with native neurons and restore motor functions.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Yes, Wisconsin Republicans have the power to overturn the extended mask mandate order by Governor Evers
Newswise

Republicans have the legal power to reverse the order by Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers that extends the mask mandate.

Newswise: Coldest Northern Hemisphere temperature, first recorded by UW–Madison, officially confirmed
Released: 25-Sep-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Coldest Northern Hemisphere temperature, first recorded by UW–Madison, officially confirmed
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Nearly 30 years after recording a temperature of minus 93.2 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 69.6 Celsius) in Greenland, the measurement has been verified by the World Meteorological Organization as the coldest recorded temperature in the Northern Hemisphere. The measurement was first recorded by a University of Wisconsin–Madison Antarctic Meteorological Research Center Automatic Weather Station in December 1991.

Newswise: RufinaAlamo_WEB.jpg
Released: 25-Sep-2020 2:05 PM EDT
FSU researchers help develop sustainable polymers
Florida State University

Researchers at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering have made new discoveries on the effects of temperature on sustainable polymers. Their findings may help the industry to produce plastics that are better for the environment.

Newswise:Video Embedded material-scientists-learn-how-to-make-liquid-crystal-shape-shift
VIDEO
23-Sep-2020 7:00 AM EDT
Material scientists learn how to make liquid crystal shape-shift
University of California San Diego

A new 3D-printing method will make it easier to manufacture and control the shape of soft robots, artificial muscles and wearable devices. By controlling the printing temperature of liquid crystal elastomer, researchers have shown they can control the material’s stiffness and ability to contract.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 1:55 PM EDT
How do Americans view the virus? Anthropology professor examines attitudes of COVID
Northern Arizona University

In her ongoing research about Americans' responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, Northern Arizona University anthropology professor Lisa Hardy and her collaborators have talked to dozens of people.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 1:35 PM EDT
The male Y chromosome does more than we thought
University of Montreal

New light is being shed on a little-known role of Y chromosome genes, specific to males, that could explain why men suffer differently than women from various diseases, including Covid-19.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 12:55 PM EDT
During pandemic, racism puts additional stress on Asian Americans
Massachusetts General Hospital

Many people are feeling anxious during these uncertain times as they navigate the risks associated with COVID-19 and experience the tension from physical distancing or isolation for what can seem like an eternity.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 12:55 PM EDT
COVID-19 shapes political approval ratings
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Approval ratings of political leaders surged in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Newswise: The American Nuclear Society designates the groundbreaking Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor a Nuclear Historic Landmark
Released: 25-Sep-2020 12:40 PM EDT
The American Nuclear Society designates the groundbreaking Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor a Nuclear Historic Landmark
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

The record-setting PPPL tokamak that laid the foundation for future fusion power plants receives the distinguished landmark designation from the the American Nuclear Society.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 12:40 PM EDT
ASU Researchers Receive $6m State Contract to Develop Rapid, 20-Minute Covid-19 Saliva Test
Arizona State University (ASU)

As the world manages through the coronavirus pandemic, Arizona State University continues its work to discover and develop easier and more widespread COVID-19 testing to assist in managing the virus.

Newswise: 244069_web.jpg
Released: 25-Sep-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Remnants of an ancient asteroid shed new light on the early solar system
Hiroshima University

Researchers have shaken up a once accepted timeline for cataclysmic events in the early solar system.

Newswise: Northern Illinois flourishes as accelerator R&D hub under Fermilab leadership
Released: 25-Sep-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Northern Illinois flourishes as accelerator R&D hub under Fermilab leadership
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)

Fermilab and partners in northern Illinois have established the region as a leader in particle accelerator science and technology. Few places in the world boast such concentrated effort in particle acceleration research, developing and building cutting-edge particle accelerators, and growing an accelerator-focused workforce.

Newswise: NYU College of Dentistry Awarded NIH Grant to Investigate Endosomal Receptors as Targets for Chronic Pain Treatment
Released: 25-Sep-2020 12:05 PM EDT
NYU College of Dentistry Awarded NIH Grant to Investigate Endosomal Receptors as Targets for Chronic Pain Treatment
New York University

The NIH has awarded NYU College of Dentistry researchers Nigel Bunnett, PhD, and Brian Schmidt, DDS, MD, PhD, a $3.9 million grant to study targeting endosomal receptors for the treatment of chronic pain. The five-year grant will support Bunnett and Schmidt’s collaborative research, which aims to ultimately yield improved pain management without the need for opioids.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Scholars untangle marketing's complex role in understanding political activities
American Marketing Association (AMA)

As 2020 began, many pundits predicted a politically charged year, but few predicted that it would include a global pandemic overtaxing healthcare resources, strained U.S. race relations resulting in mass demonstrations across the globe, devastating fires consuming massive swaths of the United States, and a catastrophic global economic downturn.

Newswise: 244080_web.jpg
Released: 25-Sep-2020 11:35 AM EDT
Potential drug target for dangerous E. coli infections identified
University of New South Wales

Escherichia coli, known as E. coli, are bacteria which many people associate with causing mild food poisoning, but some types of E. coli can be fatal.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 11:20 AM EDT
Tattoos Impair Sweating, Could Increase Risk of Heat-related Injury
American Physiological Society (APS)

New research finds that tattooed skin does not sweat as much as non-inked areas of the body, which may have implications for the body’s ability to cool in people with extensive tattooing.

Newswise: 244081_web.jpg
Released: 25-Sep-2020 11:15 AM EDT
New funerary and ritual behaviors of the Neolithic Iberian populations discovered
University of Seville

Experts from the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology of the University of Seville have just published a study in the prestigious journal PLOS ONE on an important archaeological find in the Cueva de la Dehesilla (Cádiz).

Released: 25-Sep-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Study delivers new knowledge about what causes thunderstorms and cloud bursts
University of Copenhagen

Thunderstorms are weather disturbances characterized by concentrations of thunder, lightning and fierce winds.

Newswise: 244091_web.jpg
Released: 25-Sep-2020 10:50 AM EDT
Marine heatwaves are human made
University of Bern

A marine heatwave (ocean heatwave) is an extended period of time in which the water temperature in a particular ocean region is abnormally high.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 10:50 AM EDT
COVID-19 Spurs Anxious, Upsetting Dreams
American Psychological Association (APA)

The anxiety, stress and worry brought on by COVID-19 is not limited to daytime hours. The pandemic is affecting our dreams as well, infusing more anxiety and negative emotions into dreams and spurring dreams about the virus itself, particularly among women, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Appoints Janice Bowie as New Bloomberg Centennial Professor
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has appointed Janice Bowie, PhD, MPH, as a Bloomberg Centennial Professor.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Risk Communication Expert Offers Public Health Guide to COVID-19 Retweets
University at Albany, State University of New York

Researchers analyzed 150,000 tweets about COVID-19 from about 700 state and local agencies between February and April 2020 to see what factors led to the most retweets.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Superfluid shows more surprising phenomena
Cornell University

The superfluid helium-3 has many notable qualities. With its low mass and small atomic size, it remains in a liquid state – and when it transforms to the superfluid state, flowing without resistance – down to absolute zero, or minus 459.67 degrees Fahrenheit. It is a pure system, without any disorder. And it is full of surprises.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 30-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 25-Sep-2020 10:05 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Scientists Train Computers to Recognize Which Early Stage Breast Cancers Will Spread
Released: 25-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Scientists Train Computers to Recognize Which Early Stage Breast Cancers Will Spread
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new, machine-learning based approach could help doctors to separate aggressive stage 0 breast cancer from non-aggressive forms, sparing some women unnecessary mastectomies.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 30-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 25-Sep-2020 10:00 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Sep-2020 8:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Scott, Warner introduce legislation to increase access for diabetes care
Endocrine Society

Today, U.S. Senators Tim Scott (R-SC), Mark Warner (D-VA), Kevin Cramer (R-ND), Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ), Tom Cotton (R-AR), and Tina Smith (D-MN) introduced the PREVENT DIABETES Act. This legislation would increase access to the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) Expanded Model by allowing CDC-recognized virtual suppliers to participate in the program.

Newswise: World Lung Day 2020: Respiratory Groups Call for Research to Prevent, Detect and Treat Respiratory Infections
Released: 25-Sep-2020 9:45 AM EDT
World Lung Day 2020: Respiratory Groups Call for Research to Prevent, Detect and Treat Respiratory Infections
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Today, on World Lung Day (WLD), the American Thoracic Society is united with members of the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) and WLD partner organizations to advocate for respiratory health globally and call for more research to prevent, detect and treat respiratory infections.

Newswise: Understanding Sickle Cell Disease
Released: 25-Sep-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Understanding Sickle Cell Disease
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Sickle cell disease is a lifelong inherited disorder of the red blood cells that poses many challenges for the people and families living with it. Rutgers Cancer Institute expert shares more on the basics of sickle cell disease and how the illness is managed.

Released: 25-Sep-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Disability Vote Grows to 38.3 Million, a 19.8% Jump Since 2008
Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR)

A projected 38.3 million people with disabilities will be eligible to vote in the November 2020 elections, representing 16.3% of the electorate. This exceeds the number of eligible voters who are Black (29.9 million) or Hispanic/Latino (31.3 million).


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