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Article ID: 700436

Poorest Americans Most Likely to Have Used Prescription Opioids — and Most Users View Opioids Positively

University at Buffalo

Among older Americans, the poorest are the most likely to have used prescription opioids, according to a University at Buffalo study providing new insights into unexplored contours of the opioid crisis. The study also raises important questions about access to pain management options for the disadvantaged in the current climate of the opioid epidemic.

Released:
12-Sep-2018 3:30 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

LaMonteMichael.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    5-Sep-2018 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 699794

Study: Walk More to Reduce Heart Failure Risk

University at Buffalo

In addition to reducing overall heart failure by 25 percent, increased physical activity benefited two heart failure subtypes defined by cardiac function: reduced ejection fraction, which typically has a worse prognosis, and preserved ejection fraction, which is more common in older adults, especially women and racial-ethnic minorities.

Released:
30-Aug-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 699933

UB Expert’s Election Forecasting Model Predicts Big House Gains for Dems

University at Buffalo

A distinguished professor of political science at the University at Buffalo has published his latest Seats-in-Trouble projection in the journal PS: Political Science and Politics. James Campbell says indications point to as many as 44 seats moving to the Democrats in the upcoming midterm elections, shifting control of the House in their favor.

Released:
4-Sep-2018 12:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Jo_Freudenheim_University_at_Buffalo.jpg

Article ID: 699844

Presence of New or Worsened Bedsores Tied to Poorer Outcomes for Patients in Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities

University at Buffalo

A new study from the University at Buffalo has shown that the presence of new or worsened bedsores is an effective indicator of the quality of care for rehab patients. The study is the first to examine whether this metric is, in fact, is associated with outcome of care in inpatient rehabilitation settings.

Released:
30-Aug-2018 3:35 PM EDT

Article ID: 699750

Trump Supporters on U.S. Campuses More Likely to Show Prejudice Toward International Students

University at Buffalo

A new study by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that stereotypes alone do not lead to that prejudice against international students. The prejudice is multifaceted, but there are factors leading to prejudice that universities can influence. Results suggest aside from stereotypes, other factors, including support for President Donald Trump, predicted prejudice against international students from the domestic student population.

Released:
29-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT

Law and Public Policy

Article ID: 699716

Celebrity Culture Likely Contributed to Destigmatizing Out-of-Wedlock Childbirth

University at Buffalo

In 1992, former Vice President Dan Quayle criticized the sitcom character Murphy Brown's decision to have a child out of wedlock. That ignited discussions that continue today about whether celebrities might be contributing to the demise of the nuclear family, yet 40 years of data from one reputable celebrity news source suggests that celebrities in fact have fewer out-of-wedlock childbirths compared to the rest of the U.S. population.

Released:
29-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 699313

Vulnerable Youth Stress the Importance of Influential Adults in Their School Lives

University at Buffalo

Kids who faced daunting barriers to success in the classroom had a clear message for University at Buffalo researchers who asked them as young adults to look back on their experiences with maltreatment, homelessness and their time in school: Adults can do better. “It’s as though they’re asking us as adults not to give up on them, to stick with them,” says Annette Semanchin Jones, an assistant professor in UB’s School of Social Work.

Released:
21-Aug-2018 3:50 PM EDT

Education

Article ID: 698726

Exercise Can Help Beat Cocaine Addiction, Study Finds

University at Buffalo

Exercise can help prevent relapses into cocaine addiction, according to new research led by the University at Buffalo’s Panayotis (Peter) Thanos, PhD.

Released:
8-Aug-2018 2:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 698663

Adolescent Abortion-Fund Patients Face More Barriers Than Adults

University at Buffalo

Adolescents who received funding to help pay for an abortion experienced greater hardships that affected abortion access compared to adult abortion-fund patients, according to the results of a new study by a University at Buffalo social work researcher.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 1:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Jessica-Kruger.jpg

Article ID: 698644

Got the ‘Drunchies’? New Study Shows How Heavy Drinking Affects Diet

University at Buffalo

With obesity continuing to rise in America, researchers decided to look at a sample of college students to better understand how drinking affects what they eat, both that night and for their first meal the next day.

Released:
7-Aug-2018 10:05 AM EDT

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