Latest News from: Biophysical Society

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Released: 4-Mar-2020 10:40 AM EST
Biophysical Society Statement on COVID-19
Biophysical Society

.ROCKVILLE, MD – As concern continues to grow concerning the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, so does the opportunity for misinformation to spread as the public searches for reliable information on infection and means of protection.

Newswise: Cancer Immunotherapy Target Helps Fight Solid Tumors
12-Feb-2020 12:20 PM EST
Cancer Immunotherapy Target Helps Fight Solid Tumors
Biophysical Society

Yvonne Chen engineers immune cells to target their most evasive enemy: cancer. New cancer immunotherapies generate immune cells that are effective killers of blood cancers, but they have a hard time with solid tumors.

Newswise: Technique Can Label Many Specific DNAs, RNAs, or Proteins in a Single Tissue Sample
12-Feb-2020 12:25 PM EST
Technique Can Label Many Specific DNAs, RNAs, or Proteins in a Single Tissue Sample
Biophysical Society

A new technique can label diverse molecules and amplify the signal to help researchers spot those that are especially rare. Called SABER (signal amplification by exchange reaction), Peng Yin’s lab at Harvard’s Wyss Institute first introduced this method last year and since have found ways to apply it to proteins, DNA and RNA.

Newswise: Researchers Show How Ebola Virus Hijacks Host Lipids
12-Feb-2020 12:30 PM EST
Researchers Show How Ebola Virus Hijacks Host Lipids
Biophysical Society

Robert Stahelin studies some of the world’s deadliest viruses. Filoviruses, including Ebola virus and Marburg virus, cause viral hemorrhagic fever with high fatality rates. Stahelin, professor at Purdue University, examines how these viruses take advantage of human host cells.

Newswise: Insects’ Ability to Smell is Phenomenally Diverse, a New Protein Structure Hints at How
12-Feb-2020 12:50 PM EST
Insects’ Ability to Smell is Phenomenally Diverse, a New Protein Structure Hints at How
Biophysical Society

Mosquitoes find us by our odor molecules binding to odor receptors on their antennae, bees are drawn to flowers the same way, whereas ticks detect an approaching host using receptors on their forelegs.

Newswise: Like a Microscopic Mars Rover, a New Technique Tracks Individual Protein Movement on Live Cells
12-Feb-2020 12:55 PM EST
Like a Microscopic Mars Rover, a New Technique Tracks Individual Protein Movement on Live Cells
Biophysical Society

The piece of gold that Richard Taylor was thrilled to track down weighed less than a single bacterium. Taylor, a postdoctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute, was working to follow individual nanogold-labeled molecules that move just nanometers, billionths of a meter.

Newswise: Parkinson’s Disease Protein Structure Solved Inside Cells Using Novel Technique
12-Feb-2020 12:55 PM EST
Parkinson’s Disease Protein Structure Solved Inside Cells Using Novel Technique
Biophysical Society

The top contributor to familial Parkinson’s disease is mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), whose large and difficult structure has finally been solved, paving the way for targeted therapies.

Newswise: A New Way to Monitor Cancer Radiation Therapy Doses
12-Feb-2020 1:05 PM EST
A New Way to Monitor Cancer Radiation Therapy Doses
Biophysical Society

More than half of all cancer patients undergo radiation therapy and the dose is critical. Too much and the surrounding tissue gets damaged, too little and the cancer cells survive.

Newswise: What Induces Sleep? For Fruit Flies It’s Stress at the Cellular Level
12-Feb-2020 1:05 PM EST
What Induces Sleep? For Fruit Flies It’s Stress at the Cellular Level
Biophysical Society

Sleep-deprived fruit flies helped reveal what induces sleep. University of Oxford researchers Anissa Kempf, Gero Miesenböck, and colleagues reveal that fruit fly sleep is driven by oxidative stress, the imbalance of free radicals and antioxidants in the body.

Newswise: New High-Throughput Method to Study Gene Splicing at an Unprecedented Scale Reveals New Details About the Process
12-Feb-2020 1:15 PM EST
New High-Throughput Method to Study Gene Splicing at an Unprecedented Scale Reveals New Details About the Process
Biophysical Society

Genes are like instructions, but with options for building more than one thing. Daniel Larson, senior investigator at the National Cancer Institute, studies this gene “splicing” process, which happens in normal cells and goes awry in blood cancers like leukemia.

Newswise: Scientists Develop Molecular “Fishing” to Find Individual Molecules in Blood
12-Feb-2020 1:20 PM EST
Scientists Develop Molecular “Fishing” to Find Individual Molecules in Blood
Biophysical Society

Like finding a needle in a haystack, Liviu Movileanu can find a single molecule in blood.

Released: 1-Aug-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Biophysicists Join Effort to Eliminate Sexual Harassment in STEMM
Biophysical Society

The Biophysical Society (BPS) is proud to add its name and support to the Societies Consortium on Sexual Harassment in STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine) to measurably advance professional and ethical conduct, climate and culture across their respective fields.

Newswise: The Biophysical Society and Rep. Bill Foster Host Dr. Jennifer Doudna for CRISPR-101 Congressional Briefing
Released: 13-Mar-2019 3:05 PM EDT
The Biophysical Society and Rep. Bill Foster Host Dr. Jennifer Doudna for CRISPR-101 Congressional Briefing
Biophysical Society

On March 13 the Biophysical Society (BPS) and Congressman Bill Foster (D-IL-11) hosted Dr. Jennifer Doudna for a CRISPR-101 Congressional Briefing. The briefing received interest from more than 60 Congressional offices. The briefing took place from 10:30 to 11:30am in the Rayburn House Office Building’s Gold Room.

Newswise: When it comes to sex and aggression in mice, a cold-sensor tells the brain when “enough is enough!”
28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
When it comes to sex and aggression in mice, a cold-sensor tells the brain when “enough is enough!”
Biophysical Society

Researchers at the University of Illinois College of Medicine find that TRPM8, long ago identified as a cold-temperature sensor, regulates aggressive and hypersexual behavior in response to testosterone

Newswise: Python hearts reveal mechanisms relevant to human heart health and disease
28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
Python hearts reveal mechanisms relevant to human heart health and disease
Biophysical Society

Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder study fast-growing python hearts, which could provide insights to aid those with diseased heart growth. Their latest work reveals ways to study python heart cells.

Newswise: Ducks offer researchers a unique opportunity to study human touch
28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
Ducks offer researchers a unique opportunity to study human touch
Biophysical Society

Researchers at Yale University gain insights into the mechanics of touch by studying the sensitive skin on ducks’ bills, which they found is similar in some ways to the skin on human palms.

Newswise: New area of research: How protein structures change due to normal forces
28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
New area of research: How protein structures change due to normal forces
Biophysical Society

Researchers at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory are developing techniques to study how proteins respond to the tiny forces our cells experience.

Newswise: High fat diet causes thickening of arteries down to the cellular level
28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
High fat diet causes thickening of arteries down to the cellular level
Biophysical Society

Researchers at the University of Illinois show that the membranes of cells surrounding arteries get stiffer and thicker in response to a high fat diet, due to both LDLs and oxidized LDLs

Newswise: A highly sensitive new blood test can detect rare cancer proteins
28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
A highly sensitive new blood test can detect rare cancer proteins
Biophysical Society

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University developed a new blood test that can identify proteins-of-interest down to the sub-femtomolar range with minimal errors

Newswise: New device mimics beating heart with tiny pieces of heart tissue
28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
New device mimics beating heart with tiny pieces of heart tissue
Biophysical Society

Researchers at Imperial College London created a bioreactor to allow heart tissue to experience mechanical forces in sync with the beats, like it would in the body, to study the mechanics of healthy and diseased hearts.

Newswise: Researchers develop techniques to track the activity of a potent cancer gene in individual cells
28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
Researchers develop techniques to track the activity of a potent cancer gene in individual cells
Biophysical Society

Researchers at the National Cancer Institute use novel tools to reveal that cancer gene MYC causes global changes in gene activation, with subtle differences between individual cells

Newswise: An inner ear protein speaks volumes about how sound is converted to a brain signal
Released: 28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
An inner ear protein speaks volumes about how sound is converted to a brain signal
Biophysical Society

Researchers at Rockefeller University characterized a molecular spring attached to the membrane of inner ear cells that converts bending forces created by a sound wave to electrical signals that the brain can interpret.

Newswise: Scientists Discover How Surfaces May Have Helped Early Life on Earth Begin
Released: 28-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
Scientists Discover How Surfaces May Have Helped Early Life on Earth Begin
Biophysical Society

Researchers at the University of Oslo find that when lipids land on a surface they form tiny cell-like containers without external input, and that large organic molecules similar in size to DNA’s building blocks can spontaneously enter these protocells while they grow. Both of these are crucial steps towards forming a functioning cell.

Newswise: 63rd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting to Kick-off in Baltimore from March 2 – 6
Released: 21-Feb-2019 10:05 AM EST
63rd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting to Kick-off in Baltimore from March 2 – 6
Biophysical Society

The dynamic five-day Meeting provides attendees with opportunities to share their latest unpublished findings and learn the newest emerging techniques and applications.

Released: 14-Feb-2019 9:45 AM EST
BPS Joins Science Community in Concern over Proposed Title IX Changes
Biophysical Society

The academic and professional disciplinary societies in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medical fields (STEMM) that are signatories of this letter (Signatory Societies) appreciate the opportunity to comment on the U.S. Department of Education’s proposed Title IX implementing regulations, published on November 29, 2018, 83 FR 61462.

Newswise: BPS Announces Jennifer Pesanelli as next Executive Officer, Thanks Ro Kampman for her Service
Released: 13-Dec-2018 3:05 PM EST
BPS Announces Jennifer Pesanelli as next Executive Officer, Thanks Ro Kampman for her Service
Biophysical Society

The Biophysical Society (BPS) announced that Jennifer Pesanelli has been selected as the next Executive Officer of the Society. Current Executive Officer Ro Kampman announced her retirement in June. Pesanelli joins BPS from the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), where she has held a number of positions over the last 20 years.

Newswise: ‘Local Environment’ Plays Key Role in Breast Cancer Progression
16-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
‘Local Environment’ Plays Key Role in Breast Cancer Progression
Biophysical Society

Many of the drugs and therapies available today for treating breast cancer target the cancer cells but tend to neglect the surrounding “local environment,” which includes surrounding tissues. But cancer cells and their local environment are connected, so both undergo chemical and physical changes during tumor development. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Meeting, researchers will present work exploring the role physical changes within a cancer cells’ local environment play in the aggressiveness of breast cancer.

Newswise: Fancy A Jellyfish Chip?
13-Feb-2018 9:30 AM EST
Fancy A Jellyfish Chip?
Biophysical Society

Mathias P. Clausen, a Danish researcher, became intrigued by jellyfish when he bit into the marine delicacy and experienced an unexpected crunch; he decided he wanted to “understand the transformation from soft gel to this crunchy thing.” Clausen and other scientists combined their expertise in biophysics and biochemistry to gain a better understanding of how food preparation affects jellyfish from the inside out. They will present their work during the 62nd Biophysical Society, held Feb. 17-21.

Newswise: ‘Lipid Asymmetry’ Plays Key Role in Activating Immune Cells
14-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
‘Lipid Asymmetry’ Plays Key Role in Activating Immune Cells
Biophysical Society

A cell’s membrane is composed of a bilayer of lipids, and the inside-facing layer is made of different lipids than the outside-facing layer. Because different lipids create membranes with different physical properties, researchers wondered whether different lipid compositions in the bilayer could also lead to different physical properties. They will present their work exploring this “lipid asymmetry” during the 62nd Biophysical Society Meeting, held Feb. 17-21.

Newswise:Video Embedded gut-reactions-to-improve-probiotics
VIDEO
Released: 20-Feb-2018 7:05 AM EST
Gut Reactions to Improve Probiotics
Biophysical Society

Researchers at Stanford University are studying how bacteria living in the gut respond to common changes within their habitat, working with mice. They change the gut environment within the mice, and then measure which bacterial species survive the change and how the gut environment itself has changed. They also study the physiological response of the bacteria -- if they grow faster or slower, or produce different proteins. The work was presented during the Biophysical Society Meeting, held Feb. 17-21.

16-Feb-2018 1:05 PM EST
An Enzyme’s Evolution from Changing Electric Fields and Resisting Antibiotics
Biophysical Society

Bacteria can produce enzymes that make them resistant to antibiotics; one example is the TEM beta-lactamase enzyme, which enables bacteria to develop a resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillin and cephalosporins. Researchers at Stanford University are studying this area -- how an enzyme changes and becomes antibiotic-resistant -- and will present their work during the Biophysical Society’s 62nd Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, 2018.

Newswise: Electric Eel-Inspired Device Reaches 110 Volts
12-Feb-2018 2:05 PM EST
Electric Eel-Inspired Device Reaches 110 Volts
Biophysical Society

In an effort to create a power source for future implantable technologies, a team of researchers developed an electric eel-inspired device that produced 110 volts from gels filled with water, called hydrogels. Their results show potential for a soft power source to draw on a biological system’s chemical energy. Anirvan Guha will present the research during the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, Feb. 17-21.

Newswise: Studying Mitosis’ Structure to Understand the Inside of Cancer Cells
14-Feb-2018 11:05 AM EST
Studying Mitosis’ Structure to Understand the Inside of Cancer Cells
Biophysical Society

Cell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers assemble the spindle fibers that separate the copying chromosomes of DNA. While scientists are familiar with MTOCs’ existence and the role they play in cell division, their actual physical structure remains poorly understood. Researchers are now trying to decipher their molecular architecture, and they will present their work during the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21.

14-Feb-2018 3:25 PM EST
What Makes Circadian Clocks Tick?
Biophysical Society

Circadian clocks arose as an adaptation to dramatic swings in daylight hours and temperature caused by the Earth’s rotation, but we still don’t fully understand how they work. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, Andy LiWang, University of California, Merced, will present his lab’s work studying the circadian clock of blue-green colored cyanobacteria. LiWang’s group discovered that how the proteins move hour by hour is central to cyanobacteria’s circadian clock function.

15-Feb-2018 8:05 AM EST
Using Mutant Bacteria to Study How Changes in Membrane Proteins Affect Cell Functions
Biophysical Society

Phospholipids are water insoluble “building blocks” that define the membrane barrier surrounding cells and provide the structural scaffold and environment where membrane proteins reside. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, William Dowhan from the University of Texas-Houston McGovern Medical School will present his group’s work exploring how the membrane protein phospholipid environment determines its structure and function.

15-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
Ras Protein’s Role in Spreading Cancer
Biophysical Society

Protein systems make up the complex signaling pathways that control whether a cell divides or, in some cases, metastasizes. Ras proteins have long been the focus of cancer research because of their role as “on/off switch” signaling pathways that control cell division and failure to die like healthy cells do. Now, a team of researchers has been able to study precisely how Ras proteins interact with cell membrane surfaces.

Newswise: Flashes of Light Offer Potential for Biomedical Diagnostics
10-Feb-2017 1:05 PM EST
Flashes of Light Offer Potential for Biomedical Diagnostics
Biophysical Society

A group of researchers from the Czech Republic were intrigued that living organisms emit small amounts of light resulting during oxidative metabolism, when oxygen is used to create energy by breaking down carbohydrates. The researchers began to think about how detecting this light could have potential for biomedical diagnostics. At the Biophysical Society’s meeting, Feb. 11-15, 2017, Michal Cifra will present the group’s work within this realm.

Newswise: The Glow of Food Dye Can Be Used to Monitor Food Quality
10-Feb-2017 2:05 PM EST
The Glow of Food Dye Can Be Used to Monitor Food Quality
Biophysical Society

Allura Red, a synthetic food and pharmaceutical color widely used within the U.S., boasts special properties that may make it and other food dyes appropriate as sensors or edible probes to monitor foods and pharmaceuticals. A team of researchers -- from Rutgers University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Massachusetts -- recently made this discovery during an extension of their work identifying and characterizing molecules in foods or food ingredients that might provide signals of food quality, stability or safety.

Newswise: The Flu Gets Cold
10-Feb-2017 3:05 PM EST
The Flu Gets Cold
Biophysical Society

In an effort to one day eliminate the need for an annual flu shot, a group of researchers from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai are exploring the surface of influenza viruses, which are covered by a protein called “hemagglutinin” (HA). This particular protein is used like a key by viruses to open cells and infect them, making it an ideal target for efforts to help the body's immune system fight off a wide range of influenza strains.

9-Feb-2017 1:05 PM EST
New Understandings of Cell Death Show Promise for Preventing Alzheimer’s
Biophysical Society

Currently, the predominant theory behind Alzheimer’s disease is the “amyloid hypothesis,” which states that abnormally increased levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides outside of brain cells produce a variety of low molecular weight Aβ aggregates that are toxic to the nervous system. These Aβ aggregates interact directly with target cells and lead to cell death. During the Biophysical Society’s meeting, being held Feb. 11-15, 2017, Antonio De Maio will present his work hunting for the specific mechanisms behind Aβ-induced toxicity to cells, or cytoxicity.

10-Feb-2017 1:05 PM EST
New Protein Development May Hold the Key to New Disease Therapeutics
Biophysical Society

The 2016 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine was awarded the for discoveries of mechanisms of autophagy, a cellular process much like recycling, where new cellular components are generated from old and damaged ones. Though a relatively simple process conceptually, autophagy plays an important role in many physiological processes and genes essential to the process could be a key component for treating diseases. Now, researchers have reported the first bacterial creation and functional analysis of a protein essential to initiate autophagy: a human homologous gene of Beclin-1. The researchers will present their findings during the Biophysical Society meeting, Feb. 11-15, 2017.

8-Feb-2017 8:05 AM EST
How a Plant Resists Drought
Biophysical Society

Climate change will bring worsening droughts that threaten crops. One potential way to protect crops is by spraying them with a compound that induces the plants to become more drought resistant. Now, by identifying the key molecular mechanism that enables a plant to minimize water loss, researchers may be one step closer to that goal.

8-Feb-2017 8:05 AM EST
Imbalance of Calcium in a Cell's Energy Factory May Drive Alzheimer's Disease
Biophysical Society

Calcium in the mitochondria -- the energy factory of cells -- may be one of the keys to understanding and treating Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Researchers at Temple University have now identified how an imbalance of calcium ions in the mitochondria may contribute to cell death and, specifically, neurodegeneration in brain cells during Alzheimer's and dementia. The findings could eventually point to new therapies for preventing or delaying these diseases. The team will present its work during the 61st Meeting of the Biophysical Society.

8-Feb-2017 9:05 AM EST
Life Under Pressure
Biophysical Society

Life can thrive in some of the most extreme environments on the planet. Microbes flourish inside hot geothermal vents, beneath the frigid ice covering Antarctica and under immense pressures at the bottom of the ocean. For these organisms to survive and function, so must the enzymes that enable them to live and grow. Now, researchers from Georgetown University have homed in on what allows particular enzymes to function under extreme pressures. The team will present its work during the Biophysical Society meeting held Feb. 11-15, 2017.

10-Feb-2017 11:05 AM EST
Nicotine Changes How Nicotinic Receptors Are Grouped on Brain Cells
Biophysical Society

Nicotine -- the primary compound found within tobacco smoke -- is known to change the grouping of some subtypes of nicotine receptors, but the mechanisms for nicotine addiction remain unclear. This inspired a group of University of Kentucky researchers to explore the role nicotine plays in the assembly of nicotine receptors within the brain. During the Biophysical Society meeting, Feb. 11-15, 2017, Faruk Moonschi will present the group’s work, which centers on a fluorescence-based “single molecule” technique they developed.

Newswise: Bridging the Gap Between the Mechanics of Blast Traumatic Brian Injuries and Cell Damage
8-Feb-2017 10:05 AM EST
Bridging the Gap Between the Mechanics of Blast Traumatic Brian Injuries and Cell Damage
Biophysical Society

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a largely silent epidemic that affects roughly two million people each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But the scale at which blast TBI (bTBI) injuries -- in the spotlight as the signature wound of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan -- occur and manifest is unknown. Recent studies within this realm suggest that rapid cavitation bubble collapse may be a potential mechanism for studying bTBI, and during the Biophysical Society’s meeting, Feb. 11-15, 2017, Jonathan Estrada will present his work exploring the mechanics of cavitation-induced injury -- with a goal of better understanding bTBIs.

Newswise: Using Graphene to Fight Bacteria
19-Feb-2016 9:05 AM EST
Using Graphene to Fight Bacteria
Biophysical Society

Scientists at the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore in Rome are studying graphene oxide in the hopes of one day creating bacteria-killing catheters and medical devices. Coating surgical tools with this carbon-based compound could kill bacteria, reducing the need for antibiotics, decreasing the rates of post-operative infections and speeding recovery times.

Newswise: Gene Identified That Helps Wound Healing
19-Feb-2016 9:05 AM EST
Gene Identified That Helps Wound Healing
Biophysical Society

Researchers at Ohio State University have pinpointed a human gene product that helps regulate wound healing and may control scarring in people recovering from severe injuries and damage to certain internal organs. The protein, MG53, travels throughout the bloodstream and helps the body fix injuries to the skin, heart, and other organs without causing scars. It's a discovery that could help heal open wounds, decrease recovery time after surgery and reduce the spread of infections.

Newswise: A New Way to Stretch DNA
19-Feb-2016 2:05 PM EST
A New Way to Stretch DNA
Biophysical Society

Researchers have recently developed a new way to controllably manipulate materials, in this case biomolecules that are too small to see with the naked eye. By stretching molecules like DNA and proteins, scientists can find out important information about the structure, chemical bonding and mechanical properties of the individual molecules that make up our bodies. This understanding could shed light on diseases like cancer and ALS. The new technique is called acoustic force spectroscopy (AFS).

Newswise: The Evolution of Amyloid Toxicity in Alzheimer’s
22-Feb-2016 10:05 AM EST
The Evolution of Amyloid Toxicity in Alzheimer’s
Biophysical Society

A tiny protein known as an “amyloid beta” acts like Jekyll and Hyde in mysterious ways within the human body. Outsized human suffering is linked to this otherwise tiny, innocuous-looking molecule, as it is suspected to be a key player in the neurodegenerative mechanisms underlying Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid beta molecules appear to become toxic within our bodies when they make contact with each other and form small bundles. Oddly, they may become less toxic again as the bundles grow larger in size and form ordered fibrillary plaque deposits. This begs the question: What’s different about these bundles than the single protein molecule and the fibrils?


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