Life News (Arts & Humanities)

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Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Spanish language increasingly more relevant to presidential elections
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Discourse in and about Spanish was present on both sides of the political spectrum, more so leading up to the 2016 presidential election than in previous cycles, according to research conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Newswise: Ancient Maya Reservoirs Contained Toxic Pollution
Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Ancient Maya Reservoirs Contained Toxic Pollution
University of Cincinnati

Mercury, algae made water undrinkable in heart of city

Newswise: Rising Latino studies scholars named IUPLR/UIC Mellon Fellows
Released: 29-Jun-2020 10:55 AM EDT
Rising Latino studies scholars named IUPLR/UIC Mellon Fellows
University of Illinois at Chicago

Presented by the Inter-University Program for Latino Research, or IUPLR, and the University of Illinois at Chicago, each fellow will receive a yearly stipend of $25,000, a faculty mentor in Latino studies, monthly teleconferences with other fellows and opportunities to present their research.

Newswise: MyWorld set to make South West a digital media leader on global stage
Released: 26-Jun-2020 7:45 AM EDT
MyWorld set to make South West a digital media leader on global stage
University of Bristol

The South West is on track to become an international trailblazer in screen-based media thanks to £46 million funding, which will launch a creative media powerhouse called MyWorld and supercharge economic growth, generating more than 700 jobs.

Released: 25-Jun-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Universal right to health could inspire people, organizations to make real change
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Acknowledging health as a universal human right could galvanize people and organizations to make major improvements in health worldwide, according to new research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Released: 23-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Climate change and the rise of the Roman Empire and the fall of the Ptolemies
Yale University

The assassination of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in 44 B.C.E. triggered a 17-year power struggle that ultimately ended the Roman Republic leading to the rise of the Roman Empire.

Newswise: Juneteenth Explained: ‘History Doesn’t Repeat Itself; People Do’
Released: 19-Jun-2020 7:15 AM EDT
Juneteenth Explained: ‘History Doesn’t Repeat Itself; People Do’
University of Kentucky

Today, Juneteenth — which celebrates the abolition of slavery — coincides with protests across the U.S. against racial injustice. Society has become inspired to renew their interest in African American history — a legacy filled with tragedy, inequality, resilience and survival. In a Q&A session, UK's Vanessa Holden shares her expertise and insight on the holiday.

Newswise: Story of jailed 17th-century Iberian “mulatto pilgrim” told in new book by John K. Moore Jr.
Released: 12-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Story of jailed 17th-century Iberian “mulatto pilgrim” told in new book by John K. Moore Jr.
University of Alabama at Birmingham

The book tells the story of a man jailed for impersonating a priest in 1693 Spain, when he was likely trying to escape racial persecution. It gives readers a fascinating look at a centuries-old legal case against a man on pilgrimage and shows how Iberians of black-African ancestry faced discrimination and mistreatment.

Newswise: “Prescribing Art” course teaches med students to recognize bias and better address racial disparities
Released: 12-Jun-2020 4:05 PM EDT
“Prescribing Art” course teaches med students to recognize bias and better address racial disparities
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Can art help doctors better understand their patients and address racial disparities? An innovative collaboration at the University of Alabama at Birmingham uses art to help medical students hone their observational skills, in order to make more accurate diagnoses. “Prescribing Art: How Observation Enhances Medicine” is a partnership between the School of Medicine, the Abroms-Engel Institute for Visual Arts and the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.

Newswise: Walls Are Used by Politicians to Divide Groups of People Even Further, New Book Shows
Released: 8-Jun-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Walls Are Used by Politicians to Divide Groups of People Even Further, New Book Shows
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Walls are used as political tools to accentuate divisions between people, according to a new book co-edited by a faculty member at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Newswise: UIC’s campus-wide COVID-19 efforts
Released: 4-Jun-2020 11:55 AM EDT
UIC’s campus-wide COVID-19 efforts
University of Illinois at Chicago

The UIC Innovation in COVID-19 Working Group (ICWG) was organized at UIC to assign resources to and manage COVID-19 medical-related projects.

Released: 4-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
UNH Experts Available to Comment on What History Teaches About Protests
University of New Hampshire

As activists around the world organize protests sparked by the death of George Floyd, and some escalate into more violent conflicts, experts at the University of New Hampshire point to historical parallels between the current Black Lives Matter protests, and other riots and marches like those of the civil rights era.

Released: 1-Jun-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Study finds gender differences in active learning classrooms
Cornell University

Men participated more in an active learning course in science, technology, engineering and math, while women reported lower perceptions of their scientific abilities, were more aware of gender identity and more likely to feel judged based on gender, a new Cornell-led study has found.

Released: 27-May-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Augmented reality can improve online shopping, study finds
Cornell University

A recent survey found that online shoppers return 70% of the clothing they order, more than any other category of purchase. This has an indirect but real impact on the environment.

Released: 27-May-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Study uncovers gender roles in physics lab courses
Cornell University

Men are overrepresented not only in number but in high-ranking positions within the physics community, according to a new study published May 26 in the journal Physics Education Research. A research team led by Katherine Quinn, Ph.D. ’19, and Natasha Holmes, the Ann S. Bowers Assistant Professor of Physics in the College of Arts and Sciences, examined gender roles in undergraduate physics lab classes as a step toward removing systematic gender biases in the field.

Released: 27-May-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Freedom on the Move digital archive adds K-12 lessons
Cornell University

The Freedom on the Move project, an online collection devoted to fugitives from slavery in 19th century North America, has developed a series of lesson plans to make its crowdsourced database accessible to K-12 teachers and their students.

Released: 15-May-2020 12:05 PM EDT
Why have nursing homes been hit harder by the coronavirus, and should you remove your relative?
University of Michigan

ANN ARBOR—Nursing home residents and workers account for about one-third of COVID-19 deaths in the United States, so far, according to media reports.Sheria Robinson-Lane, a gerontologist and assistant professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing, is an expert in palliative and long-term care and nursing administration.

Released: 15-May-2020 9:30 AM EDT
APS Issues Rare Resolution to Congress
The American Philosophical Society

For the first time in more than 60 years, the American Philosophical Society (APS), founded by Benjamin Franklin and the nation’s oldest learned society, has issued a public resolution calling on Congress to enact a National Defense Education Act for the 21st Century. The resolution has been sent to the bipartisan leadership of the House and Senate.

Newswise:Video Embedded sculptor-designs-builds-interactive-contraptions-from-everyday-materials-to-simulate-human-connections
VIDEO
Released: 14-May-2020 6:25 PM EDT
Sculptor designs, builds ‘interactive contraptions’ from everyday materials to simulate human connections
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Even in isolation, Stacey Holloway can hold a hand, receive a swift kiss on the cheek or give a high-five. She can offer a nose rub, just like the ones she shares with her mother. She just does them all alone — that is, if you don’t count the kinetic, prosthetic models she created to help.

Released: 12-May-2020 1:35 PM EDT
New Discoveries on the Dead Sea Scrolls—Virtual International Conference to be Held May 17-20
New York University

“Dead Sea Scrolls in Recent Scholarship,” an international virtual conference featuring more than three dozen scholars who will share their new discoveries on the ancient religious manuscripts, will be held May 17 through May 20.

Released: 12-May-2020 9:45 AM EDT
Inspired by the Past, Rensselaer Artist Develops Innovative Screenprinting Techniques
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

In his artistic quest to translate his vision, Nathan Meltz used numerous techniques. But it was his innovative use of 21st-century technology with 15th-century printing tools that pushed the boundaries of screenprinting.

Newswise: Chemical evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in highland Lesotho in the first millennium AD
7-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Chemical evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in highland Lesotho in the first millennium AD
University of Bristol

After analysing organic residues from ancient pots, a team of scientists led by the University of Bristol has uncovered new evidence of dairying by hunter-gatherers in the landlocked South African country of Lesotho in the mid-late first millennium AD.

Newswise: UIC graduates first BFA in art education students
Released: 11-May-2020 9:45 AM EDT
UIC graduates first BFA in art education students
University of Illinois at Chicago

As part of their program, CADA students had to take classes in the College of Education.

Newswise: Cornell College professor pivots quickly to teach COVID-19 course
Released: 8-May-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Cornell College professor pivots quickly to teach COVID-19 course
Cornell College

When Cornell College made the decision to offer distance learning to protect its students and faculty from COVID-19, Biology Professor Barbara Christie-Pope began to rethink her Block 8 class.

Newswise: UIC’s Lydia Diamond wins Horton Foote Playwriting Award
Released: 22-Apr-2020 11:10 AM EDT
UIC’s Lydia Diamond wins Horton Foote Playwriting Award
University of Illinois at Chicago

UIC clinical associate professor of theatre within the College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts, was named the 2020 Horton Foote Playwriting Award winner. The award comes with a $25,000 prize that will be awarded in July.

Newswise: Raising Mount Sinai
Released: 20-Apr-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Raising Mount Sinai
Mount Sinai Health System

The musicians of Carnegie Hall, featuring a song and words of support by Jimmy Buffet and others join forces to raise money for the front-line health care staff at the Mount Sinai Health System

Released: 16-Apr-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Newly translated 1500s book teaches the ‘art’ of drinking
Cornell University

When Michael Fontaine, professor of classics in the College of Arts and Sciences, began translating the Latin poem “How to Drink: A Classical Guide to the Art of Imbibing” by German humanist Vincent Obsopoeus, he could not have known it would be published in the middle of a pandemic.

Newswise: UIC library seeks submissions for new UIC COVID-19 story archive project
Released: 16-Apr-2020 1:25 PM EDT
UIC library seeks submissions for new UIC COVID-19 story archive project
University of Illinois at Chicago

New archival project dubbed Six Feet Apart: Stories from UIC during COVID-19.

Released: 14-Apr-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Four UCI professors awarded Guggenheim Fellowships
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., April 14, 2020 — Four professors at the University of California, Irvine – historian Mark LeVine, scientist Andrej Lupták, sculptor Jennifer Pastor and journalist Amy Wilentz – have been named 2020 Guggenheim Fellows. Jennifer Pastor. UCI The faculty members were among 175 U.S. and Canadian scholars, researchers, artists and writers chosen by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation from a pool of nearly 3,000 applicants.

Newswise: Staying home? A geography expert in Buffalo creates a customizable 'coloring book' of city neighborhoods
Released: 10-Apr-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Staying home? A geography expert in Buffalo creates a customizable 'coloring book' of city neighborhoods
University at Buffalo

Anyone can use the map. Kids can use the map as a learning activity by identifying their house; drawing in missing features, like cars, dogs or potholes; or color-coding their neighborhood according to themes such as the number of trees on a block.

Newswise: Hungry for a Fresh Start to Stay Healthy and Calm in Anxious Times? Experts Share Insights in Webinar Series
Released: 9-Apr-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Hungry for a Fresh Start to Stay Healthy and Calm in Anxious Times? Experts Share Insights in Webinar Series
Monday Campaigns

Members of the restaurant and foodservice community are among the groups that are most affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In these anxious times, it’s more important than ever to take care of our physical and emotional health. Dr/Chef Rob Graham, Co-Founder and Chief Medical Officer of FRESH Medicine and Peggy Neu, President of The Monday Campaigns, will share advice for staying healthy and managing stress during these challenging times.

Released: 8-Apr-2020 3:40 PM EDT
FSU expert available to comment on coronavirus impact on UK government
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: April 8, 2020 | 1:43 pm | SHARE: As COVID-19 continues to sweep across the globe, the virus has infected Boris Johnson, prime minister of the United Kingdom. Johnson has delegated authority to other members of his administration while he is receiving care. Meanwhile, Queen Elizabeth II addressed the nation in a rare public broadcast calling for optimism and resolve in the face of the pandemic.

Released: 6-Apr-2020 3:05 PM EDT
How religions around the world are keeping the faith during COVID-19
Michigan State University

COVID-19 has rocked everyday life for people around the world, requiring religious communities to shift worship at a time that many consider the most holiest of the year. Daily and weekly services at churches, synagogues, mosques and temples have transitioned to take place in the home with family members as many places of prayer are closed for the first time in their history.

Newswise: Caregiver Monday: An Initiative Dedicated To Helping Caregivers Take Care of Themselves
Released: 6-Apr-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Caregiver Monday: An Initiative Dedicated To Helping Caregivers Take Care of Themselves
Monday Campaigns

– The Monday Campaigns, a nonprofit public health initiative, has announced Sherri Snelling, caregiving expert and corporate gerontologist, is taking a leading role with Caregiver Monday, a program dedicated to supporting the self-care of 65 million family caregivers by offering weekly health and wellness practices, research and collaborative activities through partner organizations.

Newswise: CCE podcast helps NYS communities meet challenges
Released: 3-Apr-2020 2:15 PM EDT
CCE podcast helps NYS communities meet challenges
Cornell University

Cornell Cooperative Extension Assistant Director Keith Tidball discusses how he and extension associates help New York state residents deal with emergencies in the latest episode of the podcast “Extension Out Loud.”

Newswise: Origami artist turns to folding face masks amid pandemic need
Released: 2-Apr-2020 10:45 AM EDT
Origami artist turns to folding face masks amid pandemic need
Indiana University

Jiangmei Wu is turning to origami to create and potentially provide face masks critically needed to slow COVID-19 infection.

Newswise: Claiming the Director’s Chair
Released: 27-Mar-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Claiming the Director’s Chair
California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

The CSU is preparing the next generation of women filmmakers for California’s multibillion-dollar entertainment industry.

Released: 27-Mar-2020 2:20 PM EDT
Cornell Dairy helps replenish P&C Fresh milk stock
Cornell University

When Cornell suspended classes March 13 and announced the switch to remote work in an effort to stop the spread of coronavirus, P&C Fresh customers scrambled to stock up on bread, butter, toilet paper and milk.

Newswise: How can we be more sure social media
posts about coronavirus are accurate?
Released: 26-Mar-2020 2:20 PM EDT
How can we be more sure social media posts about coronavirus are accurate?
University of Alabama Huntsville

As COVID-19 has increasingly isolated us from each other, we’re relying more and more on social media for a sense of connection and as a source of information about the virus and it’s spread. But how can we be more confident that what we’re seeing is accurate?

Released: 26-Mar-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Bartels Hall hosts surgical mask-sewing effort
Cornell University

On Cornell’s Ithaca campus this week, in the midst of a spring semester suddenly interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic that has emptied dorms, classrooms and community spaces, a basketball court in Bartels Hall stirred to life with a new, urgent mission and two dozen volunteers.

Newswise: BenDodds_web.jpg
Released: 26-Mar-2020 1:00 PM EDT
FSU professor available to comment on the Black Death and its lessons for COVID-19
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: March 26, 2020 | 10:58 am | SHARE: The Black Death looms large in the history of infectious disease.The pandemic — an outbreak of bubonic plague which was probably spread predominantly by rats and fleas — struck Italy in 1347. Recent evidence on mortality suggests that in just a few years, the disease killed around 60 percent of the population in Europe, the part of the world from which historians have the most information.

Newswise: Creative connections for children during COVID-19
Released: 25-Mar-2020 6:15 PM EDT
Creative connections for children during COVID-19
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

NEXT.cc, an organization that serves teachers and students around the world, is reaching out to children and families to share its variety of free science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) projects through its website, Facebook and Linked In.

Released: 25-Mar-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Book retrieval effort gives grad student welcome relief
Cornell University

Benedetta Luciana Sara Carnaghi, a doctoral student in history, didn’t have to wait long to get what she needed to continue her work, thanks to a double-time effort by Cornell University Library staff to reunite graduate students and faculty with their research materials, when campus libraries first closed to the public March 15-16.

Released: 25-Mar-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Cornell history course adds spring 2020 to the archives
Cornell University

Like all other course instructors in the College of Arts and Sciences, Corey Ryan Earle ’07, instructor of The First American University (AMST2001), the popular course about Cornell’s history and unique role, has had to modify his class in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic.


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