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Showing results 107041107050 of 107254
  • Embargo expired:
    25-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2050

Blood Donors Still Fail to Report Risk Factors

JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

Despite the high degree of transfusion safety in the United States today, a measurable percentage of blood donors still hold back reporting risk factors at the time of donation, according to an article in this week's issue of The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Embargoed Tuesday, March 25, 1997

Released:
21-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    24-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2039

New Laparoscopy Makes Kidney Donation Easier

University of Maryland Medical Center/School of Medicine

People who want to donate a kidney to a loved one can now do it with less pain, a shorter hospital stay and a much faster recovery. Surgeons at the University of Maryland Medical Center have made that possible by using a laparoscopic technique to remove the kidney instead of making a large incision. EMBARGOED UNTIL: March 24, 1997

Released:
20-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    23-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2058

Maternal Smoking Linked to Higher Medical Expenses

University of Wisconsin-Madison Department of Medicine

A research team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has, for the first time, documented differences in medical expenses for children whose mothers smoke compared to those whose mothers don't. EMBARGOED UNTIL 5 p.m., CST, SUNDAY, MARCH 23

Released:
22-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2060

Use Tobacco Settlement to Help Children

American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)

The American Academy of Pediatrics today called for monies resulting from a recent legal settlement by a tobacco company to be rolled into state Medicaid programs that benefit children and other victims of tobacco use.

Released:
22-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2057

Evaluating Infants for Child Abuse with MRI

American College of Radiology (ACR)

Studies covering topics ranging from screening mammography for women 40-49 to the best ways to evaluate infants for suspected child abuse will be presented at the American Roentgen Ray Society Annual Meeting. The meeting will be held in Boston, MA, May 4-9 at the Sheraton Boston Hotel and Towers.

Released:
22-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2056

Air Bags Cause Serious Eye Injuries

Stanford University School of Medicine

Activated air bags can inflict severe eye injuries, including blindness, even in minor car accidents, a small-scale study shows.

Released:
22-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2045

Estrogen Maintains Pregnancy, Triggers Fetal Maturation

University of Maryland, Baltimore

Endocrinologists have learned how estrogen helps maintain pregnancy and stimulates the process of fetal maturation. Estrogen helps prevent miscarriage by regulating the production of another hormone, progesterone, and jumpstarts the fetal maturation process by activating fetal production of cortisol, a steroid hormone vital for maturation of lungs and other organs. Embargoed until 3-22-97

Released:
21-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2052

Briefs from the archives journals of the AMA

JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association

Summary of articles in AMA's archives journals.

Released:
21-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2047

Changing roles in health care broaden career opportunities

Purdue University

Job opportunities in the health care industry are growing, especially for nurses and pharmacists with advanced degrees. By the start of the next century, the number of jobs for nurses with advanced degrees will be twice the supply. "This is only one of the indications ã although it may be the most startling ã that the health care industry offers promising futures in a variety of fields," says Sandra Irvin, assistant head of student affairs in the Purdue University School of Nursing.

Released:
21-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 2043

A Drug Pump on a Computer Chip

Whitaker Foundation

Biomedical engineers have built a prototype drug pump the size of a contact lens, a miniature, closed-loop implant that could monitor its own flow rate to ensure a steady stream of medicine.

Released:
21-Mar-1997 12:00 AM EST

Showing results 107041107050 of 107254

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