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Article ID: 7151

PhRMA Survey Finds Revolution in Biotechnology Leading to Promise of New Medicines

Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA)

The biotechnology revolution in medicine has gained remarkable momentum with pharmaceutical companies discovering and developing new therapies that were unimaginable just 20 years ago. The first biotechnology drug was introduced in 1981 and now there are 54 approved medicines helping 60 million patients. But that is just the beginning. A newly-released survey highlights 350 more biotechnology medicines in testing for a host of diseases including cancer, AIDS, heart disease and more, according to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).

Released:
14-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 7150

First Evidence That Localized Arthritis Gene Therapy Heals Distant Diseased Joints

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC)

University of Pittsburgh researchers have made the unprecedented and totally unexpected finding that localized gene therapy for arthritis produces healing effects on distant joints affected with the disease. Results of this landmark study, conducted in a rabbit model of rheumatoid arthritis, appear in the April 15 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It is a major advance in the quest to bring arthritis gene therapy into widespread clinical use.

Released:
14-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 7146

Retinoic acid used in cancer treatment

Cornell University

Cancer biologists working at Cornell University with forms of leukemia are demonstrating how retinoic acid alters the chemical signals from oncogenes, halting the uncontrolled cell division that produces cancer. It could lead to enhanced therapies for leukemia and also highlights the cancer-prevention role of carotenes.

Released:
14-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 7133

Purdue Finding May Snuff Out The Sniffles

Purdue University

Purdue University scientists have unlocked the secrets of a receptor that the common cold virus uses as an entryway to infect human cells. Their findings, detailed in the April 14 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may help slam the door on one of the most troublesome and universal pathogens known to man.

Released:
14-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 7101

U OF Minnesota Research Points to Better Blood Clotting Control

University of Minnesota

University of Minnesota biochemists have synthesized a modified form of a crucial blood clotting factor and found it induces clotting much faster than the naturally occurring form of the factor. It could lead to better treatments for hemophilia and better overall control of clotting.

Released:
13-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 7085

Possible trigger for heart failure identified in lab animal studies

American Heart Association (AHA)

DALLAS, April 14 -- Researchers have demonstrated in laboratory animals that tumor necrosis factor alpha, a protein produced in the heart, can lead to congestive heart failure. The finding may pave the way for a new treatment for the nation's fastest-growing heart disease. The studies, from two different research teams, appear in today's Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Released:
13-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7127

Tips from American Thoracic Society April Journals

American Thoracic Society (ATS)

1) Much of TB Prevalence Attributed to Race and Ethnicity Now Seen as Result of Low Socioeconomic Status, 2) Twins Study in Finland Shows That Presence of Asthma in Successive Generations Due More to Genes than Environment, 3) Asthma Reported to be Increasing in All Ages Not Just Young Males

Released:
10-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 7119

UConn scientist creates artificial tendon

University of Connecticut

Good news for Achilles tendon injuries: a professor of chemistry and materials science at the University of Connecticut has created an artificial tendon out of biodegradable materials that will assist the body in developing a new tendon and shorten the recovery period.

Released:
10-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 7117

Neurology Meeting: Answers to Brain Diseases Sought in Space, Underwater Research

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

The links between underwater and space research and possible solutions to a host of neurological problems -- such brain injury, stroke and epilepsy -- will be explored at a Washington, D.C., meeting by the Space and Underwater Neurology Research Group of the World Federation of Neurology. Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) will be the featured speaker.

Released:
10-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 7109

New Study: Natural Vitamin E Retained Two Times Better Than Synthetic

Blitz & Associates

Natural vitamin E is retained in humans two times greater than the synthetic form of the supplement, according to a new study published in the April 1998 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AM J Clin Nutr 1998;67:669-84).

Released:
10-Apr-1998 12:00 AM EDT

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