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Article ID: 6659

Sinai Hospital Offers New Alternative to Hysterectomy

Sinai Hospital of Baltimore

Sinai Hospital of Baltimore is the first in Maryland to offer a new minimally invasive thermal treatment for women suffering from menorrhagia, excessive menstrual bleeding. In many cases, the treatment, which removes the endometrium, the tissue lining the uterus, can replace a hysterectomy, the most common form of therapy for this problem.

Released:
6-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 6653

An Owl's Early Lessons Leave Their Mark on the Brain

Stanford University School of Medicine

STANFORD-- Lessons learned early in life can, at least in owls, leave a permanent mark in the brain. The mark allows an adult owl to re-learn a task that it learned early in life, though the same task can never be learned by an adult who has not had such training as a juvenile.

Released:
6-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 6649

Hypertension Medication May Decrease Risk of Heart Attacks in Diabetics

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

People with Type 2 diabetes and high-blood pressure had a decreased incidence of heart attacks with the use of an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor when compared with a calcium channel blocker to control their hypertension, according to a University of Colorado Health Sciences Center study published in the March 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Released:
6-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 6631

New Imaging Technique Pinpoints Dead Heart Muscle

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have developed the first precise, noninvasive means of measuring a chemical in the heart tied to the extent of muscle damage from a heart attack.

Released:
6-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 6500

Nighttime blood pressure measurement can identify high risk of stroke

American Heart Association (AHA)

High blood pressure is already a primary risk factor for stroke, but Japanese researchers say that hypertensive patients who also exhibit a minimal nighttime dip in blood pressure may be at even higher risk, according to a study published in today's Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Released:
6-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 6644

Women, Ethnic Groups Wait Longer for Liver Transplantation

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

A Johns Hopkins School of Public Health study of the factors that influence how long a person who needs a liver transplant has to wait has shown that women, Hispanic-Americans, Asian-Americans, and children waited longer than other groups for transplants.

Released:
5-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 6643

Snipping Inflammation in the Bud; New Agents May Provide Relief

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Trying a new approach to controlling the process of inflammation, scientists have forged a new class of synthetic molecules that offer a new strategy for treating pain, swelling and the other hallmarks of injury or illness.

Released:
5-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 6640

At Last, a Reliable Diagnostic for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Research Corporation Technologies

A new immunoassay may help physicians identify rheumatoid arthritis (RA) earlier and begin treatment to prevent or postpone the debilitating and costly consequences of the disease. The test also may remove much of the guesswork from managing patients with severe forms of RA.

Released:
5-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 6617

American Heart Association comment on New England Journal of Medicine report on calcium antagonist nisoldipine (March 5 issue)

American Heart Association (AHA)

A study in the NEJM titled "The effect of nisoldipine as compared with enalapril on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes and hypertension," finds an increased risk of fatal and non-fatal heart attacks among individuals taking the calcium antagonist nisoldipine compared to individuals taking enalapril, which is a member of a class of drugs called ACE-inhibitors.

Released:
4-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 6626

Stress Faced by Air Traffic Controllers Not Linked to High Blood Pressure

American Society of Hypertension (ASH)

Despite the stress and tension of their jobs, air traffic controllers do not experience a greater incidence of high blood pressure than people in less stressful work environments, according to a study published in the current issue of the American Journal of Hypertension.

Released:
3-Mar-1998 12:00 AM EST

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