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Showing results 1157111580 of 11697

Article ID: 2724

Pay Hikes, Not Promotions, Help Keep Valued Employees

Cornell University, Johnson School

Cornell University researchers have found that pay hikes, not promotions, are critical in retaining high-performing employees. Looking at more than 5,000 petroleum company employees showed that high salary growth proved critical in retaining high performers. promotions, on the other hand, had no effect on turnover of those high performers.

Released:
7-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 2719

U.S.-Japan Study Group Offers Environmental Policy Recommendations

Yale University School of Medicine

Trade and environment experts from the United States and Japan today (July 2) issued a joint statement offering recommendations for better management of environmental issues by international organizations such as the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum (APEC) and the World Trade Organization (WTO). Recommendations included a more focused mandate for the WTO's Committee on Trade and Environment, and closer attention by policy makers to the idea of forming a global environmental organization that would operate in tandem with the WTO.

Released:
7-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 2718

Too Much of a Good Thing?

Stanford Graduate School of Business

In business, too much of a good thing can be hazardous to your health, says Stanford Business School's William Barnett, who took a close look at the volatile semiconductor industry to see why certain companies survive the industry's notorious shakeouts and others do not. He found that when a company introduces more than one product at a time, the firm benefits from its larger size, but also suffers a higher risk of failure. In other words, while growth is good, growing all at once is not.

Released:
3-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 2713

Entrepreneurs Overconfident, Prone to Generalizations

Ohio State University

Entrepreneurs think differently than corporate managers when it comes to making business decisions -- and not in ways that seem favorable at first glance. A new study of 219 entrepreneurs and managers found that entrepreneurs were more likely to be overconfident about the correctness of their decisions and were more prone to make broad generalizations based on limited experience.

Released:
3-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 2710

Some Workaholics May Be Happy and Productive

Ohio State University

Workaholics have a bad reputation as people whose obsession with work is often harmful to themselves and possibly even bad for their companies. But a new analysis of previous research suggests that there may be "good" workaholics: people who work a lot because they enjoy their jobs, have strong career identities and a desire for upward mobility.

Released:
3-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 2709

Corporations Learn from Each Other

Stanford Graduate School of Business

We're all supposed to learn from the success and failures of others. It's far less painful than making our own mistakes. But do corporations really learn from the experiences of other firms? Stanford Business School's Pamela Haunschild finds that they do.

Released:
2-Jul-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 2699

Low-cost Production, High-tech Success

Stanford Graduate School of Business

Innovation is always necessary if a firm is to become a leader in the high-technology area, say Stanford Business School's Evan Porteus and Glen Schmidt. But while the ability to innovate can get a firm to the top, it alone is unlikely to keep it there as new technologies and the generations of products that accompany them arise.

Released:
28-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 2698

Beware Securities Analysts' Forecasts

Stanford Graduate School of Business

The securities research analysts who advise your broker on the best stock market picks may not be trying to mislead you deliberately, but beware of their rosy attitudes.

Released:
28-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 2694

Campus 'gender friendly' workshops getting attention

Purdue University

A Purdue University effort to create a more positive environment for female engineering and science students is attracting the attention of colleges, universities and the corporate world.

Released:
27-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 2689

Eng Receives Fulbright Scholar Award

Babson College

Robert J. Eng, associate professor of marketing at Babson College, was selected by the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board to receive a Fulbright Scholar award to the People's Republic of China. His research will center on two emerging business issues for China: finding, attracting, and retaining qualified personnel; and examining the country's distribution and transportation networks.

Released:
27-Jun-1997 12:00 AM EDT

Showing results 1157111580 of 11697

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