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Article ID: 971

Disordering Brain Gives Clues to Brain Disorders

Harvard Medical School

In the January π97 Neuron, Harvard Medical School researchers report that mutant mice lacking a certain gene fail to weave the neatly layered pattern that is the trademark of the cerebral cortex, a finding that comes one step closer to understanding how the cortex unfolds during embryonic development.

Released:
3-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 970

Genetic Cause for Common Birthmarks

Harvard Medical School

Researchers at Harvard Medical School report in the December 27 Cell their discovery of a genetic mutation responsible for venous malformations, the most common type of birthmark and describe what role a gene might play in the assembly of veins during embryogenesis.

Released:
3-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 968

HDL Lowers Stroke Death Risk

American Heart Association (AHA)

News about the so-called ìgoodî cholesterol -- HDL -- just keeps getting better. Elevated high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol -- which has been shown to increase a personís resistance against heart attacks -- may also protect against ìischemicî stroke, Israeli scientists report today in the American Heart Association journal Stroke. Ischemic stroke, the most common form of stroke, occurs when blood flow to part of the brain is blocked. The other type, ìhemorrhagicî stroke, is caused by bleeding from a ruptured blood vessel. Study co-author Uri Goldbourt, Ph.D., of the Neufeld Cardiac Research Institute at Sheba Medical Center in Tel-Hashomer, Israel, says, ìOur study indicates that high levels of HDL may be associated with protection against more than one vascular disease entity.î

Released:
3-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 964

Replacement For Solvents

University of Kansas

A solvent used in the food-processing trade is expected to help the pharmaceutical industry replace environmentally unfriendly and expensive solvents in the manufacture of drugs. By using supercritical carbon dioxide, or CO2, in the pharmaceutical process, researchers at the University of Kansas have successfully replaced some chemical solvents.

Released:
3-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 963

Patient Referral Patterns

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

The federal Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR) today announced the funding of 13 new research projects: eight projects to determine how the referral of primary care patients to medical specialists and other specialized services affects the quality and cost of health care; and five projects to improve primary care services overall.

Released:
3-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 961

Most Americans Very Satisfied with Dental Care

American Dental Association (ADA)

Most patients are very happy with their dentists and their dental care, according to a recently released national survey.

Released:
2-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 960

January 1, 1997 Annals of Internal Medicine Tips

American College of Physicians (ACP)

January 1, 1997 Annals of Internal Medicine Tips 1) Coronary Artery Bypass Rates in New York State and Ontario Differ, But Which Rate is Right?; 2) Polycystic Ovaries Associated with More Extensive Heart Disease, Metabolic Abnormalities; 3) Satiety Hormone is Higher in Obese People; No Genetic Factor Found; 4) Three Conditions for Bedside Rationing

Released:
2-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 959

Dental X-Rays Screening for Stroke, Osteoporosis

American Dental Association (ADA)

Two studies published in the December issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA) suggest that dental x-rays are effective screening tools for strokes and osteoporosis.

Released:
2-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 958

No Amalgam Bans in Effect

American Dental Association (ADA)

Dentists around the world are using amalgams (silver fillings) every day to fill decayed teeth, despite some erroneous news reports stating that many countries have banned the use of amalgams. International dental experts meeting recently at the American Dental Association (ADA) headquarters in Chicago discussed the use of amalgam in their respective countries.

Released:
2-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Jan-1996 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 1701

Nevirapine And Protease Inhibitor "Cocktails" Safe

Northwestern University

Nevirapine, a potent new drug used to treat HIV-infected patients, can be safely used in combination with protease inhibitors, according to one of the nation's leading AIDS researchers. Nevirapine is a member of a class of antiretroviral drugs called non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Embargoed: Friday, Jan. 24, 1997, at 9 a.m. EST

Released:
22-Jan-1997 12:00 AM EST

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