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Newswise: Deep learning system will monitor birds at solar facilities
Released: 3-Jun-2020 11:40 AM EDT
Deep learning system will monitor birds at solar facilities
Argonne National Laboratory

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has been awarded $1.3 million from DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Office to develop technology that can cost-effectively monitor avian interactions with solar energy infrastructure.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 11:20 AM EDT
American College of Surgeons releases tools to prepare patients for operations during the time of COVID-19
American College of Surgeons (ACS)

As health care facilities resume operations paused due to COVID-19, a new survey shows many people are reluctant to undergo procedures and may not reschedule necessary care while COVID-19 continues to circulate in communities. To help surgeons and hospitals address patient concerns, ACS has released a new resource document.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 11:20 AM EDT
One-of-a-kind Microscope Enables Breakthrough in Quantum Science
American Technion Society

Technion-Israel Institute of Technology researchers recently made an extraordinary breakthrough in the field of quantum matter when they documened, for the first time, a new type of interaction between light and matter.

Newswise: First Optical Measurements of Milky Way’s Fermi Bubbles Probe Their Origin
2-Jun-2020 1:15 PM EDT
First Optical Measurements of Milky Way’s Fermi Bubbles Probe Their Origin
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Using the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper telescope, astronomers have for the first time measured the Fermi Bubbles in the visible light spectrum. The Fermi Bubbles are two enormous outflows of high-energy gas that emanate from the Milky Way and the finding refines our understanding of the properties of these mysterious blobs.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
‘Terminator’ protein halts cancer-causing cellular processes
Cornell University

New research from the lab of Hening Lin, professor of chemistry and chemical biology in the College of Arts and Sciences, finds that a protein called TiPARP acts as a terminator for several cancer-causing transcription factors, including HIF-1, which is implicated in many cancers, including breast cancer. The research demonstrates that TiPARP, therefore, is a tumor suppressor.

Newswise: First Do No Harm – Researchers Urge Halt in Prescribing Hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19
Released: 3-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT
First Do No Harm – Researchers Urge Halt in Prescribing Hydroxycholoroquine for COVID-19
Florida Atlantic University

Researchers urge a moratorium on prescribing chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, with or without azithromycin, to treat or prevent COVID-19, and caution that the reassuring safety profile of hydroxychloroquine may be more apparent than real. Safety data derive from decades of prescriptions by clinicians, primarily for their patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, both of which are of greater prevalence in younger and middle age women, who are at very low risk of fatal heart outcomes due to hydroxychloroquine.

Newswise: Cognitive behavior therapy tops other psychotherapies in reducing inflammation
3-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Cognitive behavior therapy tops other psychotherapies in reducing inflammation
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A review of 56 randomized clinical trials finds that psychological and behavioral therapies may be effective non-drug treatments for reducing disease-causing inflammation in the body.

Newswise: Scientists Reveal How Mutations in Metabolism Can Drive Cancers
1-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Scientists Reveal How Mutations in Metabolism Can Drive Cancers
Yale Cancer Center

Yale Cancer Center scientists have identified mutations in metabolite-producing genes as a disruption of DNA repair. These mutation-driven “oncometabolites” may make cells more prone to developing cancer—but also more vulnerable to new cancer treatment strategies.

Newswise: Consumers Increasingly Demand That Brands Take a Stance During Turmoil: Maryland Smith Expert
Released: 3-Jun-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Consumers Increasingly Demand That Brands Take a Stance During Turmoil: Maryland Smith Expert
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Consumers, especially millennials, want to see their brands and companies take a stand on social issues. And In times of turmoil, companies may respond differently, but the intent behind their messaging must be authentic and responsible.

1-Jun-2020 1:15 PM EDT
Untangling the Effects of Past Adversity and Alcohol Use Disorder on Acute Stress Responses
Research Society on Alcoholism

The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is the body’s key stress response system. By driving production of the stress hormone cortisol, and then ensuring a return to baseline levels, the HPA axis regulates our reaction to stressful events. Chronic alcohol use, however, can lead to persistently elevated cortisol, reducing the body’s capacity to respond appropriately to stress. Among people in treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD), the blunted stress response predicts risk of relapse and a return to drinking. Longer-term life stress, including childhood adversity, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and chronic stress, can also dampen HPA axis function, complicating interpretation of the alterations evident in people with AUD. However, it is not known how stress and trauma intereact with AUD to affect HPA-axis reactivity. A new report in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research by researchers from the universities of Texas, Florida, and Colorado addresses this issue, u

Newswise: NSF CAREER grant recipient offers potential boost for stem cell therapy
Released: 3-Jun-2020 9:55 AM EDT
NSF CAREER grant recipient offers potential boost for stem cell therapy
Penn State College of Engineering

Xiaojun “Lance” Lian, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Penn State, has received a $500,000, five-year Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). 

Newswise: UK, ArtemiLife Partner to Test for Anti-Cancer Activity of Artemisia Annua Extracts
Released: 3-Jun-2020 9:35 AM EDT
UK, ArtemiLife Partner to Test for Anti-Cancer Activity of Artemisia Annua Extracts
University of Kentucky

The University of Kentucky and ArtemiLife Inc. will collaborate on a clinical study using the extract of a medicinal plant grown in Kentucky to test for anti-cancer activity of Artemisia annua and to determine the recommended dose of Artemisia annua for future clinical trials.

Newswise: UK Study Finds Many Colon Cancer Patients Not Receiving Standard of Care Therapy
Released: 3-Jun-2020 9:35 AM EDT
UK Study Finds Many Colon Cancer Patients Not Receiving Standard of Care Therapy
University of Kentucky

A new University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center study finds that many Kentucky patients with colon cancer are not receiving the recommended standard of care therapy for their disease.

Newswise: Acoustics and biomedical engineering professor receives NSF CAREER grant
Released: 3-Jun-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Acoustics and biomedical engineering professor receives NSF CAREER grant
Penn State College of Engineering

Julianna Simon, assistant professor of acoustics and biomedical engineering in the Penn State College of Engineering, was recently awarded an Early Career Development Program (CAREER) grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Newswise: Science Snapshots May 2020
Released: 3-Jun-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Science Snapshots May 2020
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

World’s forests are growing younger, U.S. wind plant performance changes with age, and fungi food choices opens the door to better methods for producing bio-based products

29-May-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Study finds PFAS exposure may cause early menopause in women
Endocrine Society

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substance (PFAS) exposure may cause menopause to occur two years earlier in women, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Newswise: Don’t Ignore Signs of Stroke or Heart Attack Due to COVID-19 Crisis
Released: 3-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Don’t Ignore Signs of Stroke or Heart Attack Due to COVID-19 Crisis
Hackensack Meridian Health

Many hospitals across the country have noticed an increase of people ignoring life-threatening symptoms. They are choosing to stay home, instead of seeking care at an emergency department. When they do arrive at the hospital, the patient has lost critical time to receive life-saving treatments.

Newswise:Video Embedded newswise-live-expert-panel-for-june-2nd-2020-police-brutality-and-blm-protests
VIDEO
Released: 3-Jun-2020 8:30 AM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Police Brutality and BLM Protests: Newswise Live Expert Panel for June 2nd, 2PM EDT
Newswise

Demonstrations spread across the U.S. to confront the deaths of black men and women at the hands of police. Experts will discuss how to prevent more unarmed black men and women from being killed by police, and what can be done by individuals outside of law enforcement.

Newswise: ATS Announces $500,000 COVID-19 Crisis Fund Support from AstraZeneca
Released: 3-Jun-2020 8:15 AM EDT
ATS Announces $500,000 COVID-19 Crisis Fund Support from AstraZeneca
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

June 3, 2020 –Today, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) announced a $500,000 donation from AstraZeneca to the ATS COVID-19 Crisis Fund, launched to support the Society’s all-encompassing efforts to fight COVID-19.

Newswise: New test for rare disease identifies children who may benefit from simple supplement
3-Jun-2020 4:20 AM EDT
New test for rare disease identifies children who may benefit from simple supplement
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute and the Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa in Spain have created a test that determines which children with CAD deficiency—a rare metabolic disease—are likely to benefit from receiving uridine, a nutritional supplement that has dramatically improved the lives of other children with the condition. The study was published in Genetics in Medicine.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 6:55 AM EDT
Rapid coronavirus test speeds up access to urgent care and will free up beds ahead of winter
University of Cambridge

• The SAMBA II diagnostic device cuts COVID-19 test result times from over 24 hours to just two hours. • First “real-world” study of SAMBA devices on hospital wards finds patient time on COVID ‘holding wards’ was almost halved. • Researchers say faster tests helped free up beds and expedite access to life-saving treatments such as organ transplants – and might make all the difference later this year.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 6:40 AM EDT
Making sense of climate scenarios: New toolkit available for decision makers
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

To make climate scenarios work for decision makers, an international team of researchers have developed a comprehensive interactive online platform.

2-Jun-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Premier nutrition education conference goes virtual in 2020
Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

Distinguished nutrition educators from around the world will gather in a truly global event this summer as the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior hosts its 53rd Annual Conference entirely online.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 5:55 AM EDT
Recycling plastics together, simple and fast
Shinshu University

Recycling plastic faces several challenges, one of which is recycling different types of plastics together, because they have varying properties, each of which need to be addressed accordingly.

Newswise: 233506_web.jpg
Released: 3-Jun-2020 5:30 AM EDT
Genetic study reveals similarities and differences of COVID-19 and SARS viruses
University of Tokyo

Researchers have identified specific portions of the genetic codes of the COVID-19 and SARS viruses that may promote the viruses' lifecycles. The new technique is researchers' first tool for determining what genetic sequences stored as RNA - DNA's chemical cousin - are more stable.

Newswise: One in six medications prescribed to older people 
causing more harm than good
Released: 3-Jun-2020 5:05 AM EDT
One in six medications prescribed to older people causing more harm than good
University of South Australia

Millions of people around the world over the age of 70 are taking at least one medication every day that is causing them more harm than good, leading to falls, confusion, hospitalisation and even death.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 4:30 AM EDT
Spine Surgeons Face COVID-19 Challenges Worldwide
Rush University Medical Center

Spine surgeons across the world are experiencing effects of COVID-19, including canceled procedures, changes in clinical roles, anxiety and risk of exposure to the disease themselves due to insufficient protective equipment. An international team of researchers reported these findings recently in the Global Spine Journal.

Newswise: Stomach issues, history of substance abuse found in teen vaping study
Released: 3-Jun-2020 4:15 AM EDT
Stomach issues, history of substance abuse found in teen vaping study
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A study of teens diagnosed with the vaping-linked respiratory disease EVALI revealed that most also had gastrointestinal symptoms and a history of psychosocial factors, including substance abuse, UT Southwestern researchers found in one of the first clinical reviews of its kind.

Released: 3-Jun-2020 3:50 AM EDT
Mindfulness Improves Decision-Making, Attention in Children with Autism
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

School-based mindfulness programs can improve decision-making skills and teach children with autism to focus attention and react less impulsively through breathing exercises that will allow them to reduce anxiety, according to Rutgers researchers.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 5:05 PM EDT
New discovery could highlight areas where earthquakes are less likely to occur
Cardiff University

Scientists from Cardiff University have discovered specific conditions that occur along the ocean floor where two tectonic plates are more likely to slowly creep past one another as opposed to drastically slipping and creating catastrophic earthquakes.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 4:55 PM EDT
A satisfying romantic relationship may improve breast cancer survivors’ health
Ohio State University

Breast cancer survivors in romantic relationships who feel happy and satisfied with their partners may be at lower risk for a host of health problems, new research suggests.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Ombudsmen advocate for long-term care residents at a distance during COVID-19
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Social isolation necessitated by COVID-19 weighs on everyone, especially older adults and those living with disabilities who may have already felt relatively isolated before the pandemic even started, said Greg Shelley, program manager of the Harris County Long-term Care Ombudsman Program at Cizik School of Nursing at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Likewise, the staff and volunteers who are dedicated to advocating for rights, health, and safety of seniors miss face-to-face visits.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 4:40 PM EDT
UCI scientists engineer human cells with squid-like transparency
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 2, 2020 — Octopuses, squids and other sea creatures can perform a disappearing act by using specialized tissues in their bodies to manipulate the transmission and reflection of light, and now researchers at the University of California, Irvine have engineered human cells to have similar transparent abilities.

Newswise: New research deepens understanding of Earth’s interaction with the solar wind
Released: 2-Jun-2020 4:15 PM EDT
New research deepens understanding of Earth’s interaction with the solar wind
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

A team of scientists at PPPL and Princeton University has reproduced a process that occurs in space to deepen understanding of what happens when the Earth encounters the solar wind.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 3:50 PM EDT
Small study demonstrates sample inactivation may lead to SARS-CoV-2 false negatives
American Society for Microbiology (ASM)

To protect medical laboratory personnel from infection when testing clinical samples for SARS-CoV-2, most laboratories inactivate the virus before testing.

Newswise:Video Embedded antibiotic-destroying-genes-widespread-in-bacteria-in-soil-and-on-people
VIDEO
Released: 2-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Antibiotic-destroying genes widespread in bacteria in soil and on people
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis and the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have found that genes that confer the power to destroy tetracycline antibiotics are widespread in bacteria. But the researchers have also created a chemical compound that shields tetracyclines from destruction, restoring the antibiotics lethality. The findings indicate an emerging threat to one of the most widely used classes of antibiotics — but also a promising way to protect against that threat.

Newswise: 233541_web.jpg
Released: 2-Jun-2020 3:30 PM EDT
New technique takes 3D imaging an octave higher
Colorado State University

A collaboration between Colorado State University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign resulted in a new, 3D imaging technique to visualize tissues and other biological samples on a microscopic scale, with potential to assist with cancer or other disease diagnoses.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Study shows impact of licensing restrictions on immigrant farmworkers
State University of New York at Geneseo

A three-year study by SUNY Geneseo anthropologists shows that driver licensing restrictions led to increased social isolation and health risks for immigrant agricultural workers. The researchers identified factors that prevent immigrants from leaving farms where they work and the detrimental effects of isolation.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Luxury Handbag Wearers Likely to Behave Selfishly, Study Shows
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Recently published findings show that wearing and using a luxury good, like a Prada handbag, can lead ordinary people to behave badly.

Newswise: Pulmonary Embolism and COVID-19
Released: 2-Jun-2020 3:10 PM EDT
Pulmonary Embolism and COVID-19
Henry Ford Health System

Researchers at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit say early diagnosis of a life-threatening blood clot in the lungs led to swifter treatment intervention in COVID-19 patients. In a new study published recently in the journal Radiology, researchers found that 51 percent of patients found to have a pulmonary embolism, or PE, were diagnosed in the Emergency Department, the entry point for patients being admitted to the hospital.

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Embargo will expire: 9-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 2-Jun-2020 3:05 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 9-Jun-2020 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Notre Dame researchers to create material for new antimicrobial mask
Released: 2-Jun-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Notre Dame researchers to create material for new antimicrobial mask
University of Notre Dame

Scientists and engineers are collaborating to translate existing water filtration technology to create a new fabric that will not only capture viruses, like the coronavirus, but also deactivate them.

Newswise: Vasculitis Foundation Launches Vasculitis Visionaries Podcast Series
Released: 2-Jun-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Vasculitis Foundation Launches Vasculitis Visionaries Podcast Series
Vasculitis Foundation

The Vasculitis Foundation rolls out new podcast series, designed to educate and provide insight into rare, autoimmune blood vessel disorder.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Behaviors and Traits that Help and Hinder Social Status, According to Evolutionary Psychologists
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

Beyond fame and fortune, certain traits and behaviors may have pervasive influence in climbing the social ladder, according to a study by evolutionary psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin.

Released: 2-Jun-2020 2:35 PM EDT
ELITechGroup Announces the Launch of FreezePoint™ Freezing Point Osmometer
ELITechGroup

ELITechGroup, recognized worldwide for proven performance and reliability of clinical laboratory instruments is pleased to announce the release of FreezePoint™ Freezing Point Osmometer.


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