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Newswise: An egg a day not tied to risk of heart disease

An egg a day not tied to risk of heart disease

McMaster University

The controversy about whether eggs are good or bad for your heart health may be solved, and about one a day is fine. A team of researchers from the Population Health Research Institute of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences found the answer by analyzing data from three large, long-term multinational studies.

Channels: All Journal News, Cardiovascular Health, Diabetes, Health Food, Nutrition,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 1:05 PM EST
Newswise: The Pediatric Cancer Genome Project at 10: The impact lives on

The Pediatric Cancer Genome Project at 10: The impact lives on

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Ten years ago this week St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine unveiled an ambitious collaboration to identify the genetic changes that lead to some of the world’s deadliest childhood cancers. The researchers proposed a three-year, $65 million project to sequence the complete normal and cancer genomes of more than 600 childhood cancer patients.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Children's Health, Clinical Trials, Genetics, Healthcare,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 12:50 PM EST
Research Results
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Most Young People Do Not Vape, and Even Fewer Vape Regularly

New York University

While youth vaping rates have increased in recent years, most middle and high school students don’t vape or smoke and very few vape or smoke daily, finds a study led by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health.

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Public Health, Smoking,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 12:45 PM EST
Announcement
Newswise: Tiny containers transport targeted treatments

Tiny containers transport targeted treatments

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Promising intracellular protein-based therapeutics have been of limited use due to the difficulty of delivery into diseased cells. Now bioengineers have developed nanoparticles that can deliver these therapeutics to their targets—avoiding degradation and toxic interactions with healthy tissues.

Channels: All Journal News, Cancer, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Engineering, Nanotechnology, Pharmaceuticals, National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Eye Institute (NEI), Grant Funded News,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 12:35 PM EST
Research Results
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Study shows orthostatic hypotension not associated with higher risk of adverse events among patients undergoing more intensive blood pressure treatment

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have found that orthostatic hypotension was not associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events, falls, or fainting among participants in The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial. In a study published in the journal Hypertension, the scientists showed that hypertension treatment had no impact on the link between OH and cardiovascular outcomes or other adverse events.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Blood, Cardiovascular Health, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Pharmaceuticals, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
27-Jan-2020 12:30 PM EST
Research Results
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Blood pressure drug linked to lower risk of gout

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

A new study led by physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) reports that the antihypertensive drug amlodipine lowered long-term gout risk compared to two other drugs commonly prescribed to lower blood pressure. The findings are published in the Journal of Hypertension.

Channels: All Journal News, Blood, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Pain, Pharmaceuticals, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
27-Jan-2020 12:30 PM EST
Research Results
Embargo will expire:
29-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
27-Jan-2020 12:00 PM EST

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Feature Expert
Newswise: Children to bear the burden of negative health effects from climate change

Children to bear the burden of negative health effects from climate change

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

The grim effects that climate change will have on pediatric health outcomes was the focus of a “Viewpoint” article published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation by Susan E. Pacheco, MD, an expert at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Channels: All Journal News, Children's Health, Climate Science, Environmental Science, Mental Health, Psychology and Psychiatry, Natural Disasters,

Released:
27-Jan-2020 11:35 AM EST
Research Results
Embargo will expire:
29-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
27-Jan-2020 11:05 AM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Research Results


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