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Released: 23-Jul-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Webinar: Risk Perspectives in Turbulent Times
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Risk experts representing the University of Maryland's Center for Financial Policy and Freddie Mac will discuss the evolution of enterprise risk management, top risk issues affecting the mortgage industry and the role of analytics in risk management in a free, July 31 webinar.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 2:30 PM EDT
Teen Museum Educators Increase Engagement, Learning, in Tween Visitors
North Carolina State University

A new study finds teen docents at museums have an overall positive effect on visitor experiences, learning and information retention. The positive effects accrued across age groups regardless of museum type, but were most apparent in children ages 9 to 11.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 2:25 PM EDT
The best players are passionate about football
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

The best footballers (soccer players) have a high degree of passion and grit.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Humanizing hotel brands during COVID-19 could encourage tourists to return
University of East Anglia

Hotels should build an emotional attachment with tourists when communicating during crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic if they are to encourage them to return, according to new research.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Salisbury University Expands Test-Optional Admissions for Students Applying for 2021
Salisbury University

In 2006, Salisbury University became the first campus in the University System of Maryland with a test-optional admissions policy for students with cumulative high school grade point averages of 3.5 or higher. Now, SU is expanding the policy to all current high school students applying to enroll in 2021 to help ease some of the burden caused by COVID-19.

Newswise: Most productive workforce may require indefinite affirmative action, study shows
Released: 23-Jul-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Most productive workforce may require indefinite affirmative action, study shows
University of Notre Dame

Research from the University of Notre Dame shows it is often best for optimal efficiency if the minority group is overrepresented in the workforce relative to the majority — a conclusion that flies in the face of the conventional wisdom that affirmative action will eventually be obsolete.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 11:45 AM EDT
When it comes to happiness, what's love got to do with it?
Michigan State University

How accurate was William Shakespeare when he said, "'Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all,"? Researchers from Michigan State University conducted one of the first studies of its kind to quantify the happiness of married, formerly married and single people at the end of their lives to find out just how much love and marriage played into overall well-being.

21-Jul-2020 7:35 PM EDT
Friends’ Drinking is Linked to Alcohol Use Among Teen and Young Adult Mothers
Research Society on Alcoholism

Friends’ drinking behaviors may be key to risky drinking among pregnant teens and young adults, according to a new study. Researchers used a previously untried approach to examine the ways that adolescents’ and young adults’ alcohol use and beliefs before they become pregnant related to their drinking as they entered into motherhood. Young mothers may be particularly vulnerable to moderate or heavy drinking during pregnancy, with adverse outcomes for their babies. Understanding the factors that influence risky alcohol use in pregnancy (3+ drinks per occasion) is important for identifying and supporting at-risk teens and young adults. The study in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research may be the first to use data collected before pregnancy, minimizing inaccurate recall.

21-Jul-2020 6:35 PM EDT
Subtypes of alcohol dependence: Predicting relapse and death following treatment
Research Society on Alcoholism

Long-term heavy drinking and alcohol dependence are linked to multiple health problems, including premature death. The risk of serious harm is higher for women than men, and also depends on the person’s current level of drinking. However, it is not known if other factors, such as previous drinking history and co-existing psychiatric conditions, might also contribute to early death in people with alcohol dependence. One way to evaluate the impact of these factors is to group patients based on clusters of characteristics and assess outcomes in each group. Alcohol dependence ‘subtypes’ have previously been used to group patients for treatment planning purposes, but have not been assessed for their role in predicting long-term outcomes of alcohol dependence. A new study, reported in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, has evaluated four alcohol dependence subtypes as predictors of relapse in the year after treatment, and as predictors of mortality over 36 years of follow-up.

Released: 22-Jul-2020 5:45 PM EDT
NRPA Applauds Congressional Passage of Great American Outdoors Act
National Recreation and Park Association

Today, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to pass the Great American Outdoors Act. The legislation will definitively fully fund the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF).

Newswise: Music therapy goes virtual in the midst of the pandemic
Released: 22-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Music therapy goes virtual in the midst of the pandemic
Arizona State University (ASU)

How one professor's quick thinking allowed music therapy to play on for clients at home

Newswise: Most comprehensive study yet of Latinx U.S. immigration agents shows economic self-interest drives decisions to join ICE
Released: 22-Jul-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Most comprehensive study yet of Latinx U.S. immigration agents shows economic self-interest drives decisions to join ICE
University of Notre Dame

Research from the University of Notre Dame found that Latinxs — regardless of their preferred national/ethnic identity, their identification with the immigrant experience or their attitude toward immigrants — choose to work in immigration for their own economic interest.

Released: 22-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Investing in the mind: Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Using data sets that only became available in recent years, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York analyzed the wage impact of cognitive skills in South Africa.

Released: 22-Jul-2020 10:50 AM EDT
AERA Announces 2020 Award Winners in Education Research
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

The American Educational Research Association (AERA) has announced the winners of its 2020 awards for excellence in education research. AERA will honor the recipients for their outstanding scholarship and service at a Virtual Awards Celebration, September 12, 3:00-4:30 p.m. EDT.

Newswise:Video Embedded why-is-it-so-hard-to-get-tested-for-covid-19
VIDEO
Released: 22-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Why Is It So Hard to Get Tested for Covid-19?
American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC)

Dr. Wiley sheds light on why testing capacity remains frustratingly limited, explaining that shortages of crucial supplies are a significant obstacle to widespread testing—and what the federal government can do to remedy this issue.

Released: 22-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
For the Public, Data Collection during COVID-19 Offers Benefits -- and Poses Hazards
Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Assistant Professor Itay Fainmesser, an economist specializing in social media and social networks, discusses the ways in which the coronavirus pandemic has affected digital communication.

Newswise: From classroom to kitchen
Released: 22-Jul-2020 8:35 AM EDT
From classroom to kitchen
West Virginia University - Eberly College of Arts and Sciences

Like many college students, Jada Taylor was unsure about which major would be best for her – until she found philosophy. Along the way, pursuing a philosophy degree has not only prepared her for her future career but helped her make important life decisions, such as choosing to become vegan and low waste.

Newswise: Which is more creative, the arts or the sciences?
Released: 22-Jul-2020 8:05 AM EDT
Which is more creative, the arts or the sciences?
University of South Australia

International expert in creativity and innovation, UniSA’s Professor David Cropley, is calling for Australian schools and universities to increase their emphasis on teaching creativity, as new research shows it is a core competency across all disciplines and critical for ensuring future job success.

Released: 22-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Even if you want to, you can’t ignore how people look or sound
Ohio State University

Can you ignore how someone looks or how they sound if you’re told it is not relevant? Probably not, at least in most cases, a new study found.

Newswise: Racial and LGBT bias persists in ridesharing drivers despite mitigation efforts, IU research finds
Released: 22-Jul-2020 6:05 AM EDT
Racial and LGBT bias persists in ridesharing drivers despite mitigation efforts, IU research finds
Indiana University

Despite efforts by ridesharing companies to eliminate or reduce discrimination, research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that racial and LGBT bias persists among drivers. Platforms such as Uber, Lyft and Via responded to drivers' biased behavior by removing information that could indicate a rider's gender and race from initial ride requests. However, researchers still found that biases against underrepresented groups and those who indicate support for the LGBT community continued to exist after drivers accepted a ride request -- when the rider's picture would then be displayed.

Released: 21-Jul-2020 7:20 PM EDT
Racial discrimination may adversely impact cognition in African Americans
Boston University School of Medicine

Experiences of racism are associated with lower subjective cognitive function (SCF) among African-American women.

Released: 21-Jul-2020 5:20 PM EDT
Front-line physicians stressed and anxious at work and home
University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

Amid the COVID-19 chaos in many hospitals, emergency medicine physicians in seven cities around the country experienced rising levels of anxiety and emotional exhaustion, regardless of the intensity of the local surge, according to a new analysis led by UC San Francisco.

Released: 21-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Family relationships impact cognitive health of older Chinese immigrants
Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University

A study by researchers at the Rutgers Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research provides new evidence of the impact of family relationships on the cognitive health of older Chinese immigrants in the United States.

Newswise: loftus.jpg?itok=RNWQUj10
Released: 21-Jul-2020 12:45 PM EDT
American Philosophical Society honors Elizabeth Loftus with Suppes Prize
University of California, Irvine

Elizabeth F. Loftus, a University of California, Irvine distinguished professor of psychological science and criminology, law and society, has been named this year’s recipient of the Suppes Prize by the American Philosophical Society. And, she is donating the $20,000 award to UCI’s School of Social Ecology, where she has been employed for 18 years.

Released: 21-Jul-2020 11:20 AM EDT
Tracking COVID-19 with a new app that assures user privacy
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

A multi-disciplinary team of Rutgers professors have developed the COVIDNearby app that allows individuals to report coronavirus symptoms with an assurance of privacy.

Released: 21-Jul-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Fears of Coronavirus Flare-ups Dampening Economic Outlook, According to Rutgers Report
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The continued spike of COVID-19 throughout the country could short-circuit New Jersey’s recovery which began to rapidly rebound in May and June, according to a new Rutgers report.

Released: 21-Jul-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Survey collection reveals over 80 years of public opinion on race
Cornell University

The Roper Center for Public Opinion Research at Cornell University has launched “Say Their Names. Hear Their Voices,” a publicly available collection of more than 80 years of public opinion surveys of Black Americans and U.S. attitudes about Black America, presented with context about race in polling over the years

Newswise: Tulane University leaders detail plans for returning to campus in fall
Released: 21-Jul-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Tulane University leaders detail plans for returning to campus in fall
Tulane University

With a full campus reopening scheduled for August 19, Tulane University is moving forward with the return of on-ground university operations and academics.

Released: 21-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Strengthening food and nutrition education research, practice and policy – The role of the federal government
Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

Leadership for the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior (SNEB) joined more than 60 organizations that stand in support of the need for greater investment and coordination in federal nutrition research and echo the call of the report, “Strengthening national nutrition research: Rationale and options for a new coordinated federal research effort and authority” (Am J Clin Nutr 2020).

Newswise: The Economic Effects of Working From Home
Released: 21-Jul-2020 9:50 AM EDT
The Economic Effects of Working From Home
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

The coronavirus pandemic has forced many companies to switch to remote work, some permanently. What does this mean for the economy?

Newswise: Resurgence of COVID-19
AUDIO
Released: 21-Jul-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Resurgence of COVID-19
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Thomas J. Bollyky, senior fellow for global health, economics, and development, and director of the Global Health Program at CFR, discusses the resurgence of COVID-19 cases and the effects of reopening economies around the world.

Newswise: Resurgence of COVID-19
AUDIO
Released: 21-Jul-2020 9:40 AM EDT
Resurgence of COVID-19
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Thomas J. Bollyky, senior fellow for global health, economics, and development, and director of the Global Health Program at CFR, discusses the resurgence of COVID-19 cases and the effects of reopening economies around the world.

Newswise:Video Embedded getting-tested-for-covid-19-after-protesting
VIDEO
Released: 21-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Getting Tested for Covid-19 After Protesting
American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC)

Medical experts support the ongoing protests against racist police killings and brutality, but experts do also worry these protests could increase coronavirus spread.

Newswise: Back to School?
Released: 21-Jul-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Back to School?
Florida Atlantic University

Dr. Terry Adirim provides answers to some of the most frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 and return to school for school-age children. Adirim is a physician executive with senior leadership and executive experience in academic medicine and the federal government. Her expertise includes pandemic planning and response, health care quality improvement and patient safety, and health policy and management.

Released: 20-Jul-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Legal marijuana may be slowing reductions in teen marijuana use, study says
University of Washington

A longitudinal study of more than 230 teens and young adults in Washington state finds that teens may be more likely to use marijuana following legalization – with the proliferation of stores and increasing adult use of the drug -- than they otherwise would have been.

Newswise: Hallowed Halls
Released: 20-Jul-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Hallowed Halls
California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

Part of the CSU’s mission is “to advance and extend knowledge, learning and culture, especially throughout California.” And, as a statewide institution, its campus museums, galleries and library collections have a unique ability to fulfill this mission by both preserving the state’s shared legacy and introducing the community to cultures, history and people from around the world. Take a look at how a few of the CSU’s varied cultural institutions are doing that.

Released: 20-Jul-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Industry Supports and Appreciates ECS Community
The Electrochemical Society

In our series, The ECS Community Adapts and Advances, Marion Jones describes the caring and concern characterizing her lockdown experience. She reports feeling supported by her North Carolina-based employer and the ECS community, allowing her to pay it forward by helping customers and caring for her family during this period of disruption.

Released: 20-Jul-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Stephanie Loveless Named New Director of Center for Deep Listening at Rensselaer
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Stephanie Loveless has been named the new director of the Center for Deep Listening at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, which stewards the philosophy and practices of sonic awareness pioneered by the late Pauline Oliveros.

Newswise: Fund to aid family advocacy initiative in UIC John Marshall Law School clinic
Released: 20-Jul-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Fund to aid family advocacy initiative in UIC John Marshall Law School clinic
University of Illinois at Chicago

Thanks to Ralla Klepak, who passed away in April 2019 at the age of 82, those in need of representation in family law matters will continue to have her advocacy via a new endowment fund formed at the University of Illinois at Chicago John Marshall Law School.

Released: 20-Jul-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Can't get off of Snapchat or Facebook? Research reveals differences between platforms
Michigan State University

Researchers from Michigan State University and California State University-Fullerton conducted the first study comparing problematic use between Facebook and Snapchat — while also uncovering surprising findings about users' personality traits.

14-Jul-2020 8:25 AM EDT
Call to action for stronger, better-funded federal nutrition research
Tufts University

A paper from research, policy, and government experts provides a compelling vision to strengthen existing federal nutrition research and improve cross-governmental coordination in order to accelerate discoveries and improve public health, food security, and population resilience. A coalition of organizations is standing in support of the paper and the need for greater investment and coordination in federal nutrition research.

Newswise: Getting Ready for the Challenge
Released: 17-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Getting Ready for the Challenge
California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

The CSU is preparing students to be effective and resilient crisis responders for the Golden State.

Newswise: 50+ and Healthy: Loyola Psychiatrist Authors New Book on Mental Health and Aging
Released: 17-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
50+ and Healthy: Loyola Psychiatrist Authors New Book on Mental Health and Aging
Loyola Medicine

A new book by Loyola Medicine psychiatrist Murali Rao, MD, provides a road map for understanding and preventing depression and other mental illness as we age, and when and how to seek help, when necessary.

Newswise: NRPA Celebrates Park and Recreation Professionals Day, July 17, 2020
Released: 17-Jul-2020 11:15 AM EDT
NRPA Celebrates Park and Recreation Professionals Day, July 17, 2020
National Recreation and Park Association

NRPA is proud to recognize July 17, 2020, as national Park and Recreation Professionals Day. This special day honors park and recreation professionals nationwide who work tirelessly to build strong, healthy and resilient communities through the essential programs and services they provide.


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