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Showing results 4012140130 of 40238
  • Embargo expired:
    4-Feb-1998 12:00 AM EST

Article ID: 6180

More Education, More Headaches

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Women get more tension headaches than men and people with advanced degrees suffer more often from tension headaches than the less educated, according to a recent study of tension headache prevalence conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health.

Released:
4-Feb-1998 12:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 6223

It doesn't add up: First study of talented youg mathematicians shows boys out-perform girls

University of Washington

In the first long-term study of mathematically precocious young children, University of Washington researchers have found significantly more boys than girls with very high levels of math talents, and discovered that even when children are given an enrichment program math-talented girls don't catch up with boys in the first two years of school.

Released:
3-Feb-1998 12:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 6215

Sex Scandals and the White House: Why the American Public Has Been So Obsessed With Presidential Sex Scandals

Vassar College

"Throughout U.S. history, when ever such affairs have surfaced, Democrats have been the alleged malefactors," says Rebecca B. Edwards, Ph.D., associate professor of history at Vassar College. "This has less to do with the individuals involved than with the larger patterns of partisan beliefs."

Released:
31-Jan-1998 12:00 AM EST

Pop Culture

Article ID: 6213

Vanderbilt study finds female prisoners protrayed as "moral keepers"

Vanderbilt University

The mass media's depiction of female prisoners as family-centered and easily reformed is driving the national concern over the Karla Faye Tucker case, according to John Sloop, an expert in television critism and mass media theory at Vanderbilt University.

Released:
31-Jan-1998 12:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 6208

How do I love thee? Instead of counting the ways, 'The Love Test' offers couples 32 scientific quizzes to measure their relationship

University of Washington

If Paul Simon had been a social scientist instead of a song writer he might have stopped counting those "50 Ways to Leave Your Lover" and focused on finding ways to keep his lover around. The result might have been like "The Love Test," a new book filled with 32 romance and relationship-oriented quizzes that has been compiled by two University of Washington sociologists.

Released:
31-Jan-1998 12:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 6206

Vanderbilt University Sociologist Studies "Flower Power"

Vanderbilt University

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Where have all the "flower children" gone and how have they fared?

Released:
31-Jan-1998 12:00 AM EST

Pop Culture

Article ID: 6205

Vanderbilt educator says smaller classes bring major expense, modest gains

Vanderbilt University

A Vanderbilt University education professor who has studied the impact of class size on students' learning says a comprehensive plan to improve skills would be a better investment of the nation's resources.

Released:
31-Jan-1998 12:00 AM EST

Education

Article ID: 6204

University of Arizona professor's research shows root motivation for killing may be same for murders and executions

University of Arizona

New research relates executions to parental models of care and compassion, says a psychology professor at The University of Arizona in Tucson. Following the release earlier this week of a study on clemency issues surrounding capital murder cases, Professor Gary Schwartz says he has found evidence that correlates public willingness to execute certain condemned prisoners as a function of personal and parental justice and compassion.

Released:
31-Jan-1998 12:00 AM EST

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 6191

Dean On Homework: How Much And How Meaningful?

Purdue University

When it comes to homework, quantity does not always equal quality. Dean of Purdue University's School of Education says for young children, 20 minutes to an hour three to four times a week is just about right for homework. Older students in middle school and high school can profit from meaningful assignments in the one- to two-hour range. But Haring stresses that all homework should be meaningful to the child.

Released:
30-Jan-1998 12:00 AM EST

Education

Article ID: 6189

Care of the Wild: Veterinary Work Isn't Just for the Dogs These Days

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Dogs and cats still dominate the patient list at University of Wisconsin-Madison's School of Veterinary Medicine, but they're sharing more space with a new breed of companion critters, from ailing ferrets to sick lizards.

Released:
30-Jan-1998 12:00 AM EST

Education


Showing results 4012140130 of 40238

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