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  • Embargo expired:
    24-Apr-2019 4:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 711647

Spinal Muscular Atrophy Drug May Help Kids With Later-Onset Disease

American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

There is now further evidence that a drug that is effective in treating the rare muscle-wasting disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) early in life may be associated with improvement in older children, according to a study published in the April 24, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Released:
19-Apr-2019 5:05 PM EDT
Embargo will expire:
1-May-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
24-Apr-2019 2:55 PM EDT

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 711870

Researchers learn how ‘bad cholesterol’ enters artery walls in condition linked to world’s No. 1 killer

UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers have determined how circulating “bad cholesterol” enters artery walls to cause the plaque that narrows the blood vessels and leads to heart attacks and strokes.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 2:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711872

News Alert: Scientists on cusp of solving genetic diseases by snipping defective DNA

UT Southwestern Medical Center

Advancements in gene editing, buoyed by the discovery of CRISPR technology that enables precise editing of the human genome, have put scientists on the cusp of solving some of mankind’s most devastating and baffling disorders. Among them is Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a muscle-withering disease that UT Southwestern geneticists have halted in animals and human cells through a single-cut gene-editing technique. The next major step: a clinical trial that could change the prognosis for the most common fatal genetic disease in children and perhaps set the stage to treat other deadly diseases.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711868

Blood Thinner Found to Significantly Reduce Subsequent Heart Failure Risks

University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found using blood thinners in patients with worsening heart failure, coronary artery disease and irregular heart rhythms was associated with a reduced risk of thromboembolic events, such as stroke and heart attack.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711817

Studying Cell Lineage in Tumors Reveals Targetable Vulnerabilities

Ludwig Cancer Research

To explain a person’s actions in the present, it sometimes helps to understand their past, including where they come from and how they were raised. This is also true of tumors. Delving into a tumor’s cellular lineage, a Ludwig Cancer Research study shows, can reveal weaknesses to target for customized therapies.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 1:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711866

Chemotherapy or not?

Case Western Reserve University

Case Western Reserve University researchers and partners, including a collaborator at Cleveland Clinic, are pushing the boundaries of how “smart” diagnostic-imaging machines identify cancers—and uncovering clues outside the tumor to tell whether a patient will respond well to chemotherapy.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711865

'Super-Hero' Stem Cells Survive Radiation to Regrow Muscles

UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

UC San Francisco researchers have discovered a new type of stem cell in mouse muscles that is resistant to radiation and other forms of cellular stress. The findings have implications for improving recovery for cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and could even lead to treatments to protect future astronauts from the ravages of deep-space radiation.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 711867

Newly discovered Ebolavirus may not cause severe disease in humans

University of Kent

Researchers from the University of Kent's School of Biosciences have provided evidence that a newly discovered Ebolavirus may not be as deadly as other species to humans.

Released:
24-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Embargo will expire:
26-Apr-2019 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
24-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT

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