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Article ID: 717786

Speed identified as the best predictor of car crashes

University of Waterloo

Speeding is the riskiest kind of aggressive driving, according to a unique analysis of data from on-board devices in vehicles.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Where Are New Stars Born? NASA's Webb Telescope Will Investigate

Article ID: 717658

Where Are New Stars Born? NASA's Webb Telescope Will Investigate

Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Though our Milky Way galaxy continues to churn out the equivalent of one Sun every year, in the past, that rate was up to one hundred times greater. To understand how stars like our Sun formed, we need to look back billions of years into the past. The Webb telescope will act as a time machine to peer back into the early universe. To look back even further, astronomers will also take advantage of natural, cosmic telescopes called gravitational lenses, which magnify the light from distant galaxies that are at or near the peak of star formation. The effect allows researchers to study the details of early galaxies too far away to be seen with even the most powerful telescopes alone.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 10:00 AM EDT

Channels:

Physics, Space and Astronomy

Languages:

English

Newswise: New way to make micro-sensors may revolutionize future of electronics

Article ID: 717780

New way to make micro-sensors may revolutionize future of electronics

Binghamton University, State University of New York

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York researchers have found a way to improve the performance of tiny sensors that could have wide-reaching implications for electronic devices we use every day.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 9:40 AM EDT
Newswise: Engineers make transistors and electronic devices entirely from thread

Article ID: 717763

Engineers make transistors and electronic devices entirely from thread

Tufts University

A team of Tufts University engineers has developed a transistor made from linen thread, enabling them to create electronic devices made entirely of thin threads that could be woven into fabric, worn on the skin, or even (theoretically) implanted surgically for diagnostic monitoring.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 8:50 AM EDT
Newswise: Mosquitoes push northern limits with time-capsule eggs to survive winters

Article ID: 717772

Mosquitoes push northern limits with time-capsule eggs to survive winters

Washington University in St. Louis

Invasive mosquitoes at the northern limit of their current range are surviving conditions that are colder than those in their native territory. This new evidence of rapid local adaptation could have implications for efforts to control the spread of this invasive species.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 7:05 AM EDT
Newswise: UF/IFAS Researchers Close in on a Tastier Tomato

Article ID: 717773

UF/IFAS Researchers Close in on a Tastier Tomato

University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

In their quest for a tastier tomato, University of Florida scientists are finding traits they believe will tempt consumers with flavor that triggers their senses even more. They’re making significant progress on improving the UF-developed Tasti-Lee™ tomato – and it will feature improved flavor and aroma.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 7:05 AM EDT
Newswise: ‘Quantum Annealer’ Shows Promise in New Study

Article ID: 717725

‘Quantum Annealer’ Shows Promise in New Study

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

An international team of researchers has developed a new algorithm for solving equations using a type of quantum computer called a “quantum annealer.” The team systematically examined how this method scales when facing increasingly difficult mathematical equations, with promising results.

Released:
21-Aug-2019 6:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Repeated Semen Exposure Promotes Host Resistance to Infection in Preclinical Model of HIV
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Aug-2019 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 717752

Repeated Semen Exposure Promotes Host Resistance to Infection in Preclinical Model of HIV

Wistar Institute

Contrary to the long-held view that semen can only act as a way to transmit HIV-1 from men to women, scientists at The Wistar Institute and the University of Puerto Rico found that frequent and sustained semen exposure can change the characteristics of the circulating and vaginal tissue immune cells that are targets for infection, reducing the susceptibility to a future infection.

Released:
20-Aug-2019 4:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 717796

ECP’s Exastar Project Seeks Answers Hidden in the Cosmos

Department of Energy, Office of Science

ExaStar aims to create simulations for comparison with experiments and observations to help answer a variety of questions: Why is there more iron than gold in the universe? Why is anything rarer than anything else? Why is finding transuranic elements on the face of the earth difficult?

Released:
21-Aug-2019 12:05 AM EDT

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