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Article ID: 714623

Scaffold Helps Cells Repair Torn Meniscus in Lab Tests

Duke Health

About a million times a year, Americans with a torn meniscus get surgery, but certain tears don't heal well. Duke scientists have developed a scaffold from a pig’s meniscus that performed better in lab tests than healing without a scaffold.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Embargo will expire:
24-Jun-2019 3:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
19-Jun-2019 1:05 PM EDT

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Article ID: 714618

In Making Treatment Decisions, American Women Prefer More Involvement than American Men

Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins

Ethnic group and gender both influence patients’ experiences with treatment decision-making but in different ways, according to new research led by Henry S. Perkins, MD, of the University of Texas Health Science Center and the Ecumenical Center for Religion and Health in San Antonio, Texas. That conclusion appears in an article in the July issue of Medical Care, published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 714613

New Platform Flips Traditional On-Demand Supply Chain Approach on its Head

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Research recently published in Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, by systems engineers at Rensselaer, demonstrated how a hierarchical model that provides suppliers with a certain amount of choice could improve supply and demand matching for underutilized resources—and may even transform what’s become known as the sharing economy.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Embargo will expire:
24-Jun-2019 12:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
19-Jun-2019 1:00 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Jun-2019 12:00 AM EDT

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Newswise: Studying Diverse Populations Can Boost Genetic Discovery, Curb Health Disparities

Article ID: 714520

Studying Diverse Populations Can Boost Genetic Discovery, Curb Health Disparities

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Studying diverse, multi-ethnic populations can increase genetic discoveries and reduce health disparities, according to one of the largest genetic studies of Hispanics and Latinos, African-Americans, Asians and other minorities. The study by Rutgers and other institutions, published in the journal Nature, looked at genetic variants, or mutations, in nearly 50,000 people of non-European descent.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Newswise: Successful ‘alien’ bird invasions are location dependent
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 714610

Successful ‘alien’ bird invasions are location dependent

University of Utah

A new study published today in Nature, shows that alien bird introductions are most successful in locations and climates similar to their native habitats and in places where other alien species are already established. The discovery is important for understanding the processes that help or hinder species moving between locations, and the next steps for predicting and limiting the threat of future biological invasions.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 714465

New Study Highlights Need for Ethnic and Ancestral Diversity in Genomic Research

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

A new multicenter analysis led by researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and other institutions found the inclusion of diverse, multiethnic populations in large-scale genomic studies is critical for reducing health disparities and accurately representing genetics-related disease risks in all populations. The results appear in the June 19 issue of the journal Nature.

Released:
17-Jun-2019 1:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 714620

Borrowing from Astronomy to Rob the Twinkle from Brain Imagery

University of California San Diego

UC San Diego Professor David Kleinfeld and postdoctoral fellow Rui Liu adopted adaptive optics (AO) to correct microscopic images for the scattering of light that occurs in brain tissue. The result was the first-ever recording of the subcellular neuronal inputs and outputs within the cortical mantle in mice.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT

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