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GODDESS detector sees the origins of elements

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Nuclear physicists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have created the GODDESS detector to provide insight into astrophysical nuclear reactions that produce elements heavier than hydrogen.

Channels: All Journal News, Nuclear Physics, Particle Physics, Physics, DOE Science News,

Released:
17-Dec-2019 12:50 PM EST
Released:
17-Dec-2019 10:15 AM EST
Feature

Slime Santa beard likes hot peppers

University of Warwick

A slime Santa beard has been made by Ian Hands-Portman at the University of Warwick using slime molds, a myxomycete which is a single giant cell with multiple nuclei that lives in dark damp places and likes to feed off bacteria and fungi and things that have started to decay.

Channels: Cell Biology, Technology, Environmental Science, Staff Picks,

Released:
17-Dec-2019 7:05 AM EST
Video-Only
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Dec-2019 9:00 AM EST

Iowa State student balances school, children, journalism in pursuit of passion

Iowa State University

Manichanh Naonady is a mother, journalist, non-traditional student and so much more. She’ll soon have another identity: college graduate. She graduates from Iowa State University this weekend with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and mass communication and a newfound passion for food journalism.

Channels: All Journal News, Education, Media and Journalism,

Released:
13-Dec-2019 4:50 PM EST
Feature

Education

  • Embargo expired:
    16-Dec-2019 9:00 AM EST

Fascination with flying: Refugee camp math whiz turns into Iowa State aerospace engineering all-star

Iowa State University

The Rwandan genocide forced Kwizera Imani and his family to spend nine years in a refugee camp. There, Imani fell in love with school, math in particular. Imani is now a senior in aerospace engineering at Iowa State University, and he’s graduating this weekend with five internships under his belt and a new adventure: a job at Collins Aerospace.

Channels: All Journal News, Aviation and Aeronautics, Education, Engineering, Mathematics,

Released:
13-Dec-2019 4:50 PM EST
Feature

Education

Barrels of ancient Antarctic air aim to track history of rare gas

University of Washington

An Antarctic field campaign last winter led by the U.S. and Australia has successfully extracted some of the largest samples of air dating from the 1870s until today. Researchers will use the samples to look for changes in the molecules that scrub the atmosphere of methane and other gases.

Channels: Climate Science, Environmental Science,

Released:
12-Dec-2019 5:05 PM EST
Feature

Watch on Live Camera As a Baby Albatross Grows Up

Cornell University

Millions of people from around the world can now witness a rare sight in real time: a Northern Royal Albatross pair nesting and raising their chick. The live views originate from a coastal albatross colony in Otago, on South Island, New Zealand, and are made possible by a new partnership between the country's Department of Conservation (DOC) and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Channels: All Journal News, Birds, Education,

Released:
12-Dec-2019 4:45 PM EST
Feature

Education

Released:
12-Dec-2019 4:30 PM EST
Feature

A Galactic Dance

NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory

Galaxies lead a graceful existence on cosmic timescales. Over millions of years, they can engage in elaborate dances that produce some of Nature’s most exquisite and striking grand designs. Few are as captivating as the galactic duo known as NGC 5394/5, sometimes nicknamed the Heron Galaxy. This image, obtained by the Gemini Observatory of NSF’s National Optical-Infrared Astronomy Research Laboratory, captures a snapshot of this compelling interacting pair.

Channels: Space and Astronomy, Nature, Space and Astronomy,

Released:
12-Dec-2019 3:05 PM EST
Research Results

Why It Matters: Space Jam

Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

Space is getting crowded. The biggest challenge is space junk—the debris that results when satellites break up or get shot down. If we aren’t careful, space junk, and space conflict, could cause a lot of problems down here on Earth.

Channels: Engineering, Space and Astronomy, Technology, International Law, U.S. Foreign Relations, U.S. National Security,

Released:
10-Dec-2019 3:15 PM EST
Feature

Law and Public Policy



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