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Released: 6-Jul-2020 4:50 PM EDT
COVID-19 demonstrates why wealth matters
Washington University in St. Louis

While COVID-19 has impacted all individuals, the impact has not been equal. In a new national Socioeconomic Impact of COVID-19 survey, the Social Policy Institute at Washington University in St. Louis found that liquid assets increased the likelihood that an individual could practice social distancing. However, Black individuals were least likely to afford social distancing.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT
White Police Officers Use Force More Often Than Non-White Colleagues
Texas A&M University

White police officers are far more likely to use force than their nonwhite counterparts, especially in minority neighborhoods, according to a study from Texas A&M University researchers.

Newswise: Tulane professor’s book goes back in time to examine Hurricane Katrina
Released: 6-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Tulane professor’s book goes back in time to examine Hurricane Katrina
Tulane University

Andy Horowitz, a Tulane scholar who studies the history of disasters, says a 1915 hurricane and its consequences are linked to Katrina and is one of the many factors that informed his writing “Katrina: A History, 1915-2015” (Harvard University Press).

Released: 6-Jul-2020 2:10 PM EDT
What If People Use Autonomous Vehicles To Do Bad Things?
North Carolina State University

There’s a fairly large flaw in the way that programmers are currently addressing ethical concerns related to artificial intelligence and autonomous vehicles (AVs). Namely, existing approaches don’t account for the fact that people might try to use the AVs to do something bad.

Newswise: What Is the World Doing to Create a COVID-19 Vaccine?
Released: 6-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
What Is the World Doing to Create a COVID-19 Vaccine?
Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)

The race to find a vaccine for the new coronavirus is well underway. Governments and researchers are aiming to provide billions of people with immunity in eighteen months or less, which would be unprecedented.

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Released: 6-Jul-2020 12:15 PM EDT
Owner behavior affects effort and accuracy in dogs' communications
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Human communication has evolved mechanisms that can be observed across all cultures and languages, including the use of communication history and the principle of least effort

Released: 6-Jul-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Premier nutrition education conference offers free registration for media
Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior

The Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior is offering members of the media free registration to its 53rd Annual Conference “What Food Future?” held entirely online from July 20 – 24.

3-Jul-2020 9:55 AM EDT
Nitrogen Pollution Policies Around the World Lag Behind Scientific Knowledge, New Analysis Finds
New York University

National and regional policies aimed at addressing pollution fueled by nitrogen lag behind scientific knowledge of the problem, finds a new analysis by an international team of researchers.

Newswise: Criminal justice professor fights for prisoners' families
Released: 6-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Criminal justice professor fights for prisoners' families
Wichita State University

The odds of Breanna Boppre ending up in the correctional system were astronomically higher than the odds of her becoming Dr. Breanna Boppre, assistant professor of criminal justice at Wichita State University.

Released: 6-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Future Teachers More Likely to View Black Children as Angry, Even When They Are Not
North Carolina State University

A study of prospective teachers finds they are more likely to interpret the facial expressions of Black boys and girls as being angry, even when they are not. This is significantly different than how the prospective teachers interpreted the facial expressions of white children.

30-Jun-2020 8:50 AM EDT
Cutting Down But Not Out: Very-Heavy Drinkers Needn’t Quit Completely for Cardiovascular Benefit
Research Society on Alcoholism

High-risk drinkers who substantially reduce their alcohol use can lower their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) despite not completely abstaining, according to study findings published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. CVD encompasses a range of conditions involving the heart or blood vessels, and is the leading cause of death in the US. It is also one of many negative health outcomes associated with heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Reductions in drinking can be defined using World Health Organization (WHO) ‘risk drinking levels’, which classify drinkers into ‘very high’, ‘high’, ‘moderate’ and ‘low’ risk categories based on their average daily alcohol consumption. Previous research has shown that a reduction of two or more levels (for example, from ‘very high’ to ‘moderate’) can lower the risk of multiple health issues, but did not assess the impact on CVD specifically. The latest study has examined associations between reductions in WHO risk drinking

Newswise: UC San Diego Receives $1.6 Million to Better Prepare Young Adults for Engineering and Technical Careers
Released: 2-Jul-2020 7:45 PM EDT
UC San Diego Receives $1.6 Million to Better Prepare Young Adults for Engineering and Technical Careers
University of California San Diego

Longtime University of California San Diego supporter Buzz Woolley has pledged $1.6 million over the next three years to fund an innovative new initiative that will significantly expand the region’s engineering and technical workforce.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 3:15 PM EDT
UA Little Rock’s new flexible MBA program offers best of online, face-to-face classes
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock is offering Master of Business Administration (MBA) students the opportunity to embrace the best of on-campus and online learning through a new flexible MBA program.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Study: Crowdsourced Data Could Help Map Urban Food Deserts
University of Texas at Dallas

New research from The University of Texas at Dallas suggests food deserts might be more prevalent in the U.S. than the numbers reported in government estimates.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Collectivism drives efforts to reduce the spread of COVID-19
University of Kent

Research from the University of Kent has found that people who adopt a collectivist mindset are more likely to comply with social distancing and hygiene practices to help reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland State University Receive $1.2 Million NIH Award to Recruit Underrepresented Minority Ph.D. Students
Cleveland Clinic

At a time when the national conversation is focused on narrowing the gap of racial equity, two of Cleveland’s anchor institutions have been awarded grant funding that will help them turn words into action. Cleveland State University and Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute received a five-year, $1.2 million T32 training award from the National Institutes of Health to recruit underrepresented minority Ph.D. students and students underrepresented in the science and technology workforce.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 10:15 AM EDT
Stemming the Spread of Misinformation on Social Media
Association for Psychological Science

New research reported in the journal Psychological Science finds that priming people to think about accuracy could make them more discerning in what they subsequently share on social media.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Gender gaps in STEM college majors emerge in high school
Cornell University

Although studies have shown that women are more likely than men to enter and complete college in U.S. higher education, women are less likely to earn degrees in science, technology, engineering and math fields. In new research, Kim Weeden, the Jan Rock Zubrow ’77 Professor of the Social Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences at Cornell University, traces the discrepancy in college majors back to gender differences that emerge early in high school.

Released: 2-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Prospective teachers misperceive Black children as angry
American Psychological Association (APA)

Prospective teachers appear more likely to misperceive Black children as angry than white children, which may undermine the education of Black youth, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

Newswise: Mothering in domestic violence: protecting children behind closed doors
Released: 2-Jul-2020 7:05 AM EDT
Mothering in domestic violence: protecting children behind closed doors
University of South Australia

As emerging data shows an alarming rise of domestic violence during the pandemic, researchers at the University of South Australia are urging practitioners to look beyond clinical observations and focus on the strengths that mothers exercise to protect their children from domestic abuse.

29-Jun-2020 7:10 AM EDT
Men More Likely than Women to be Seen as Brilliant
New York University

Men are more likely than are women to be seen as “brilliant,” finds a new study measuring global perceptions linked to gender. The work concludes that these stereotyped views are an instance of implicit bias, revealing automatic associations that people cannot, or at least do not, report holding when asked directly.

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Released: 1-Jul-2020 2:45 PM EDT
How to bring conservation messaging into wildlife-based tourism
University of Helsinki

The study states that failing to encourage tourists to do more on behalf of wildlife represents a missed opportunity for conservation.

Newswise: Career Fast Track: Preparing Graduates for the Job Next Door
Released: 1-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Career Fast Track: Preparing Graduates for the Job Next Door
California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

By working with local industries, CSU campuses are ensuring their graduates are ready to enter careers and drive innovation in these regional sectors.

Newswise: UIC Business announces the Stuart Handler Department of Real Estate
Released: 1-Jul-2020 1:25 PM EDT
UIC Business announces the Stuart Handler Department of Real Estate
University of Illinois at Chicago

The Stuart Handler Department of Real Estate joins the accounting, finance, information and decision sciences and managerial studies departments in serving the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Business Administration’s more than 3,000 undergraduate and 800 graduate students.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 11:10 AM EDT
Little Rock Congregations Study shows more clergy are concerned about race relations
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Research from the Little Rock Congregations Study at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock shows that religious leaders in Little Rock are growing more concerned with the issue of race relations.

Newswise: UIC and UIS announce guaranteed pathway for undergraduates to earn UIC nursing degree
Released: 1-Jul-2020 10:35 AM EDT
UIC and UIS announce guaranteed pathway for undergraduates to earn UIC nursing degree
University of Illinois at Chicago

Under the program, first-time freshmen will have a guaranteed place in the UIC College of Nursing BSN program

Newswise: ISU Police hope to lead by example in community policing efforts
Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:45 AM EDT
ISU Police hope to lead by example in community policing efforts
Iowa State University

The Iowa State University Police Department wants to serve as an example for other law enforcement agencies to see how acknowledging and working to change problems within the profession can turn into positive change in their communities. The department’s Engagement and Inclusion Officer Team is being recognized for its work in this area.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Spanish language increasingly more relevant to presidential elections
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Discourse in and about Spanish was present on both sides of the political spectrum, more so leading up to the 2016 presidential election than in previous cycles, according to research conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Released: 1-Jul-2020 8:00 AM EDT
School absenteeism has surprising consequences for adults
Ohio State University

Kids who miss a lot of school from kindergarten to eighth grade may suffer unexpected costs as young adults, a new study finds. Researchers found that those who were more regularly absent in these early years of school were less likely to vote and reported more economic difficulties when they were 22-23 years old.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 11:05 PM EDT
NUS Asia Research Institute launches Asian Peace Programme
National University of Singapore

Today, the Asia Research Institute (ARI) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) announced the launch of the Asian Peace Programme (APP), to initiate and support policy research that will work towards generating an enduring peace in Asia.

Newswise: Springer Named Director of UA Little Rock Emerging Analytics Center
Released: 30-Jun-2020 5:00 PM EDT
Springer Named Director of UA Little Rock Emerging Analytics Center
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Dr. Jan P. Springer, associate professor in the Department of Computer Science, has been named the new director of the George W. Donaghey Emerging Analytics Center at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.The Emerging Analytics Center (EAC) is a research center that is home to an energetic group of researchers, faculty, and students performing innovative research and development in technology, infrastructure, and applications for virtual and augmented realities, immersive visualization, interactive technologies, as well as cybersecurity and the Internet of Things.

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Released: 30-Jun-2020 3:40 PM EDT
Brown School’s Race and Opportunity Lab recommends specific policing reforms
Washington University in St. Louis

As the nation struggles with police violence, a new report from HomeGrown StL in the Race and Opportunity Lab at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis recommends reforms to build an equitable, transparent and accountable public safety approach that will include lawsuit liability, a police misconduct database and federal funding mandates.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Saint Louis University and Access Academies Partner to Propel At-Risk Youth to Academic, Career Success
Saint Louis University

Access Academies, a leading local nonprofit that propels at-risk students from middle school to college and career success, and Saint Louis University will join forces in an innovative partnership aimed at expanding educational opportunities for hundreds of students across St. Louis.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Even when women outnumber men, gender bias persists among science undergrads
Colorado State University

Increasing gender diversity has been a long-sought goal across many of the sciences, and interventions and programs to attract more women into fields like physics and math often happen at the undergraduate level.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:35 AM EDT
Nearly half of US youth have been stalked/harassed by partners
Boston University School of Medicine

A new, first-of-its-kind Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study finds that 48% of 12-18-year-olds who have been in a relationship have been stalked or harassed by a partner, and 42% have stalked or harassed a partner.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:25 AM EDT
Older adults share fewer memories as they age
University of Arizona

By the time people reach a certain age, they've accumulated enough life experience to have plenty of stories to tell about life "back in their day."

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Study: New leaders emerge as organizations go to virtual work spaces
Brigham Young University

When work meetings shifted online this spring, some may have noticed new standouts among their colleagues. According to new research, members of virtual teams identify leaders in significantly different ways compared to members of in-person teams.

Released: 30-Jun-2020 10:10 AM EDT
The price of taking a stance: How corporate sociopolitical activism impacts bottom line
University of Arizona

As the political climate in the United States becomes increasingly charged, some businesses are looking to have their voices heard on controversial issues.

Released: 29-Jun-2020 7:05 PM EDT
CSU Faculty Continue to Enhance Virtual Instruction
California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

​​​On May 12, 2020, California State University Chancellor Timothy P. White shared information that would shape higher education across the state: To safeguard the health and safety of the CSU's 482,000 students, 53,000 employees and countless visitors, the great majority of instruction would be delivered virtually for the fall 2020 term. In preparation for vibrant virtual fall learning, faculty across the CSU's 23 campuses are engaging in a variety of professional development programs to strengthen their online instruction skills and build a community of fellow faculty learners.

Newswise: Ancient Maya Reservoirs Contained Toxic Pollution
Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Ancient Maya Reservoirs Contained Toxic Pollution
University of Cincinnati

Mercury, algae made water undrinkable in heart of city


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