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Article ID: 536760

Can Your Brain Control Your Blood Pressure?

University of Kentucky

A landmark trial is underway to test whether an implant can stimulate the brain to lower blood pressure when medicine has failed. Early indications are very encouraging.

Released:
11-Jan-2008 1:00 PM EST

Article ID: 536864

Pepper Center to Host World Leaders at International Conference

Florida State University

World leaders from Africa and the Middle East will gather at Florida State University for a first-of-its-kind intercultural dialogue designed to support a United Nations initiative, the Alliance of Civilizations.

Released:
11-Jan-2008 11:00 AM EST

Law and Public Policy

Article ID: 536798

Overactive Nerves May Account for "Ringing in the Ears"

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Tinnitus can result when touch-sensing neurons on the head and neck fill a void in the brain after hearing damage, a study in animals shows. The results suggest acupuncture and trigger point therapy may be effective treatments.

Released:
10-Jan-2008 11:20 AM EST

Research Results

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  • Embargo expired:
    9-Jan-2008 3:00 PM EST

Article ID: 536668

Study Shows Link Between TCE Exposure, Parkinsonism

University of Kentucky

A number of industrial workers who exhibited symptoms of parkinsonism, a group of nervous disorders with symptoms similar to Parkinson's disease, had experienced long-term exposure to TCE, a degreasing agent widely used in industry.

Released:
7-Jan-2008 2:00 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    8-Jan-2008 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 536676

Hubble Finds That 'Blue Blobs' in Space Are Orphaned Clusters of Stars

Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

Hubble Space Telescope's powerful vision has resolved strange objects nicknamed "blue blobs" and found them to be brilliant blue clusters of stars born in the swirls and eddies of a galactic smashup 200 million years ago. Such "blue blobs"--weighing tens of thousands of solar masses--have never been seen in detail before in such sparse locations.

Released:
8-Jan-2008 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 536684

Pig Islet Cells: The Solution for Diabetes?

MicroIslet

Transplantation of insulin-producing islet cells from human donors or cadavers, an investigational approach to long-term diabetes treatment, is fraught with difficulties. San Diego-based MicroIslet, Inc. believes that transplantation of encapsulated islets from pigs may be the answer.

Released:
8-Jan-2008 7:00 AM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    8-Jan-2008 12:05 AM EST

Article ID: 536624

Study Proves the Co-pay Connection in Chronic Disease

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

As 2008 begins, millions of Americans are facing higher insurance co-pays for drugs and doctor appointments. But a new study finds that instead of going up, co-pays should go down "“ at least for some people taking some drugs. For people with chronic diseases, a few dollars can make all the difference when deciding to buy key preventive medicines.

Released:
4-Jan-2008 8:50 AM EST

Article ID: 536491

Tips to Get Into Shape without Leaving the House

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Don't have the time or money to sign up for a gym membership? That shouldn't keep you from making a New Year's resolution to get fit. U-M Health System fitness experts say you don't have to join a gym to develop a sustainable fitness regimen. With the right equipment and motivation, you can start an exercise program at home that will last.

Released:
31-Dec-2007 8:00 AM EST

Article ID: 536490

Bring in the New Year with a New Fitness Routine

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Joining a gym is easy. What's hard is sticking with an exercise routine for more than a few weeks into the new year. To start and stick with a new workout plan through 2008, a University of Michigan Health System fitness expert offers advice for setting reasonable fitness goals, and staying motivated at the gym.

Released:
31-Dec-2007 8:00 AM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    3-Jan-2008 12:05 AM EST

Article ID: 536553

Catheter Chaos: Hospitals Lag in Preventing Common Infection

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Right now, one in four hospitalized Americans has a urinary catheter. But despite the fact that catheter-related urinary tract infections are the most common hospital-acquired infection, and can lead to dangerous complications, a new study shows hospitals aren't using proven tactics to prevent such problems.

Released:
30-Dec-2007 1:00 PM EST

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