Meatless Monday Introduces the Plant Protein Power Campaign

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Experts Answer the Question: Can I Get a Full Day's Protein without Eating Meat?


One of the most common concerns in practicing Meatless Monday is whether or not you're getting enough protein. In a recent online survey conducted by the Data Decisions Group1, 52 percent of the participants agreed that getting enough protein was one of the biggest challenges in cutting back on meat.

To address this issue, Meatless Monday teamed up with the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future at the Bloomberg School of Public Health to create the "Plant Protein Power" educational campaign. Master of Public Health and Registered Dietitian Becky Ramsing, who serves as the Meatless Monday adviser at the Center said, “You definitely don’t need meat at every meal. Beans, nuts, fruits and vegetables can provide ample amounts of quality protein.”

Research shows that substituting protein from red and processed meats with plant protein reduces the risk of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer.2 In addition, adding more plant-based foods to your diet helps conserve natural resources and lowers greenhouse gas emissions.3

The Meatless Monday Plant Protein Power campaign includes informative posters, social media graphics, animated GIF visuals and a list of frequently asked questions. It also contains a variety of meatless meal suggestions that fulfill the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for protein. The kit's contents can be used by organizations like hospitals, schools and companies as part of their wellness programs. Individuals looking for new ways to incorporate more plant-based protein into their diet can also benefit from this free downloadable kit

Surprising Plant Protein Facts:

  • Most Americans eat 1 1/2 times more protein than they need each day.4
  • The quality of plant-based protein is just as good as meat protein.5
  • Plant-based meals can be quite filling, especially when made with beans, which are rich in fiber.6
  • Plant-based foods naturally form complete protein from a variety of popular ingredients.7
  • Plant-based protein helps athletes perform at their best8, including Tom Brady, Derrick Morgan, Wilson Chandler and Venus Williams.

Meatless Monday was founded in 2003 by Sid Lerner and Johns Hopkins to provide an easy way for people to reduce meat in their diet for their health and the health of the planet. This initiative is now active in over 40 countries and is practiced by schools, hospitals, restaurants, celebrities and whole communities.

Meatless Monday is an initiative of The Monday Campaigns, a public health initiative in association with The Lerner Centers for Public Health Promotion at Johns Hopkins, Columbia and Syracuse Universities. The campaign offers science-based weekly tips, recipes and other inspiration to help people start the week off healthy. Wellness organizations can also download free resources to start their own Healthy Monday programs.

To learn more, visit: www.mondaycampaigns.org

 

Contact:

Cherry Dumaual

The Monday Campaigns

PR & Partnerships Director

cdumaual@mondaycampaigns.org

1.212.991.1056

 

References:

 

  1. Data Decisions Group, 2017. Over 1,000 nationally representative participants

 

  1. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2016 Dec;116(12):1970-1980. doi: 10.1016/j.jand.2016.09.025.

 

  1. Gerber PJ, Steinfeld H, Henderson B, et al. Tackling Climate Change through Livestock – A Global Assessment of Emissions and Mitigation Opportunities. Rome: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; 2013.

 

  1. What We Eat in America, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010.

 

  1. https://www.jhsph.edu/research/centers-and-institutes/johns-hopkins-center-for-a-livable-future/_pdf/projects/HM/WhatDoesLessMeatLookLike_20March2017March1.pdf

 

  1. Li SS, Kendall CW, de Souza RJ, Jayalath VH, Cozma AI, Ha V, Mirrahimi A, Chiavaroli L, Augustin LS, Blanco Mejia S, Leiter LA, Beyene J, Jenkins DJ, Sievenpiper JL. Dietary pulses, satiety and food intake: a systematic review and meta-analysis of acute feeding trials. Obesity, 2014. Aug;22(8):1773-80.

 

  1. American Dietetic Association, supported research, 2009.

 

  1. Nutrients 2016, 8, 726; doi:10.3390/nu8110726.

 

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