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  • Alfalfa roots secrete chemical signals into soil to attract and recruit bacteria. These bacteria live in a plant's roots and provide a natural fertilizer source. Pictured is an alfalfa root with root hairs that have attracted rhizobia soil bacteria, which are engineered to appear in green fluorescence for easier visualization.
    Courtesy of Jennifer E. Fox
    Alfalfa roots secrete chemical signals into soil to attract and recruit bacteria. These bacteria live in a plant's roots and provide a natural fertilizer source. Pictured is an alfalfa root with root hairs that have attracted rhizobia soil bacteria, which are engineered to appear in green fluorescence for easier visualization.
  • Jennifer E. Fox, NIH/NRSA postdoctoral fellow at the University of Oregon, has shown that many pesticides interfere with the ability of legumes to recruit soil bacteria needed to provide a natural fertilizer to crops.
    University of Oregon
    Jennifer E. Fox, NIH/NRSA postdoctoral fellow at the University of Oregon, has shown that many pesticides interfere with the ability of legumes to recruit soil bacteria needed to provide a natural fertilizer to crops.
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