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  • Five micron by five micron tapping mode atomic force microscopy images taken in four seconds with the FIRAT probe (top) and the regular AFM tip (bottom). After four seconds, the 256-line FIRAT image is complete while the regular image contains just four lines of data.
    Georgia Tech Image: Levent Degertekin
    Five micron by five micron tapping mode atomic force microscopy images taken in four seconds with the FIRAT probe (top) and the regular AFM tip (bottom). After four seconds, the 256-line FIRAT image is complete while the regular image contains just four lines of data.
  • Levent Degertekin (left), a professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech, shows the adapted AFM holder while graduate student Guclu Onaran points to an image of the FIRAT probe scanning a sample. The front monitor displays the topography of a sample obtained by the FIRAT probe at a speed of 2 frames per second, which is nearly 100 times faster than the normal speed.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    Levent Degertekin (left), a professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech, shows the adapted AFM holder while graduate student Guclu Onaran points to an image of the FIRAT probe scanning a sample. The front monitor displays the topography of a sample obtained by the FIRAT probe at a speed of 2 frames per second, which is nearly 100 times faster than the normal speed.
  • An AFM holder adapted so that the FIRAT probe can be used on existing AFM systems. The FIRAT probe can simultaneously measure topography and material properties including adhesion, stiffness, elasticity and viscosity.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    An AFM holder adapted so that the FIRAT probe can be used on existing AFM systems. The FIRAT probe can simultaneously measure topography and material properties including adhesion, stiffness, elasticity and viscosity.
  • Levent Degertekin, a professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech, shows the adapted AFM holder. The monitor shows an image of the FIRAT probe scanning a sample as seen through the AFM system's optical camera.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    Levent Degertekin, a professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech, shows the adapted AFM holder. The monitor shows an image of the FIRAT probe scanning a sample as seen through the AFM system's optical camera.
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