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  • University of Utah engineers have invented a wireless car key device (sample shown at right) to stop teenage motorists from talking on their cell phone or sending text messages while driving. Each driver of a car would have a separate key device. When the key is extended from the device, it sends a signal to the teenage driver's phone, putting the phone in
    University of Utah.
    University of Utah engineers have invented a wireless car key device (sample shown at right) to stop teenage motorists from talking on their cell phone or sending text messages while driving. Each driver of a car would have a separate key device. When the key is extended from the device, it sends a signal to the teenage driver's phone, putting the phone in "driving mode" so it cannot be used to talk or send texts. The phone displays a stop sign while in driving mode. The University has licensed the Key2SafeDribving technology to a private company, which hopes to have the device on the market within six months, possibly through cell phone plan providers.
  • Xuesong Zhou, a civil engineer at the University of Utah, holds a sample of the Key2SafeDriving car key device (right) that wirelessly disables a teenage driver's cell phone (left) so the phone cannot be used to make calls or send text messages while driving. The system allows 911 calls. Zhou invented the device with Wally Curry, a University of Utah alumnus who now practices medicine in Hays, Kan.
    University of Utah.
    Xuesong Zhou, a civil engineer at the University of Utah, holds a sample of the Key2SafeDriving car key device (right) that wirelessly disables a teenage driver's cell phone (left) so the phone cannot be used to make calls or send text messages while driving. The system allows 911 calls. Zhou invented the device with Wally Curry, a University of Utah alumnus who now practices medicine in Hays, Kan.
  • University of Utah engineers developed a new Key2SafeDriving system to prevent teenagers from using cell phones while driving and to reduce cell phone use by adult motorists. Each driver of a car would have their own special key. When the key is extended from the wireless device (sample shown at left), the device sends a signal that displays a stop sign on the cell phone (right) and prevents it from being used to make calls or send text messages. For adult drivers, the system prevents texting and allows calls only on hands-free cell phones. Parents can control the system from a computer. Here, the screen displays safety scores collected by the system based not only on cell phone use, but on driving speed and traffic violations tracked by Global Positioning System satellites.
    University of Utah.
    University of Utah engineers developed a new Key2SafeDriving system to prevent teenagers from using cell phones while driving and to reduce cell phone use by adult motorists. Each driver of a car would have their own special key. When the key is extended from the wireless device (sample shown at left), the device sends a signal that displays a stop sign on the cell phone (right) and prevents it from being used to make calls or send text messages. For adult drivers, the system prevents texting and allows calls only on hands-free cell phones. Parents can control the system from a computer. Here, the screen displays safety scores collected by the system based not only on cell phone use, but on driving speed and traffic violations tracked by Global Positioning System satellites.
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