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  • The QUIET experiment in operation in the Atacama Desert. The receiver in the mount on the roof of the building rapidly scans the sky, looking for radiation emitted shortly after the birth of the universe.
    QUIET collaboration
    The QUIET experiment in operation in the Atacama Desert. The receiver in the mount on the roof of the building rapidly scans the sky, looking for radiation emitted shortly after the birth of the universe.
  • Here QUIET team members display circuitry and components developed for the detection of gravity waves: physics graduate students Immanuel Buder and Alison Brizius (front row); Colin Bischoff, physics graduate student; David Moore, undergraduate in physics; Akito Kusaka, postdoctoral fellow in the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics; and Bruce Winstein, the Samuel K. Allison Distinguished Service Professor in Physics (back row, l-r).
    Lloyd DeGrane
    Here QUIET team members display circuitry and components developed for the detection of gravity waves: physics graduate students Immanuel Buder and Alison Brizius (front row); Colin Bischoff, physics graduate student; David Moore, undergraduate in physics; Akito Kusaka, postdoctoral fellow in the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics; and Bruce Winstein, the Samuel K. Allison Distinguished Service Professor in Physics (back row, l-r).
  • University of Chicago members of the QUIET collaboration at work (l-r): postdoctoral fellow Akito Kusaka and physics graduate students Colin Bischoff, Immanuel Buder and Alison Brizius. These components will enhance the sensitivity of the QUIET experiment, which began operating in Chile's Atacama Desert last October.
    Lloyd DeGrane
    University of Chicago members of the QUIET collaboration at work (l-r): postdoctoral fellow Akito Kusaka and physics graduate students Colin Bischoff, Immanuel Buder and Alison Brizius. These components will enhance the sensitivity of the QUIET experiment, which began operating in Chile's Atacama Desert last October.
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