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  • A team of Georgia Tech researchers adjusts equipment used to study a gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate composed of sodium atoms. The condensate could be used for communicating among quantum computers. Shown, (l-r) are postdoctoral fellow Carlo Samson, associate professor Chandra Raman and graduate student Anshuman Vinit.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    A team of Georgia Tech researchers adjusts equipment used to study a gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate composed of sodium atoms. The condensate could be used for communicating among quantum computers. Shown, (l-r) are postdoctoral fellow Carlo Samson, associate professor Chandra Raman and graduate student Anshuman Vinit.
  • Georgia Tech associate professor Chandra Raman adjusts equipment used to study a gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate composed of sodium atoms. The condensate could be used for communicating among quantum computers.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    Georgia Tech associate professor Chandra Raman adjusts equipment used to study a gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate composed of sodium atoms. The condensate could be used for communicating among quantum computers.
  • Image shows laboratory apparatus that Georgia Tech physicists used to study how Bose-Einstein condensates might be used for communicating quantum information among ultra-fast quantum computers.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    Image shows laboratory apparatus that Georgia Tech physicists used to study how Bose-Einstein condensates might be used for communicating quantum information among ultra-fast quantum computers.
  • These images show that quantum correlations in the Georgia Tech Bose-Einstein condensate are highly concentrated at first (top graph), then slowly diffuse outward (lower two graphs). The peaks show the localization of the correlations.
    Images courtesy of Chandra Raman
    These images show that quantum correlations in the Georgia Tech Bose-Einstein condensate are highly concentrated at first (top graph), then slowly diffuse outward (lower two graphs). The peaks show the localization of the correlations.
  • A team of Georgia Tech researchers adjusts equipment used to study a gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate composed of sodium atoms. The condensate could be used for communicating among quantum computers. Shown, (l-r) are postdoctoral fellow Carlo Samson, associate professor Chandra Raman and graduate student Anshuman Vinit.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    A team of Georgia Tech researchers adjusts equipment used to study a gaseous Bose-Einstein condensate composed of sodium atoms. The condensate could be used for communicating among quantum computers. Shown, (l-r) are postdoctoral fellow Carlo Samson, associate professor Chandra Raman and graduate student Anshuman Vinit.
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