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  • Cichlids (Maylandia zebra) used for research on brain development are shown with a structure used to simulate the rocky reefs in their natural habitat. The bright white fishes in the middle and upper part of the tank are males; the yellowish fishes on the bottom and lower right are females.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    Cichlids (Maylandia zebra) used for research on brain development are shown with a structure used to simulate the rocky reefs in their natural habitat. The bright white fishes in the middle and upper part of the tank are males; the yellowish fishes on the bottom and lower right are females.
  • A male Cynotilapa afra is shown in a tank in the laboratory of Todd Streelman at Georgia Tech.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    A male Cynotilapa afra is shown in a tank in the laboratory of Todd Streelman at Georgia Tech.
  • Georgia Tech researcher Jonathan Sylvester is shown with a flask containing cichlid embryos. After spawning, female cichlids hold the embryos in their mouths until they are juvenile. The broods can also be grown in flasks to any desired stage of development.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    Georgia Tech researcher Jonathan Sylvester is shown with a flask containing cichlid embryos. After spawning, female cichlids hold the embryos in their mouths until they are juvenile. The broods can also be grown in flasks to any desired stage of development.
  • Georgia Tech researcher Jonathan Sylvester examines a group of fishes to look for brooding cichlids. After spawning, females hold their embryos in their mouths, so he looks for fish with closed mouths and protruding lower jaws.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    Georgia Tech researcher Jonathan Sylvester examines a group of fishes to look for brooding cichlids. After spawning, females hold their embryos in their mouths, so he looks for fish with closed mouths and protruding lower jaws.
  • Researcher Jonathan Sylvester holds a beaker and transfer pipette which are used to collect embryos from brooding female cichlids.
    Georgia Tech Photo: Gary Meek
    Researcher Jonathan Sylvester holds a beaker and transfer pipette which are used to collect embryos from brooding female cichlids.
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