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  • Complex, scalable arrays of semiconductor heterojunctions—promising building blocks for future electronics—were formed within a two-dimensional crystalline monolayer of molybdenum deselenide by converting lithographically exposed regions to molybdenum disulfide using pulsed laser deposition of sulfur atoms. Sulfur atoms (green) replaced selenium atoms (red) in lithographically exposed regions (top) as shown by Raman spectroscopic mapping (bottom).
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy
    Complex, scalable arrays of semiconductor heterojunctions—promising building blocks for future electronics—were formed within a two-dimensional crystalline monolayer of molybdenum deselenide by converting lithographically exposed regions to molybdenum disulfide using pulsed laser deposition of sulfur atoms. Sulfur atoms (green) replaced selenium atoms (red) in lithographically exposed regions (top) as shown by Raman spectroscopic mapping (bottom).
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