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  • Over billions of years, evolution has found clever ways to fold proteins to do many jobs. People can't wait that long. The hunt for new synthetic material--like stronger polymers and more-targeted medicines--has chemists seeking for better ways to control the shapes of molecules. University of Vermont chemist Severin Schneebeli has found a revolutionary one.
    Joshua Brown
    Over billions of years, evolution has found clever ways to fold proteins to do many jobs. People can't wait that long. The hunt for new synthetic material--like stronger polymers and more-targeted medicines--has chemists seeking for better ways to control the shapes of molecules. University of Vermont chemist Severin Schneebeli has found a revolutionary one.
  • A blue wrench (of molecules) to adjust a green bolt (a pillarene ring) that binds a yellow chemical “guest.” It’s a new tool—just 1.7 nanometers wide—that could help scientists catalyze and create a host of useful new materials.
    Severin Schneebeli, UVM
    A blue wrench (of molecules) to adjust a green bolt (a pillarene ring) that binds a yellow chemical “guest.” It’s a new tool—just 1.7 nanometers wide—that could help scientists catalyze and create a host of useful new materials.
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