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  • (Bottom left) Classical computers store data in bits that can have a state of either 0 or 1. Quantum computers store data in quantum bits (qubits) that can have a superposition of both 0 and 1 states. (Top left) A graphical representation of nitrogen vacancy (NV) qubits fabricated within diamond. (Right) These NVs were made in precise, dense arrays (μm = micrometers) for future quantum computers.
    Image courtesy of Dirk Englund, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Sara Jarret
    (Bottom left) Classical computers store data in bits that can have a state of either 0 or 1. Quantum computers store data in quantum bits (qubits) that can have a superposition of both 0 and 1 states. (Top left) A graphical representation of nitrogen vacancy (NV) qubits fabricated within diamond. (Right) These NVs were made in precise, dense arrays (μm = micrometers) for future quantum computers.
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