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  • An illustration shows nanocrystals assembling into ordered ‘superlattices’ – a process that a SLAC/Stanford team was able to observe in real time with X-rays from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). They discovered that this assembly takes just a few seconds when carried out in hot solutions. The results open the door for rapid self-assembly of nanocrystal building blocks into complex structures with applications in optoelectronics, solar cells, catalysis and magnetic materials.
    Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    An illustration shows nanocrystals assembling into ordered ‘superlattices’ – a process that a SLAC/Stanford team was able to observe in real time with X-rays from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL). They discovered that this assembly takes just a few seconds when carried out in hot solutions. The results open the door for rapid self-assembly of nanocrystal building blocks into complex structures with applications in optoelectronics, solar cells, catalysis and magnetic materials.
  • A lab in the Stanford Chemical Engineering Department where nanocrystals are grown. Experiments at SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) were able to observe the simultaneous growth of nanocrystals and superlattices for the first time.
    Dawn Harmer/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    A lab in the Stanford Chemical Engineering Department where nanocrystals are grown. Experiments at SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) were able to observe the simultaneous growth of nanocrystals and superlattices for the first time.
  • Stanford Assistant Professor Matteo Cargnello at a lab in the Stanford Chemical Engineering Department where nanocrystals are grown. Cargnello and Chris Tassone, a staff scientist at SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), led a team that discovered how superlattices can grow unexpectedly fast – in seconds, rather than hours or days – during routine nanocrystal synthesis.
    Dawn Harmer/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Stanford Assistant Professor Matteo Cargnello at a lab in the Stanford Chemical Engineering Department where nanocrystals are grown. Cargnello and Chris Tassone, a staff scientist at SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), led a team that discovered how superlattices can grow unexpectedly fast – in seconds, rather than hours or days – during routine nanocrystal synthesis.
  • Members of the nanocrystal research team, from left: Assistant Professor Jian Qin, postdoctoral researcher Liheng Wu and Assistant Professor Matteo Cargnello, all of Stanford; SLAC staff scientist Chris Tassone; and Stanford graduate student Joshua Willis.
    Dawn Harmer/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Members of the nanocrystal research team, from left: Assistant Professor Jian Qin, postdoctoral researcher Liheng Wu and Assistant Professor Matteo Cargnello, all of Stanford; SLAC staff scientist Chris Tassone; and Stanford graduate student Joshua Willis.
  • The experimental set-up at SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) where scientists used an X-ray beam to observe superlattices forming during the synthesis of nanocrystals for the first time. The vessel where the reactions took place is at bottom center, wrapped in gold heating tape that boosted the temperature inside to more than 230 degrees Celsius.
    Liheng Wu/Stanford University
    The experimental set-up at SLAC’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) where scientists used an X-ray beam to observe superlattices forming during the synthesis of nanocrystals for the first time. The vessel where the reactions took place is at bottom center, wrapped in gold heating tape that boosted the temperature inside to more than 230 degrees Celsius.
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