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  • A healthy staghorn coral. Researchers at The Ohio State University and their colleagues have demonstrated how rising temperatures and acidification combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes—that is, unbalance the natural coral “microbiome.
    Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University.
    A healthy staghorn coral. Researchers at The Ohio State University and their colleagues have demonstrated how rising temperatures and acidification combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes—that is, unbalance the natural coral “microbiome."
  • A healthy yellow scroll coral. have demonstrated how two separate effects of climate change combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes—that is, unbalance the natural coral “microbiome.
    Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University.
    A healthy yellow scroll coral. have demonstrated how two separate effects of climate change combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes—that is, unbalance the natural coral “microbiome."
  • A staghorn coral after exposure to higher temperatures and acidification. have demonstrated how two separate effects of climate change combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes—that is, unbalance the natural coral “microbiome.
    Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University.
    A staghorn coral after exposure to higher temperatures and acidification. have demonstrated how two separate effects of climate change combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes—that is, unbalance the natural coral “microbiome." With its weaker microbiome (compared to yellow scroll coral), the staghorn coral did not fare well, as evidenced by its whitish, "bleached" color.
  • A yellow scroll coral after exposure to higher temperatures and acidification. have demonstrated how two separate effects of climate change combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes—that is, unbalance the natural coral “microbiome.
    Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University.
    A yellow scroll coral after exposure to higher temperatures and acidification. have demonstrated how two separate effects of climate change combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes—that is, unbalance the natural coral “microbiome." With its stronger microbiome (compared to staghorn coral), the yellow scroll coral fared better in the study.
  • The tank system at Reef System Coral Farm in New Albany, Ohio, where Ohio State researchers test corals' response to changing water conditions.
    Photo courtesy of The Ohio State University.
    The tank system at Reef System Coral Farm in New Albany, Ohio, where Ohio State researchers test corals' response to changing water conditions.
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